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History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 505

BABB, E. C. was born in Westbrook, Maine, February, 1834, where he followed lumbering until 1857, then moved to Berlin Falls, New Hampshire, and continued the lumber business until 1862, when he enlisted in the Ninth New Hampshire Volunteers; served as non-commissioned officer three months, was promoted Second .Lieutenant. In 1868, was promoted First Lieutenant and Captain in 1864. Was honorably discharged June, 1865. Speculated in oil in Canada two years; came to Minneapolis in 1868, and engaged in lumbering until the fall of 1875; since then has been in the ice business; proprietor of the Minneapolis Ice Company, until the formation of the Cedar Lake Ice Company in 1878. Was married at Berlin Falls, New Hampshire, August 1862, to Miss L. Chandler, of that place.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 252

BABCOCK, E. A. born in Washington county, Vermont, in 1832. Moved with parents to Worcester, Massachusetts, remained there three years; settled finally in Newport, New Hampshire, until 1839, when they removed to Enfield, remaining there until 1864; he then moved to Excelsior, Minnesota. Married in October, 1864, to Emily L. Erskine, of Wayne county, Michigan. They have two children living. His father, Augustus Babcock, came to Hennepin county in 1854.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 505

BACHNER, Ernest and Bernard twin brothers, were born in Prussia, February 1st, 1844. They learned the gunsmith trade in their native country, and in 1865, came to America, landing at Baltimore. Ernest secured a position in a gun manufactory at Washington, D. C., and Bernard came West, securing a position at Eau Claire, Wisconsin. They remained in their respective places about a year, and then met by appointment at Minneapolis; since then they have been identified with the interests of this city. For description of business, see other portions of this work.

 

From the History of Minneapolis, Gateway to the Northwest, Vol. II,  pg 230-233.Author: S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1923. File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Peter Badger caldeyone@hotmail.com

BADGER, Walter L, The qualities of leadership are possessed by Walter L. Badger. Without desire for domination in any particular field, he has nevertheless forged to the front as the result of his capability in the field in which he labors, until today his opinions are accepted as authority in real estate circles and by the general public concerning property interests, both business and residential, in Minneapolis. Throughout his career he has displayed a marked devotion and loyalty to the city and its up building and improvement, and this has been manifest in many tangible ways, leading to municipal reform and to the adoption of high civic standards.
Walter L. Badger comes to Minnesota from the neighboring state of Wisconsin, his birth having occurred in Fond du Lac, May 27, 1868. He is a son of George A. and Harriet E. (Hastings) Badger, who were natives of Massachusetts and representatives of old New England families. Both were born in the city of Amherst and there the father pursued his education and made his initial step in business. After attaining his majority he became associated with his father, George Badger, Sr.,in the lumber trade and for many years devoted his attention to that line of business. Removing westward, he resided for a number of years in Wisconsin and then came to Minneapolis in 1878, spending his remaining days in this city, his death occurring in 1902. The removal of the family from Fond du Lac to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, during the early boyhood of Walter L. Badger occasioned him to become a pupil in the public schools of the latter city, which he attended until 1878, and then as a youth of ten years he came with his parents to Minneapolis, where he devoted the three succeeding years to further study. He was a lad of but thirteen, however, when he put aside his textbooks in order to provide for his own support, securing the position of office boy with a real estate firm. He found his task congenial and the business to his liking and throughout the intervening years to the present time he has continued in the same field of labor. He established business on his own account in 1886 and four years later he became identified with the firm of Corser & Company as a special partner. That connection was continued until 1896, when he left the firm again to engage in business independently, and in 1912 he incorporated his interests under the name of the Walter L. Badger Company, admitting to a partnership Frederick T. Krafft and Edson J. Kellogg, who had for a number of years been in his employ. The firm today enjoys a high position in realty circles, its enterprise and progressiveness being tempered by a safe conservatism that makes for substantial development and permanency in real estate matters. The company buys and sells property extensively and has made a specialty of managing large estates and office buildings, in which connection a business of gratifying proportions has been built up, and it acts as Minneapolis representative of a number of eastern clients. The firm has largely contributed to the development of Seventh street as a business district.
About 1901 Mr. Badger purchased property on this thoroughfare, for which he paid two hundred and twenty-five dollars per foot, and today the same property would bring five thousand dollars per front foot. He began erect-ing business blocks before tenants were secured and in a few cases gave free rent until firms could get started in business at the new location. The Walter L. Badger Company has also specialized in the development of Hennepin Avenue properties. In October, 1890, was celebrated the marriage of Walter L. Badger and Miss Anna Dawson of Keokuk, Iowa, a daughter of James and Rosa (Hammel) Dawson. They became parents of two sons: Lester R., who is now vice president of the Walter L. Badger Company; and Norman D., who died in 1902. Mr. Badger is a member ofthe Masonic fraternity and belongs also to the Minneapolis, Minikahda, Athletic and Lafayette clubs. His religious faith is indicated by his connection with the Plymouth Congregational church, in the work of which he takes an active and helpful interest. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party where national questions and issues are involved, but at local elections he does not hesitate to cast an independent vote if his judgment so dictates. His foremost interest is the welfare and up building of the city and the direction of activities into those channels through which flows the greatest and most permanent good to the greatest number. His cooperation has therefore been given along many lines of activity for the city's benefit and his strong purpose, his energy and his zeal in public affairs have been far-reaching and resultant.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 506

BAGLEY, George a native of London, England was born March 17th, 1850. At the age of two, he moved with parents to Kingston, Canada, and settled on a farm. When seventeen, he began an apprenticeship at the confectioners' trade in London, Canada, and served three years. In 1872 he removed to Chicago where he worked at his trade until 1878, when he came to this city, established a candy manufactory, and has since remained in that business, now located at 316 Nicollet Avenue. He married Mary Burge of Chicago, December 25th, 1874. They have one child, Ettie Iola.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 272

BAILEY, A. C. was born in Ohio, in 1840. He was educated at Westminster College. In 1862 he enlisted in the First Ohio Independent; served over three years, and was honorably discharged, in 1865, at Gallipolis. The same year he moved to Minnesota, and settled in Medina, where he has since resided. He married Hattie M. Parrish in 1867. Three children have been born to them.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.
Page 216

BAIRD, George W. is a native of Pennsylvania, born April 16th, 1835. In 1857 he removed to Minnesota and purchased the farm of 120 acres which he now occupies, located on section 18. In the spring of 1860 he imported the first Spanish Merino sheep brought into the State. He sold the first fleece of fine wool in Minneapolis receiving 95 cents per pound for the same. He is at present giving his whole attention to fine Cotswold and Lincoln grades, and received first prizes at the Minneapolis Exposition of 1880. He was married October 11th, 1865, to Miss Sarah G. Gates, a native of Vermont.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 506

BAKER, S. Harlan S. civil engineer, office 101 Central Avenue, was born fifty miles west of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 30th, 1846. He followed farming at home till 1865, when he entered the State Normal school, at Millersville, Pennsylvania, and graduated in the fall of 1867, after which he lay sick for two years. In 1869 came west for his health and located in Minneapolis. In the spring of 1870, went railroad surveying under Colonel Clough, remained a short time and engaged on Government survey on the line of the Northern Pacific Railroad, where he remained until the spring of 1872, when he opened his present office. In 1876 was elected county surveyor, and served two terms. Married in Minneapolis, November, 1875, to Miss Laura Mixer. They have one child, Jessie.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 506

BALL, Miner was born December 15th, 1838, at Berne, Albany county, New York. Remained on farm until the age of sixteen; came to Minnesota in 1857, and lived at Caledonia one year, thence to St. Paul, and in 1859 engaged in mercantile business at Rockford, Wright county, being the only trader there. In 1861 sold out and came to Minneapolis and bought a photograph gallery of Charles Robinson, and conducted it until the following spring, when he sold out and moved to Lake City and opened the ginseng trade. In 1863, moved to Menomonee, Dunn county, Wisconsin, and run a livery stable, store and farm for three years. Then returned to Rockford, and went into trade. Built a saw mill opposite Greenwood and run it two years; it burned and he moved to Delano and built the Delano Flour and Saw Mills; remained there until 1879, and was foremost in building up the town. Came to Minneapolis in November, 1879, and entered into real estate and commission business. In 1880, sold his Delano property and in the fall opened a real estate office in the Clark House. Was married February 18th, 1862, to Miss Kate P. Powers, of Greenwood. Their children are Willie P., Robert Leslie, Ruth A., Frank P., and Firman G. Mrs. Ball died December 17th, 1875, and Mr. Ball married for his second wife Mrs. Sallie W. Jackson, of Pennsylvania, July 16th, 1879. She had one daughter, Viola Jackson.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 261

BALL, Richard, was born in England, August 29 1819. He lived with his father, who was a member of Parliament, 12 years. At the age of nineteen he went to New Zealand, spent five year there merchandizing. Returned to England and went to Australia, spent ten years there, doing very successful mercantile business. Returned to England and established a large mercantile and farming business until 1876, when he emigrated to America, and settled on the farm where three of his sons now live. In the spring of 1880 he bought the Delano Flouring and Saw mill which he is now improving to make it the best mill in Wright county. He now lives at Delano village. Was married in England to Miss Elizabeth Masters. They have eight children.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 506

BARBER, Daniel R. was born at Benson, Vermont, in 1818, lived with his father on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age, when he embarked in mercantile life, which he followed for thirteen years, twelve of which he was post-master. In 1856 he closed his business in Benson, and came West, locating at the then small town of St. Anthony Falls. For several years his business was dealing in real estate and loaning money, large sums of which were entrusted to him by Eastern parties, and on which he never met with a loss. He assessed the town and city for eleven years, and was once census enumerator. In 1872 he bought the Cataract Mill (described elsewhere in this work), which he has operated successfully since. Mr. Barber was married in February 1845, at Orwell, Vermont, to Miss Ellen L. Bottum, with whom he has since lived. The fruits of this union are: Julia B., born in May, 1846, and Edwin R., born in November, 1862. In August, 1865, Miss Julia was married to J. Wells Gardner, of this city, who died in San Francisco, California, in 1876. Edwin R. married Miss Hattie E. Sidle, a daughter of H. G. Sidle, banker, in October, 1873. They are now living at 41 South Seventh street. Both Edwin and Mrs. Gardner are partners with their father in the mill. After the death of Mr. Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Barber left the home they had built up and occupied for twenty-one years, corner Fourth street and Second Avenue south and now live with their daughter at Second Avenue south between Fourth and Fifth streets.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 506

BARBER, Ed C. was born in Franklin county, Illinois, June 1st, 1849, and was brought up in his native state, and worked four years in the post-office at Cairo; also engaged as mail agent on mail train for eight years. After some time spent in various other pursuits, he came to Minneapolis in July, 1880, and started a meat-market at 1224 Western Avenue. Married in 1871. Present family, wife and one boy.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARDWELL, CHARLES S. was born in, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, November 19th, 1836. Lived with his parents on the farm until the age of eighteen, when he came to St. Paul, Minnesota, and at once went to work in a sash factory, remaining but a few months; then went to Excelsior, and engaged in carpentering until 1863. Enlisted the following fall in the Second Minnesota Cavalry, serving two years and one month. Was on the frontier among the Indians, near the Bad Lands, and engaged in numerous conflicts with the red-skins. Was discharged in the fall of 1865, and returned to Minneapolis and engaged as foreman with J. Copeland and Company, in the sash, door and blind business. Remained with them six years. In the fall of 1872, went into business with L. C. Bisbee. Sold out in 1875, and moved to his present location. Married Miss Eliza Green, in 1858, who died May 8th, 1864. Mr. Bardwell has one son, who is now in the senior year at the university. In 1867 he was married again, to Miss Nettie Jenks, who died in 1872. They had one child, Lamont J.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARGE, JACOB is a native of Germany, born in 1839. Established business in Minneapolis in 1863. First year's business was two thousand dollars. In 1880 it amounted to thirty thousand dollars. Mr. Barge is at present one of the alder- men of the city. Married Miss Louisa Gessart. They have two children: Louisa and Emma.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARKER, D. H. was born in Cumberland county, Maine, March 1st, 1844. In 1862 he located in Pennsylvania, and engaged in the lumber business. Came to Minneapolis in 1865, and followed lumbering seven years. Started a meat market and route in 1872, on Central Avenue, E. D., where he continued until he was burned out, in January, 1879. Next opened at his present location, where he is doing a growing business in meats, salt and fresh, canned goods, fish and oysters, at No. 717 Washington Avenue south. Married in 1870, to Miss Katie Lammer. They have three children: Nettie, Gracie, and Edna.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARKER S. born in Ripley county, Indiana, August 16th, 1844. Came to this city in 1866, and worked four years in a sawmill, as millwright, and has assisted in building nearly all the mills in the city, and has also worked at repairing. For the past three and a half years, has been with Pillsbury exclusively, as a millwright. Married Rachel Jerman, November 17th, 1868. They have three children: Warren E., William E., and Mary.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 273

BARKOW, Charles was born in Germany, in 1826, and emigrated to America in 1852. He worked at harness making in Cleveland, Ohio, two years, and two years in Oberlin. In 1861 he settled in Hennepin county. Enlisted in company A, Fourth Minnesota Volunteers in 1864, and was honorably discharged in 1865; the same year he married Caroline Sekoggv. They have eight children living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARNABY, E. G. was born in Montreal, Canada, in 1839. He remained there for sixteen years, then he moved to Chatham, Canada West, where he remained till 1857, thence to New York city, entering the mercantile establishment of Lord and Taylor, where he remained until 1863. He then went to Memphis, Tennessee, engaging in business about a year. During the same year, took charge of a dry goods house where he remained till May, 1867, and then started a gents furnishing store under the Overton Hotel, and in 1872, started another store in the same line, under the Peabody Hotel. He continued business till 1879, when he came to Minneapolis and opened a gents furnishing store, at No. 2, Nicollet House block. Was married in Brooklyn, New York, March, 1865, to Miss Mary Finley. They have three children: Carrie, Minnie A., and Mary B.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARNARD, Thomas G. of the furniture manufacturing firm of Barnard and Cope, was born in 1826, at Charlotte Town, Prince Edward Island. Remained there until the age of nineteen, when he went to Boston and learned the cabinet makers trade. After this, worked four years in Boston. Thence to Norway, Oxford county, Maine, engaging in the manufacture of furniture for five years. Came to Minneapolis in 1857, and engaged in the furniture business. His ripe experience, covering a period of thirty years, has made his present establishment one of the institutions of the city. Mr. Barnard has a pleasant home where he resides with his family, on Tenth street, corner of Mary Place.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 273

BARNES, E. S. a native of Maine, was born in 1845. He settled in Hennepin county, in 1855. In 1861 he enlisted in the Second Minnesota Sharpshooters, afterwards Company L, First Minnesota Volunteers, served three years, was wounded at Vicksburg and was in thirteen engagements, under Generals -McClellan and Burnside. He is part owner of a saw mill, also proprietor of a Sorghum mill, capacity one hundred gallons per day. He has a farm of 184 acres and half interest in 300 more. In 1867 he married Martha K. Reynolds. They have two children.

Supplemental information, provided by great-grandson, Eugene Barnes Eugene Barnes

Elbridge S. Barnes, was born in Springfield, Penobscot, Maine, on March 8, 1845.  He is one of several of the given name Elbridge in the families history, and the name is believed derived from that of Elbridge Gerry, 5th Vice President of the United States.  His middle name has been found as "Small" and in various spelling of "Shepard." Throughout his life time in census, military records, deeds and documents, his name appears as E. S. Barnes or Elbridge S. Barnes.   He spent his first 9 1/2 years in Maine some part of which was on the family farm.  In 1855 he migrated with his parents Shepard Blanchard Barnes (1/23/1819 - 11/07/1898) and Olive Hill Small (3/5/ 1818 - 2/07/1897), and five brothers and sisters.  He was educated in the Hennepin County schools and as a youth was said to be such a good shot with the rifle as to be banned from the local prize events.   At 16 years of age, on December 21, 1861, at Excelsior Township, his parents gave their written permission for him to join Colonel Hiram Berdan's United States Sharp Shooters.  His enrollment date is listed as December 14, 1861, and he was described as being 5 ft. 10 in. tall, of medium build, with dark complexion that set off his blue eyes. His enrolment was in the 2nd Minnesota Sharpshooters.  This designation was changed between December 2 and December 31, 1862 to Captain Russell's Company of Minnesota Sharpshooters, and in February 1863 to Company "L" of  United States Sharp Shooters, aka Co. L. of the 1st Minnesota Infantry.  However Co. L. was never a part of the 1st Minn. Inf. Reg., but was attached to that unit at the battle of Antitem.  The two units participated as so attached in all of the actions of the 1st Minn. Inf. Reg. except at Gettysburg. Hiram Berdan's Sharp Shooter wore a special uniform with non reflecting buttons, and used a special Sharps breech loading rifle as well as a smooth bore long rifle, both of which were fixed with telescopic sights and special set double triggers.  Although called snipers, the units were used more in skirmish.    Elbridge's boy hood friend, Wilbur Coleman was shot in the leg at Antitem.  It was at this battle that Elbridge was mistaken for Eldrige Barnes, and was listed as missing in Action.  The latter died of his wounds.   Elbridge's was with his unit within the town of Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862.  They watched the massacre of the Maine and other infantry units attacking Mary's Heights on the hill below.  As the battle progressed he was shot through the left shoulder and the   projectile traversed downward and exited about a foot lower out his back.  His brother recalled being told, ".. that his uniform froze to the ground and prevented him from bleeding to death."    He was sent to Carver Hospital, Washington, for medical treatment, and remained there from December 18, 1862 to June 23, 1863.  On that time he was transferred to the N. R. C. on June 30, 1863.  This was one of several walking wounded units made up of wounded men whose wounds, though healed, prevented their being returned to active duty, but who could use, sword, pistol or rifle, and be employed for garrison duty, breaking up the New York draft riots, and for picking up stragglers at Gettysburg.  It was in this capacity that he was at Gettysburg burg.  He was mustered out of service on December 24, 1864, as a member of Company A, 1st Regiment N.R.C.  

He met Martha Kirk Reynolds, in about 1865.  She was the daughter of Allen Reynolds (June 10, 1810 - July 1894) and Mary Snode Gibson (January 29 1818 -January 1901) who had come to Hennepin County with her family.  Martha was born on April 22, 1844, at New Garden, Columbia County, Ohio.  The family had migrated to Henry, Cadis County, Indiana, in 1858, prior to settling in Hennepin County. 

They were married on October 27, 1867, by Aldice P. Bills, Justice of the Peace in Medina Township.  His sister, Eleanor F. Barnes, and his brother, Mellen S. Barnes, were witnesses.  They are said to have made their home at Smith Bay.  Willie Elbridge Barnes, their son was born on July 8, 1869, and their daughter Atlanta May Barnes on July 9, 1860.  The family continued to reside in the area until about  mid 1898.

When his father left in 1880, Elbridge occupied the home until 1892 when he built a new house to the west and south which was destroyed in a freak tornado in 1955.  During those years, in addition to the sawmill and sorgu mill, Elbridge bought and sold real property.  In 1889 he was one of the petitioners favoring the creation of the new town of Orono.  A wall map of 1890 shows Elbridge property  in Sec. 3-153-90 in almost the same location and size as his father's property appeared in 1857.  By August 10 1893, Elbridge filed for a pension on basis of his wound and affidavits were given by David N. Plant, and Albia Stinson.  There after he was listed on the pension rolls published for Hennepin County.

A recently discovered wall map of 1896 shows That Elbridge had a property development in the Markeville area.  In 1898, Elbridge, his wife and family left Hennepin County and settled on a small ranch in Bayview, Lincoln County, Oregon.  He died in Oregon on April 18, 1905, and is buried in the Cedar Mills Cemetery, Washington County, Oregon.  He was survived by his wife, son Willie E. Barnes, daughter, Mrs. Charles Berglund, and three grandchildren.  Martha Kirk Barnes moved to Beaverton, Washington County, Oregon, where she remained for several years.  She died at the home of her daughter in rural Tillamook County, on May 22, 1926, and was buried alongside of her husband at the Cedar Mills Cemetery

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 272

BARNES, S. was born in Maine, in 1826. He settled in Medina in 1855, and lived there until 1880, when he removed to Oregon and settled near Portland. When he came to Hennepin county he had but fifty cents. The first year he cleared three acres and planted it to corn, but was scourged with the grasshoppers, and was obliged to support his family by making ox yokes and axe handles.

Additional information supplied by descendant, Gene Barnes Eugene Barnes

BARNES, Shepard Blanchard who was born on January 28, 1819, in Kingfield, Somerset County, Maine.  He was the son of Nathaniel B. Barnes (1773-1851) and Jane Blanchard (1784-1874, and the last of their children born in the Dis- trict of Maine, Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  He grew up on the family farms in Kingfield 1819-1836 and Springfield about 1836-1842.  In Springfield, on April 16, 1842, he married Olive Hill Small, who resided close by with her mother and stepfather.  Olive was born on March 25, 1818, in Cherryfield, Washington County, Maine, and was the daughter of Benjamin Small (1785- 1828) and Syrena Wakefield (1796-1866). After her father's death her mother married Joel Farndworth in Cherryfield in 1830.    Shepard and Olive were residents of Springfield for several years where most of their children were born; Eleanor Frances Barnes, on June 30, 1843; Elbridge S. Barnes, on March 8, 1845; Mellen Shepperd Barnes, on April 14, 1847; James Wilson Barnes, on April 1, 1849; Melissa Farnsworth Barnes, on May 13, 1851; and Elenor and John Calvin Barnes on April 14, 1853.  Elenor did not survive.  The family later resided in Bangor where Shepard is said to have worked with his brother David in a shoe store.  While there in 1854-1855, Shepard sold two parcels, and in 1885 set out with his family for the Minnesota Territory.  They traveled by rail, to Bangor, by boat on the great lakes, and by rail to the river and by river boat and barge to the Mississippi.  During this trip a barge with their goods sank.  The loss has been described as both partial and total as to assets, clothing and the like.  By the vessel "War Eagle" they traveled up river to St. Paul, and by wagon or cart to what later was to become Medina Township.  He settled on what turned out to be railroad land then located on Turnham Road.  His granddaughter, Bessie Olive Wiley, recalled years later, "...that is on Watertown Road he first built a bark and log cabin where... the Loyd Kelly place is now.  I have a log from that cabin."  He farmed several parcels but was troubled by the many grasshopper hordes over the years, the summer heat, and frozen winters.  Two more daughters were born in Hennepin County: Olive Mary Barnes, on Febrauary 16, 1856, and Louis E. Barnes in 1859.  Two of his sons served in the Civil War and survived: Elbridge S. Barnes in the 2nd Company of Minnesota Sharp Shooters (aka Co. L. Hiram Berdans United States Sharp Shooters), and Mellen S. Barnes in the 6th Minnesota Infantry.  During his residence in Medina and Excelsior, Shepard donated land for a public school and his photograph at one time was displayed in that school.  In 1880, he and many members of his family moved to what was a residence in what was then known as "Snookemville," near Beaverton, Washington County, Oregon, where he purchased several large parcels of land. He also purchased land in what was then Benton County, Oregon.  In Beaverton he donated both land and money for the construction of a new public school near his farm.  Although the building has undergone reconstruction over the ensuing years, the "Barnes School," remains the oldest, continuous grammar school in the Beaverton School District.  After a marriage of fifty five years, Olive Hill Barnes, after a long illness, died at their home on February 6, 1897.  Shepard died there on November 9, 1898.  The were both buried in the Cedar Mill Cemetery, Washington County, Oregon.  They were survived by eight children and thirty-four grandchildren.  

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARNUM, John T. of the firm of Barnum and Goodrich, trunk manufacturers, was born at Rochester, New York, March 5th, 1857. Received his education at the Rensselaer Polytechnic school, Troy, New York, in 1879 and remained in Rochester one year. Came to Minneapolis in April 1880, was with D. D. Whitney in his trunk factory. September 1st, 1880, took possession of the business in company with Mr. Goodrich.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 507

BARROWS, F. C. was born in Orino, Maine, March 29th, 1832. He was reared in the lumber region of that state; after reaching manhood, engaged in that business until 1855, when he moved from the "Pine Tree State'' and came direct to St. Anthony. He at once entered the ranks as a lumberman, first for Dwight, Woodbury and Company, in building a mill and dam at St. Francis, above Anoka, on the Rum river. In 1868 he formed a partnership with Jonathan Chase, in the winter of 1869-1870, he and his brother became partners, the firm known as "Barrows Bros." For several years they did job work for J. Dean and Company, during which time they accumulated quite a stock of logs, which they were two years in converting into lumber. In March, 1878, he entered the firm of which he is now a member, Merriman, Barrows and Company. He was married to Miss Sarah J. Swain, at Minneapolis, October 25th, 1864. They have had five children; four of whom are now living; Nellie, Freddie, Harry, and Frankie. Mrs. Barrows died in March 1873. He remained a widower until March, 1877, when he was United to Mrs. Sadie E. Jones, of Stillwater.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 508

BARROWS, W. M. born at Augusta, Maine, September 1st, 1830, moved with his parents to Orino, Milford and Lincoln, finally to Chester, where he remained till 1855, following lumbering. Moved to Old Town, and remained till the fall of 1856; came to St. Anthony and for seven years worked in the woods winters and on the river summers. Run a freight train from St. Anthony to St. Paul from 1863 to 1865. In the fall of 1865 started the lumber business with a Mr. Spafford, under the firm name of Barrows and Spafford for one year, then alone for one year. In the fall of 1867 took as partner Andrew Hall, for one year. Fall of 1868 the firm of Barrows Brothers was formed. Married Nancy Fernold, July 3d, 1855. They have six children, William H., Melvin P., Wyley R., Lydia F., Eddie P. and Jessie.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 242

BARTOW, Samuel born in Ohio, April 18th, 1818. When nineteen, bought a farm in Monroe county. Lived there until the fall of 1849, when he located in Bartholomew county, Indiana. Lived there three years, teaching school part of the time, then went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, and St. Louis, Mo.; from there by steamer to St. Paul and to Minnetonka. Made a claim to the farm on which he now lives, located on the south shore of Lake Minnetonka. Married in 1839 to Mary McKenney. They have five children. He has held the office of county commissioner and has been prominent in the affairs' of the town.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

Page 242

BARTOW, Robert R. born in Monroe county, Ohio, May 10th, 1845. In 1849 moved to Indiana, then to Council Bluffs, Iowa. Came to Minnesota in 1852, and worked with his father on the farm, then bought the one on which he now lives. Married Miss E. M. Page, July, 1869, who died March 17th, 1879. Has two children: Horace B. and Robert W.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

Page 508

BATES, John W. was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, January 5th, 1849, where he lived for four years, then moved with parents to Troy, New York, and remained about two years. In 1855, came to Minnesota with his mother and settled in St. Anthony. From 1868 to 1873 taught school in Henry county, Illinois, and from 1873 to 1877 engaged in coopering at St. Joseph, Missouri. Returned to Minnesota, and in August, 1879, he was appointed on the police force, which position he has since held. His mother died in 1873 in this city.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

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BATES C. H. was born at Cohasset, Massachusetts, November 26th, 1852. He was educated principally at Boston, Massachusetts, also studied dentistry in the same place and practiced his profession there. Has practiced dentistry eight years. Came to Minneapolis in May, 1880, and is now permanently located at 327 Nicollet Avenue. Family consists of himself and wife.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

Page 508

BAUSMAN, A. L. was born in Pennsylvania, March 25th, 1834. Educated at Pittsburg and studied dentistry at the same place for three years. Came to Minneapolis in 1856, and has been in continuous practice of his profession since. The doctor is the oldest dentist in practice in the city. Was married to Miss Fannie R. Abraham, of Minneapolis, November 1863; she died in 1876. Married again, January 1879, to Rebecca Fenby, of St. Louis. They have three children: Bertha, George and Fenby.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

Page 508

BAXTER, James firm of Downs and Baxter, was born in Westmoreland, England, August 10th, 1835. At the age of sixteen commenced the trade of stone cutter and mason; came to America in 1854, and finished his trade in Chicago, where he remained until 1857, when he came to St. Paul In 1859, went to Carrollton, Indiana, where he was employed as foreman for quarries and cut stone used in the Portland locks, for Barton, Robinson and Company, contractors for Louisville and Portland canal and locks. In 1865 came to Minneapolis, and until 1877, was employed as foreman for R. B. Langdon, Saulspaugh and Company, St. Anthony Falls Water - Power Company, and others, also took some contracts on his own account. Was married at St. Anthony, November 2d, 1859 to Miss Catherine Ryan, of St. Paul. They have five children living; William C., Mary, Bridget, Eleanor and Catherine.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

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BAYER, J. D. was born in Nova Scotia, in 1832. He lived there until 1877, then moved to Boston, Massachusetts, for two years, thence to New York; he then came to Hennepin county and settled in 1880. Worked on farm thirty years, then learned the carpenters trade. He was superintendent of the Orphan's Home, in Halifax, his wife acting as matron, having charge of it for seven years. His marriage with Elizabeth A. Brown, occurred in the year 1860.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 508

BAYER, John proprietor of Bayer's hotel, located at 109 First street north. Mr. Bayer, was born in Germany, in 1831; came to America in 1854; came to Minnesota in May 1855, and located in Scott county, where he remained for three years, thence to Wisconsin and lived three years. In 1861, enlisted in the First Minnesota Regiment Volunteers; served three years, when he returned to Scott county, and remained until the spring of 1865, when he came to Minneapolis. Married Annie Berndgen, July 21st, 1865. They have five children; John R. H., Lucy, George G., Anthony M., and Frank X. M.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 228

BAZLEY, T. T. was born in England, November 28th, 1828; settled in Canada, 1842; moved to Minnesota, 1852; on his present farm in 1853; married, September 8, 1857, to Miss Catherine Miller, from Ireland, who died, November 10th, 1859; married again, September, 1862, to Miss Nancy Stinson. He tried to enlist as a soldier, but was rejected. Children are, Phebe, Kate, Jennette, Tom, Josephine, Lillie J.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 509

BEAL, Alonzo H. was born in Saco, York county, Maine, July 10th, 1833. When fourteen years of age he began studying photography, but left that business and went to Buffalo in 1852, engaging in the furnishing business two years. In l854 he returned to Maine, as a photographer, and has continued as such ever since. In April, 1855, he was married to Ruth Clark, of Hollis, Maine. They have two children, Eugene and Charles. Mr. Beal moved to Boston, in 1857, thence to St. Anthony Falls in 1860. After having made several attempts to get a fine gallery, each of which was destroyed by fire, he finally established himself at No. 18 South Fourth street, where he has since remained and prospered.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 509

BEAUMONT, J. Flanders eye and ear surgeon, was born in Freeport, Illinois, March 29th, 1859; educated at Freeport and Montrose, Illinois, and at Princeton college. First studied medicine with his father Dr. J. H. Beaumont, and Dr. Constantine Hering, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College of Philadelphia in 1876, with the degree of .M. D. He next entered the New York Ophthalmic Hospital and studied diseases of the eye and ear, was afterwards assistant surgeon in the same hospital. Was also an attending physician of the New York Homeopathic Dispensary. He came to Minneapolis in August, 1880, and confines his practice solely to the treatment of eye and ear diseases; is a member of the American Ophthalmological and Otological Societies; Illinois Homeopathic Association, and Hennepin county Homeopathic Society. Dr. Beaumont was marriage in 1878 to Miss Ella Jenifer, of Cincinnati, Ohio. They have one child, Alice J.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 509

BECKER, Jacob was born in Stark county, Ohio, November 18th, 1841, and was married to Elizabeth Moarls, in 1867. They have had five children, three of whom are living: Mary, Anna and Ida. Mr. Becker enlisted in 1861 in the One Hundred and Seventh Ohio volunteers. He served one year only, and removed from Wooster, Wayne county, where he at that time lived, to Milwaukee, Wisconsin; thence to Winona, St. Louis and Minneapolis. Here he erected, in 1873, the Island Saloon, and has since been proprietor.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 509

BEEBE, Franklin of the law firm of Beebe & Rossnaan, 112 Hennepin Avenue, was born at Lincklaen, Chenango county, New York, October 28th, 1825. Remained with parents until 1843, attending Oxford and DeRuyter Academies. He then entered the State Normal School at Albany, New York, and in 1848 began the study of law at Truxton, with Alanson Coats, and finished in the office of John Waite at Norwich, New York. Was admitted to practice in 1851, and formed a partnership with John Waite, and practiced law at Norwich, until the fall of 1855, when he came West and located at Minneapolis in l856. Opened an office near the old land office, and soon after removed to the building then owned by T. Chambers, near the suspension bridge. Has since been elected three times to the office of probate judge, in the meantime following his profession. The present firm was formed in the fall of 1879, and is a successful one. Was married first in Norwich, New York, April, 1858, to Miss Lavinia, daughter of Dr. James Thompson, of that city, who died January 13th, 1868, leaving two daughters now living: Mary Francis and Harriet Lavinia. Mr. Beebe was married again to Dora H., daughter of D. G. Thompson, of North Warmouth, Maine. They have one child now living, Daniel G.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 252

BEEMAN, A. P. born in Maine, 1828, lived at Lewiston, and Lowell, Mass., seven years. Visited many parts of the world, spending some time in Australia. Moved to Excelsior in 1853, where he has since resided. Enlisted in 1863 in Company D, Second Cavalry. Served two years, was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865. Married in 1851 to Louisa M. Midgley, of Montpelier. Is proprietor of a Sorghum machine of Madison Manufacturing Company's patent crusher and Stubbs pans, with capacity for 150 gallons per day.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 509

BELL S. N. is a native of Ohio, and was born January 4th, 1831. He married, in 1854, Rosetta Bowers, of New York. They have six children: Minnie, Eva, Carrie, Milton, Grant and Colfax. He lived in Racine, Wisconsin, a number of years, engaging in farming while there; also after removing to Faribault county, Minnesota. In 1875, he engaged in the grocery business in Minneapolis, 416 Nicollet Avenue, where he is still found.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 509

BENDEKE, Karl a native of Norway, was born April 21st, 1841. After graduating from the medical school of Christiana, Norway, in 1865 he came to the United States in 1867. At Chicago he again graduated from the medical college in 1869, and practiced in that city until he removed to Rushford, Minnesota, in 1870. He practiced here five years then came to Minneapolis. He was married to Josephine Fanske, from Bergen, Norway in 1869.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BENJAMIN, F. was born in Connecticut in 1839, and at the age of twenty-two went to California and engaged in mining for two years, when he returned to Connecticut. In 1874 he came to Minneapolis and opened a saloon. He and Ella M. Spaulding were married in 1872. Their children are Frederick and Gracie.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BENNER, WEBSTER was born in Lincoln county, Maine. He came to Minneapolis in 1870 and was in the drug business until 1880, when he originated the Minneapolis Soap Works. He has a partner in business, the firm name being Pomeroy and Benner. They make Shipments throughout the northeast. Mr. Benner was married in Maine, and has one son living at Waldboro, Lincoln county.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BENNETT, S. J. born at Mineral Point, Wisconsin. He lived at that place until sixteen years of age, when he went to Colorado. After spending three years there he returned to Wisconsin; thence to Minnesota, and in 1874 settled in Minneapolis, engaging in the coopering business. He married Nancy King, in 1872. Enlisted, in August, 1862, in the Twenty-first Wisconsin, served one year, and was discharged for disability.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BENTON, C. Henry of the firm of Benton, Benton and Roberts, attorneys at law, was born at Lunenburgh, Essex county, Vermont, in 1841. His parents and family moved to Guildhall, Vermont, and the same year his father came west to secure a home, but soon died at Rockford, Illinois. In 1860, C. H. entered the Vermont University at Burlington, and in 1861 enlisted in the Fifth Vermont volunteers, being promoted to first lieutenant and mustered out September 19th, 1864. Soon after, he entered the Albany law school, from which he graduated in 1866 and commenced practicing in Troy, Vermont. He married Miss Flora Hadley, who died in 1869. Two years later Mr. Benton came to Minneapolis, where he was married to Jeanette Graham of this city, who bore him two children, Christine and Harry.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BENTON, COL. R. C. was born at Waterford, Caledonia county, Vermont, May 13th, 1830. At twenty-one he entered the University of Vermont, and graduated with the class of 1854. He taught school at Johnson, Vermont, two years and was there admitted to the bar in 1856. He practiced law until 1861, when he entered the array as captain of company "D," Fifth Vermont infantry. In 1862 he was promoted to the office of lieutenant colonel of the Eleventh Vermont and remained in service until 1864. He participated in some of the principal battles, being wounded June 9tb, at the battle of Savage Station. After the war he returned to Vermont and again practiced his profession. In 1867 he removed to St. Albans, Vermont, and in 1875 located in Minneapolis. He was assistant secretary of Vermont state senate in 1856-1857, county attorney of Lamoille county in 1860-1861, and a member of Vermont state board of education in 1874. He married Miss Sara Leland in 1856. Their children are: Lucy and Mary. Two children have died.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 273

BERENS, Peter a native of Germany, was born in 1829. He removed to Hennepin county in 1855, having lived one year in Illinois, and settled near Long Lake, being at that time farther west than any other settler in this part of the county. He has since lived here.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 281

BERG, John was born in Sweden, July 16th, 1846. He worked on a farm until fifteen, in a flouring mill ten years, and at carpenter work two years. He came to America, arriving at Red Wing, Minnesota, in May, 1868, when he went to brick-making. In 1871 he was employed by the Minneapolis Brick Company. In 1872, he was in Bismarck, brick-making. In 1874-1876 worked for Union Brick Company, in Minneapolis. In the fall of 1876, worked for R. C. Todd. In 1879-1880, was a partner with Johnson Brothers. He married Miss Clara C. Anderson, of Minneapolis, January, 1875. They have three children. Charles E., F. Alida and Oscar T.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BERMANN, A. is a Russian by birth, and was born May 29th, 1853. He came to Minneapolis in November 1879, and was engaged in peddling until 1880, when he became a partner of L. Bloustein. They are now known as the firm of Bermann and Bloustein, and deal in new and second hand goods. He was married October 10th, 1877.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 347

BERNSTEIN, W. a native of Germany, was born in 1826. He emigrated to America in 1848, and for three years worked in Baltimore, as machinist in the railroad shops; then he removed to Washington and worked seven years in the navy yard; thence to Illinois, and was employed in the car shops at Aurora, until 1869, when he came to this state. In 1856 he married Catharine Faul who has borne him six children. Mr. Bernstein purchased his present farm in 1869, and is engaged in gardening and fruit raising.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BERRY, A. C. captain of police, was born February 21st 1830, at Pittsfield Maine. He settled in Minneapolis in 1866, and being a carpenter, at once commenced that business, and continued in it until appointed on the police force, in 1867. Since his promotion to the rank of captain, in 1877, he has discharged his duties with credit to himself and to the general satisfaction of the force at his command. He was married in Penobscot county, Maine, to Jennie M. Whitcomb, November 30th 1854. Their two children, Ida and Charles, have died.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 511

BERRY, Frederick was born in Brooklyn, Hennepin county, Minnesota, in 1857. At the age of sixteen he commenced teaching. He entered the State University of Minnesota in 1874, and graduated after a six years course. In July 1880, same year, he was taken as book-keeper in the money order department of the Minneapolis post office. He commenced studying law, in the office of Morrison and Fitch, in September, 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BERRY, John one of the pioneers of Hennepin county, was born in Buxton Maine, in 1801. Was engaged in farming and carpenter work until he came to St. Anthony, in 1851, and has followed farming most of the time since. He was the first man to raise a crop on the west side, having made a claim on section 31, east of Cedar, Lake, in April, 1851, and resided there until 1857, since which time he has lived in the city. Mr. Berry fell, while engaged in carpenter work at Bangor, Maine, and shattered his right arm, and by a similar accident, twelve years since his right leg was injured. He married Hannah Bunker, February 12th, 1826. The children living are: Mrs. W. A. Rowell, of this city, Mrs. D. L. Paine of Indianapolis, Indiana, and Mark T., surveyor and superintendent for Dean and Harrison. Mrs. Berry died April 23d, 1879. Mr. Berry lived with his son, Mark T., until his death, which occurred in April, 1881.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 511

BERRY, Jonathan C. was born and lived in Buxton, York county, Maine, until twelve years of age when he removed to Grove, Allegany county New York, and learned blacksmithing. He spent six years in the Galena, Illinois, lead mines; then started for California, with team and wagon, in 1852, and succeeded in reaching there August 27th. He engaged in teaming and mining until 1854. During that year he bought and run the first threshing machine in the state. He came to St. Anthony in 1855, and purchased an interest in a, plow factory and made the first plow manufactured in the state. He was married at White Oak Springs, Wisconsin, in 1858, to Miss Amanda Beckwith, who was born at Noblesville, Indiana. They have two children: Frank and Flora.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 511

BIDWELL, E. L. of the firm of Bidwell and Company, is a native of Massachusetts, and, was born March 15th, 1856. He became a resident of Northfield, Minnesota, in 1859, where he remained six years; then came to Minneapolis, where he received his education, and has since resided.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 510

BIDWELL, Hermanl was born in New York, March 2d, 1851. He commenced in the milling business at Galesville, Wisconsin, in 1870, and remained there five-years; then removed to La Crosse, remaining four years. He became a resident of Minneapolis in July 1879, and has since been engaged in milling. His marriage with Lue Curtis, occurred November 7th, 1875. They are the parents of one child, Julia.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 511

BIGBY, G. W. was born in Pennsylvania, in 1845, and in early life learned the carpenter's trade with his father. He came to Minnesota in l857, and settled in Freeborn county, where he remained until July, 1880, when he became a citizen of Minneapolis. He has worked at his trade many years, and is well established as a contractor, builder, and cabinet-maker.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 511

BIGGS, L. was born in Maryland, February 15th, 1836. He learned his trade as millwright at home, then removed to Indiana, where he spent ten years. He was wedded to Mary J. Lynn in 1863, who bore him two children, Elma and Roland. His wife died in August, 1870. After remaining a widower seven years, he married Annie Byers. They have one child, Mabel. Mr. Biggs came to Minneapolis in 1871. He was one of those who assisted in building the old "A" mill, and helped to rebuild the old "B" mill. He has been in the employ of Washburn and Company during the nine years of his citizenship.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 273

BILLS, Alden P. was born in Oneida county, New York, in 1818. In the year 1865 he moved to Hennepin county, settling at Lake Independence. He moved here in a lumber wagon, building bridges as he went. Arriving at his farm, they put up a stove, and ate their first meal on a dry goods box. Game was plenty at that time, and they did not suffer for food. Mrs. Bills was chased by a panther, that came so near she could distinctly hear its steps. Mr. Hills married Jeanette Purcell, of Ohio. They have two children now living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 511

BIRDWELL, J. W. was born September 10th, 1838, at Tuscumbia, Alabama. He moved to Minneapolis in 1871, and has remained here since. At the first call for volunteers he enlisted, and served in the war until mustered out at Trenton, Tennessee, in 1863. He was married, on his return to Julia Clift, of Illinois. She has borne him one child, Josephine. Mr. Birdwell is the Minneapolis manager of the business of the Victor Wheat Heater Company.

 

Authored and submited by Patty Guimont, from genealogical research and personal knowlege. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~patty0802

BISTODEAU, Dr. Louis, (1822-1902) came to Dayton from St. Paul, in June 1855.  He was a graduate of the Quebec Medical Board of Examiners and he has been the only practicing physician in the town for thirty seven years.  He has raised a family of fifteen living children, thus setting a good example, which was exceedingly well followed by the early settlers.

Parents: Jean Marie Baptiste and Marie Theresa Naflette
Shortly after marriage, Doctor Louis and  his wife  Sara Emeline Brule traveled from Trois Rivers Quebec, Canada to a little village called St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota.  They arrived there on July 8, 1854.  Doctor Bistodeau was the first doctor of Dayton, MN.

Doctor Bistodeau traveled from Minneapolis to Dayton by walking and riding an Indian pony to care for the sick, later the town's people gave him a carriage.

Later Doctor Bistodeau moved his wife and family from Minneapolis to Dayton to be closer to his patients.  There was not as much money in those days, so sometimes the doctor accepted vegetables, eggs or whatever they had for his fee.  Dr. Bistodeau delivered many babies and cared for the sick and injured throughout his life.  He was always happy helping where it was necessary.  His black doctor's bag is now in the Hennepin County Historical Society (Minneapolis).   His wife Emelina created a quilt during the Civil War along with five other women, which is also on display at the Historical Society.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 296

BLACK. H. C. born in New Hanover county, North Carolina, in 1845. He learned the trade of wagon making. In 1875 he came to Hennepin county, settled in Osseo and established a wagon shop, taking E. H. Chandler as partner; this partnership was dissolved in 1879, and Mr. Black prosecuted the business alone until 1880, when he took two partners. In 1868 he was married to Julia Hancock. They have five children now living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 347

BLAISDELL, Robert was born in 1803, at Peacham, Vermont. He was raised as a farmer, came to Saint Anthony in 1852, and took, by preemption, the farm where he now resides. Mr. Blaisdell attended the meeting at which Minneapolis was made a township, and helped to elect the first Town Board.. He has never missed a meeting since that time He also assisted in building the first school-house in the township. He married Miss Mary Chandler, in Maine. They are the parents of seven children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 347

BLAISDELL, Robert Jr. a native of Aroostook county, Maine, was born May 4th, 1832. In 1846 he went to Wisconsin, and engaged in the lumber business at the head of Green Bay. In 1852 he removed to this state, and made a claim of 160 acres, which is a part of his present farm. He also owns, with his father, 360 acres in McLeod county. He too, attended the first election, and helped to build the first school-house In the township. His wife was Elmira Taunt, who has borne him six children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 347

BLAISDELL, William was born at Belfast, Maine, in 1834. In 1851 he moved to Minnesota, and five years later preempted the farm he now owns. From 1863 until the fall of 1864, he was mining in California, Idaho, and Montana; then returned, and for one year was in charge of a lumber interest in Michigan. He now owns 20,000 acres of timberland in Wisconsin. Mr. Blaisdell acted as clerk at the first annual election held on this side of the river. There were only fourteen votes cast, four of them by the Blaisdell family. In 1861 he enlisted at the first call, and served until the regiment disbanded. He was married in 1865, to Miss Jennie Fletcher.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 511

BLAKELEY, David manager of the Tribune, was born in Franklin county, Vermont, in 1834. The family moved from there to Syracuse, New York, in 1838, where, at the age of thirteen, he entered the printing office of the Daily Star. In that office and that of the Journal, he thoroughly mastered the typographical art. After completing his apprenticeship, returned to Vermont and devoted five years to study. In 1857 he left the University of Vermont, and came to Minnesota, where he entered the profession of journalism, starting three newspapers. In 1860, was elected chief clerk in the house of representatives, and re-elected the following year. He was then appointed superintendent of public instruction by Governor Ramsey, and at expiration of term, was returned to the office by election. He contributed largely to the organization of the common school system of Minnesota. In 1865, he, with his brother, Major C. H. Blakeley, purchased the Chicago Evening Post and took editorial charge of that paper, remaining until April, 1874, when he disposed of his interest in the Evening Post and succeeded to the editorship of the St. Paul Pioneer. One year later, he conceived the idea of consolidating the Pioneer and the Press, which was soon accomplished, and during his service with the consolidated Pioneer Press, was jointly, with Mr. Wheelock, in editorial charge of the paper. The Minneapolis Tribune, having subsequently been added, Mr. Blakeley removed to Minneapolis, the better to represent the journal in this city. Finally becoming convinced that there wag a fine future for journalism in Minneapolis, he severed his connection with the St. Paul establishment entirely, and taking the Minneapolis Evening Tribune in charge, he has maintained his relations with that journal since. On May llth, 1880, in company with Gen. A. B. Nettleton, he established the Morning Tribune, thereby, giving to Minneapolis, a first-class metropolitan journal, of which her citizens have had every reason to be proud.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BLAKEMAN, L. V. N. who is a native of New York city, came to this place in 1869, and was engaged in the mercantile business until 1874, when he became a partner of G. Menzel, in the foundry business.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BLAKEMAN, William one of the earliest settlers of this locality, was born in Prussia, April 18th, 1828. He came to the United States in 1848, and settled in La Fayette, Indiana, where he engaged in upholstering and carriage trimming until 1856, when he removed to Saint Anthony. He was the first upholsterer here. He retired from labor in 1868, and has since lived on the fruits of his industry. He married Magdalene Kretz, of Germany. They have five children living: Mary, Lizzie, Frank, Charles, and Fred.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


Frank Blesi

BLESI, Frank  son of John and Margaret Blesi was born in Jan.1870 in the New Schwanden area of the second generation. Frank had a farm on Elm Creek Road and Elm Creek ran through the land to Hayden Lake. Frank married Ursula Bertha Arma- da Kuschke of Pommern,Prussa, Germany in 1892 in New Schwanden. She went by her second name of Bertha. There were no children born of this union. The last picture  taken of Frank was in Anoka,MN. on the Rum River bridge crossing in Jan.1950.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com


Fridolin & Anna Kathrine Blesi
(Click to enlarge)

BLESI, Fridolin  first came to America in 1849 and returned to Switzerland in 1851. It is not known if he visited WI. or MN. at this time, but he may have been the fore-runner to many immigrants who came later on. Fridolin and wife Anna Katharine nee Streiff came to St. Paul, MN in 1855 and stayed there until 1863 when they purchased the home and land in the N.W corner of Champlin township on the Mississippi River from Francis Thorndyke. There were 4 children born of this union. His son Emil Blesi farmed the land and later Emil's son, Leonard Blesi, farmed the land until it was sold to Stanley Leathers in the 1960's. Fridolin and Katharine Blesi took an active part in the St.Fridolin's Lutheran Church of New Schwanden.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com



Harry Herman & Sadie Blesi
(Click to enlarge)

BLESI, Harry Herman,  was born on March 9,1889 in New Schwanden, Dayton Township, Henn. County, MN. Third generation. He was confirmed at the St. Fridolin Church of New Schwanden, Hennepin County, MN. on Sep.25,1904 by Pastor Henry Hartig who was the Pastor of St. Petrie Lutheran Church of Minneapolis, MN. Harry attended the grade school of Champlin, MN.  In 1911 and 1912 he worked on the Minneapolis Streetcar System as a motorman until he married on Nov.2,1912 to Sadie Mary Signor,of Randall, MN. Morrison County and continued farming his father's farm on the south end of Hayden Lake. He built a new barn in 1927 of which Sadie's brother, Charles Signor, helped to build. Harry and Sadie built a new home in 1937 and retired from farming in 1938 when his son  Gordon W. Blesi took over the farm. Harry died while driving his car on Washington Ave No. and Plymouth St. in Minneapolis, MN. from a massive stroke on hIs way home on Jan.8,1960. Sadie lived there until 1980 when she sold her home to the Hennepin County Park Reserve which is now contained in the Elm Creek Park Reserve. In 1985 Sadie broke her left hip and  remained in the nursing home until her death on Jan.6, 2003 at the age of 109 years. Gordon Blesi died in 1997. Clair Blesi died in 1998  at Grand Forks, ND. Jean Blesi Leathers is still living at the age of 90 at Stanton, CA. not far from her daughter, Patrica Oslund, of Cypress, CA. one son, Wayne C. Blesi, is living in Robinsdale, MN.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com



Henry Peter & Magdalena Blesi
(Click to enlarge)

BLESI, Henry Peter  was born on Nov.10,1859 in New Schwanden, Dayton Township, Henn. County, MN. Son of Peter & Margaretha Blesi, second generation. He married Magdalena Mueller of Rohrbach, Canton Bern, Switzerland in 1887 and took over hIs Father, Peter Blesi's, farm when he moved to Minneapolis, MN. Magdalena came in 1885 with her brother, Theodore Mueller, and 3 Sisters;  Rose, who married Martin J. Petran of Morgan Hill, CA, and moved there to live there on Oct.13,1909, Maria, who married Charles Rychner of Platte Township in Morrison County, MN., and Alice Mueller, who married Roderick Daniel Scott of Dayton Township, Henn. Co. MN. and then moved to Little Falls, MN. All had families except for Rose & Martin Petran who died in Santa Clara, CA.. Henry Blesi continued with the farming and also made Swiss cheeses and maple syrup from the sugar bush trees. Their children were Harry Herman, Phillip Theodore and Helen Magdalena Blesi who remained single and lived in her father's home in Champlin, MN. with her brother, Phillip Blesi, who fought in the World War I and gave his good fishing friend, Emil LeBonne, his home when he died. Only Phillip and Helen are buried in the St. Fridolin Cemetery, New Schwanden, Champlin, MN.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


Herman & Sophia Blesi
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BLESI, Herman Peter, son of Peter and Margaretha Blesi was born on Jan.29,1871 in New Schwanden (second generation) in Dayton Township, Hennepin County, MN. He became a logger during the great logging period in the forests of Northern MN. On Sep.10,1900 he married Sophia Marie Dahm Pohl of Klausdorf-Holstein Germany born on 25 Jan.1864, and came to America in 1884.. Herman was also a good horseman to take care of horses which he learned from His Father on the farm. He worked for the city of Minneapolis street dept. driving a water sprinkling wagon and would haul ice on a sled in the winter.  After his retirement He would use a whittling bench to make wood items like toad stools and lawn ornaments. In 1937 they sold their home on Humbolt Ave No. and went out to Tigard, OR. for 2 years and then returned to Minneapolis again and lived on Girard Ave. No. the rest of their lives. Herman  and Sophia had no children. Herman died on Sep.27,1950 and His wife Sophia died on Aug.19,1951 and both lie at rest in Crystal Lake Cemetery of Minneapolis,MN.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


John and Margaret Blesi
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BLESI, Johannes, "John".

John Blesi came from Schwanden,Switzerland and settled in New Schwanden.MN in 1855 and built a cabin. He fought in the Civil War from the start of the conflict of Bull Run. He was wounded and placed in the VRC of 1 year. He had helped General Grant off the battle field. For his bravery he was given a picture of himself by order of President Grant in 1882 when he came to MN. to see the development of the Railroad of the N.W. passage and only went as far as St. Cloud, MN and stopped at Anoka to visit all the Civil War vets of the area. Pres, Grant went to a large hotel on Lake Calhoun of which he gave them an invitation to come and celebrate with him for 1 week. But only John Blesi attended the meeting. John was mustered out at the end of the war in 1865. He married Margaret Pourrier of Belbort, France who first came to Canada and then to MN., at St.John The Baptist Catholic Church on May 21,1865 at Dayton, MN. There were 14 children born of this union. John Blesi's sons, Albert and Michael Blesi, divided the farm land into 2 parcels, Albert and his wife Annie, nee  Reinke, Blesi had 8 daughters and no sons. Michael and Dora, nee Christiansen, had  9 children. Michael's son Wayne Wendell Blesi continued with the farming of which some of the land was sold to the Elm Creek Park Reserve and the remaining land was farmed by His sons.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com


John Peter Blesi
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BLESI, John Peteri son of Peter and Margaretha Blesi was born on May 25,1856 in the New Schwanden area. He lived on farm land that Peter gave him that was warranted to him for serving in the Civil War. John married Anna Gigli on Jan.24,1881 who came from Bern, Switzerland with her parents Frederick John and Rosina nee Shenk Gigli . Anna was born on July 14,1858.They lived in the Champlin Township area and attended the St. Fridolin Evangelical Lutheran Church of New Schwanden where they were Confirmed and married. John raised a lot of cabbages and he was given a nick-name of cabbage John. There were 7 children born of this union, 1.Frederick who remained single, 2, Margaret married William F. Cooper of Minnespolis, 3. Rose married John Romlin of Minneapolis, 4. Mollie married Thomas Kearney from Wisconsin, 5.Peter married Wima Marjorie Baum from Backus, MN. 6. Arthur married Josephine Holthus from Corcoran, MN. and Florence married Charles Goodrich of Champlin, MN. John and Anna are both buried in the St, Fridolin Cemetery also known as New Schwanden (Swiss) Cemetery of Champlin, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


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BLESI, Melchoir

Melchoir Blesi came from Schwanden, Switzerland to America and to New Schwanden, MN in 1854 and helped build the cabins in the area. He enlisted in the Civil War on Jan.17, 1862.  Being that he was under age his brother as his guardian had to sign for him to enlist. He died on Dec.6,1862 from typhoid fever from drinking impure water likely from puddles which many soldiers did. He is buried at the National Cemetery at Nashville,TN. in Section-B grave No.6913. There were no pictures taken of him for lack of photo equipment.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com


Niclaus (Nick) Blesi
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BLESI, Niclaus (Nick) was born in Schwanden, Switzerland on Oct.8,1836. He came to New Schwanden Swiss settlement in 1860 leaving his first wife Barbara Boniger in Switzerland. He married Ida Zimmermann a second cousin in 1862. They lived on land on the north side of Mud Lake in Maple Grove Township. Two of their children died young and are buried on the homestead. A son John E. was born on Jul.10,1865 and a daughter Margaret Blesi was born on Jan.10,1868 and married Frederick Zimmermann Sr. in 1886 and had 2 children. Nick Blesi had a beer joint on the north side of Mud Lake in this secluded area and was shut down likely by Sheriff Earl Brown because it became too rowdy. They also lived across the road in Dayton Township which became the extension of 109th Ave. no that ended what became Pineview  Rd. now closed by the Elm Creek Park Reserve which took over all the land of the Swiss pioneers who settled in New Schwanden, MN. Nick died in 1910 and Ida Rosina died on Dec.22,1917. Both are buried in St. Fridolin Cemetery also known as the New Schwanden (Swiss) Cemetery Champlin, Hennepin County, Minnesota,

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


Peter and Margaretha Blesi
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BLESI, PETER,
 From 1853 Peter and His wife Margaretha "Zimmermann" Blesi set out from Switzerland to come to the USA to make a new life for themselves. Arrived at New Orleans in Oct. 1853 and traveled up the Mississippi River and Ohio River to Chicago and visited Milwaukee, WI and New Glarus, WI. to find land. Being out of money they worked their way to St. Anthony and arrived in April 1854.They found land near Champlin, MN 2 1/2 miles S.W. which they named New Schwanden.In the last survey of Hennepin Co. by Hardin Nolan in Sep. 1854 they found several cabins with paths leading from one cabin to the other. The first log Church was built in 1866 as well as establishing the St. Fridolin's Cemetery. The Church was named the First German Evangelical Lutheran Church of New Schwanden of which the founder was Peter Blesi. The land for the cemetery was given by Fridolin Zopfi. Peter Blesi moved into the cabin on March 25,1855 with several other settlers following. Several of these pioneers fought in the Civil War and returned to their loved Community of which only one man died at Nashville, TN.  Melchoir Blesi, brother of Peter Blesi from typhoid fever. The Community thrived and grew up to the 1960's. Peter and his wife Margaretha moved to Minneapolis in 1887 and his son Henry continued with the farming. Harry Blesi, son of Henry, then farmed the land from 1912 to 1937 when his son Gordon Blesi continued with the farm until 1965 when the farm was sold to the Hennepin Co. Park Reserve and is contained in the Elm Creek Perk Reserve which includes all the lands of these early Swiss Pioneers within 3,600 acres. There has been Memorials established in Honor of these brave Swiss Pioneers.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com

BLESI, Rudolf

Rudolf Blesi came from Schwanden,Switzerland to New Schwanden, MN in 1860 with other family members. Peter Blesi gave him a 40 acre tract of land in Champlin Township on the north end of Bond Lake where he built a cabin. He married Anna Shank of Anoka, MN in Anoka County on March 1,1869 at the St.Fridolin's Lutheran Church by Pastor V.W.Rehkoph. Their witnesses were Peter Blesi, his brother, and William Blesi a distant cousin from another family line who later on settled in Renwick, IA. and changed his last name to Blesie. Anna and Rudolf Blesi left MN. in 1875 and went to CA. where they had a chicken farm. He wrote letters to his nephew Herman Blesi of Minneapolis,MN. But in 1926 the letters quit coming which is likely when Rudolf died. There are no known children of this marriage and there were no letters kept so that their location would be revealed. Up to this date of 2006 there  are no death records for Rudolf or Anna Blesi or as to where they lived or buried.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BLITZ, Adolph M. D. was born in Prussia, February 10th, 1845. He moved to America in 1864, and studied medicine at the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery. From this institution he graduated in 1873. He removed to Nashville, Tennessee, in May, 1874, and while there he became a member of the Nashville Medical Society, Davidson County Medical Society, and Tennessee State Medical Society. He is a member of the American Medical Association, International Medical, Ophthalmological and otological Congress; in March, 1877, Doctor Blitz in company with others, founded the Nashville Medical College, which afterward became the medical department of the University of Tennessee. On account of failing health, he resigned his position and removed to Minneapolis in 1880. Doctor Blitz was married in 1877, to Anna D. Wicks, of New Bedford, Massachusetts. They have two daughters: Nellie and Bertha.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BLOOD, J. W. was born March 16th, 1845, at Boston, Massachusetts. He moved with his parents to Janesville, Wisconsin, in 1855. He received an academic education at Milton, Wisconsin, and at Chicago, where he learned the trade of machinist. He came to Minneapolis in 1874, and has been engaged as foreman in the machine shops of the Harvester Works since. He was married to Miss E. W. Cragg, of Cincinnati, in 1874. They have one child; Meda.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BLOUSTEIN, L. of the firm of Bermann and Bloustein, was born in Poland, 1839. His early life was spent in Scotland, and a few years later he began business in England. In 1879 he came to America, and the next year took as a partner, Mr. A. Bermann. They now deal in gents' furnishing goods, and have a large stock.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BOARDMAN, C. N. dentist, was born at Waterloo, Yates county, New York, January 6th, 1841. He was educated principally at Mount Vernon, and studied dentistry at Cincinnati four years. He commenced his practice in Columbus, Indiana. Coming to Minneapolis, In 1872, he at once established himself as a dentist, and has been in continuous practice here since. Miss Elizabeth LeDuc of this city became his wife in 1874.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BOARDMAN, W. M. was born at Rochester, New York, October 4th, 1857. During early life he lived on a farm, later he was engaged in the grocery business. In 1876, he came to this city and opened a restaurant. Mr. M. C. Tate joined him in this business in October, 1880, when they bought the restaurant, which they now ran at 214 Nicollet Avenue. He married Sarah McCue, July 20th, 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 512

BODE, A. H. was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1838. He came to America and located at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1848 and attended the public schools of that city until 1853, when he entered a lawyer's office. In the summer of 1855 he removed to Madison and went to work for the LaCrosse and Milwaukee Railway as warehouseman at Richfield, and was afterwards agent at Horicon for four yean. Returned to Milwaukee, and in 1863, went into the Merchant's bank. In August, 1865, he came to Minnesota as general freight and ticket agent of the Minnesota Central Railway, and after its purchase by the Milwaukee and St. Paul, remained as general agent until 1871. He was then engaged with a construction company, until 1873, since which time he has been with the Minneapolis and Saint Louis Railway. He was married at Horicon, Wisconsin, December 26th, 1858. They have eight children: Carrie F., Addie C., Willie F., Mabel, Freddie C., Bessie I., Grace E., and J. Henry.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 513

BOFFERDING, John one of the early settlers, was born in Luxembourg, August 29th, 1826. He came to the United States in 1850, and settled first at Sauk City, Wisconsin. In 1853 he started on a prospecting trip which ended in his settling in Minneapolis in 1856. Here he worked at his trade, that of carpenter, until 1875, when he began the grocery business and has since continued it. He was married in 1862 to Katrina Frius, of Germany, who bore him three children. Those living are Maggie and William.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 513

BOFFERDING, Nicholas brother of the above, and who also came to Minneapolis in 1856, was born at Luxembourg, August 2lst, 1830. He worked at the carpenter trade here until 1875, and has since worked with his brother, Mr. John Bofferding.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 513

BOHAN, T. M. a native of Ireland, was born June 29th, 1832. He came to the United States in 1848, and remained in New York one year, then removed to Milwaukee. There he learned the shoemaking trade, at which he worked until 1855; then he moved to St. Anthony and opened a shop and two years later engaged as foreman for Wensinger. In 1877 Mr. Bohan, in company with J. A. Kennedy started in the boot and shoe trade. One year later Mr. Kennedy sold his interest to Mr. McNeice, the present partner. Mr. Bohan was married to Anna Shortell, of Milwaukee, in 1857. They have seven children: Mary, John, Annie, Timothy, Thomas, James, and Katie.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 281

BOHANON, John C. was born August 23d, 1817, in Alexander, Maine, where he followed the lumbering business until 1851, when he came to St. Anthony. March 26th, 1852, he moved to the land he now occupies, section 4, and was the second man who settled here. He has been engaged in farming and lumbering since he came to Minnesota. Married, in 1840, Miss Lucretia McKenzie, of Calais, Maine. January 11th, 1853, his wife died, and was the first white adult buried in this town. . November 19th, 1856, he married Sophia H. Longfellow. Nine children are living: S. L., Charles, and H. Willard, by his first wife; John L., Annie T., Frederick N., James M., Sarah B., and Ira B., by second marriage.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 513

BOLLIER, George F. was born in Switzerland, June 18th, 1819. He learned the trade of shoemaker in his native country and worked at it until 1856, when he emigrated to the United States, coming direct to St. Anthony, where he has since resided. In 1858 he opened a boot and shoe store and has added to his stock from time to time. Mr. Bollier was married in 1856, to Sarah Allemann, of Switzerland, who died in 1864. He was married in 1866, to Paulina Diedrich. Their children are: William and Hattie.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 513

BOLTON, N. H. was born ten miles South of Cleveland, Ohio, February 10th, 1839. He remained with his parents until twenty-seven years of age and there acquired a knowledge of milling and manufacturing. He came to Minneapolis in 1872 and at once commenced in his present business, that of manufacturing mill machinery. Mr. Bolton was married in 1865 at Farmington, Washington county, Wisconsin, to Mary L. Norton; have had three children: Celeste, Gracie and Ada.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 513

BONFOY, S. was born in Montgomery county, New York, in 1817. At the age of fifteen he learned the woolcarding business. Fifteen years later he went to Georgia, remaining at Columbus eleven years, when he removed to Roswell, Georgia. Here he was engaged as superintendent of a wool factory. When General Sherman passed through on his march to the sea, the factory was burned. He removed to Indiana and remained nine years. In 1874 he came to this city and again engaged in the wool-carding business.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 252

BONJOUR, A. born in Switzerland, 1835, emigrated to America in 1872. Settled in Chanhassen, Carver county, Minnesota, where he remained for two years, when he moved to Excelsior, where he has since resided.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


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BONK, JOHN  John Bonk was born in Germany in 1866. He came and lived in Minneapolis, MN. He married about
1890 to Maria (Mary) Anne Blesi, daug
hter of Peter & Margaretha Blesi of New Schwanden, Dayton Township, MN.
who was born on Apr.19,1868. There were 3 children born of this union. 1. Arthur Bonk, May 1,1895, 2. Theodore
Bonk Jan.24,1907  & 3. George F. Bonk born on Feb.15,1908. Mary Bonk died on Dec.11,1940 and John Bonk died
on Oct.31,1918 of cancer at the age of 52. They are both buried at the Crystal Lake Cemetery in Minneapolis, MN.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.
Page 216

BOOTH, John E. was born in Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, May 12th, 1832. He remained in England, engaged in the manufacture of fancy woolen goods, until 1854, when he came to the United States and located in New Jersey. He remained in that State about six months and removed to Albany, N. Y. Thence in March, 1855, to Brooklyn, and from there to Toronto, Canada. In 1856 he removed to Boston, thence to Philadelphia where he was married to Mary Beaumont, who died in the fall of the same year.

In 1858, his health failing, he returned to England, where he was engaged as florist for eleven years. In 1859 he was married to Mary Morrell, and in 1870 he returned to America, and came directly to Minneapolis, engaging as florist and gardener for Wyman Elliott. After remaining with him eighteen months, he leased the grounds and hot houses for five years and carried on the business for himself. In 1877 he purchased three acres of ground at Minnehaha, which he laid out and improved as a landscape garden. This garden is valued at $10,000. In 1880 he leased the Minnehaha hotel and grounds, and is now conducting the same. The children are: Herbert M., Annie J., Frederic E., and Arthur C.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 513

BOSTWICK, L. was born in Toronto, Canada, June, 1815. He moved to St. Anthony, accompanied by his wife and daughters, in 1850. The year following, he was elected justice of the peace, which office he held until 1860. He was elected, under very peculiar circumstances, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of I. I. Lewis. At that time there was a "Maine liquor law," under which a person was indicted for opening a saloon in St. Anthony, and the case was brought before Mr. Lewis, who resigned rather than to try the case. In l871, Judge Bostwick decided to retire from active life and enjoy the fruits of his labor. He has been one of the most active citizens of this now flourishing metropolis, and from its earliest growth identified with its interests.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 518

BOSWORTH, William was born in Washington county, Maine, December 16th, 1857. In 1857 he came to St. Anthony and engaged in the lumbering trade until 1875, when he was appointed on the police form as patrol, and in May, 1876, was appointed sergeant, and served in that capacity until 1877, and since as patrol. He was married to Miss Maria Craig, at St. Anthony, August, 1867. Their children are: George, Fred, and Eva May.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 513

BOTTINEAU, Pierre was born January 1st, 1817, at a place on Turtle river, Dakota Territory, once called Rats Point, but afterwards named Bottineau's Point from its being the residence of his father, Joseph Bottineau; who was engaged with the Northwestern Fur Company. The mother of Pierre Bottineau, was a native of the Ojibwa tribe, whose father was a captive Dakota, and mother an Ojibwa. By this marriage there were several children, with only one of whom, Pierre, we have to do. In 1816, one year before the birth of Pierre, hostilities arose between the Hudson Bay Company, the old company established in 1670, under a grant by Charles II, of England, to Prince Rupert and others, and the Northwestern Company., These were both English companies. The Red River settlement was founded by Lord Selkirk, a Scottish peer under a grant from the Hudson Bay Company. The North-western Company, whose head-quarters were Canada traded by the way of the lakes, and had virtually preempted this territory before the Selkirk colony arrived and did not recognize their claim as a part of the Hudson Bay Company's territory, as this company had never before extended their lines so far south. The Hudson Bay Company transported goods by way of Hudson Bay. After the establishment of the Red River settlement in 1812, petty strife began, which in 1816, culminated in open hostilities. Lord Selkirk had demanded troops from the Governor General for the protection of his colony without avail, but instead, was enjoined against repetition of hostilities. In spite of this injunction some more blood was shed, but at last, as neither party received the support of the government, an amalgamation took place, and the united company controlled the country. In consequence of these hostilities, the little colony of Red River was greatly weak ened by emigration to the territory of the United States and Canada.

Pierrie Bottineauls father was commanded by the North-western Company to take part in the struggle but he absented himself on one of his hunting expeditions. On his return he was imprisoned, but owing to his influence with the tribe from which he had taken his wife, he was. soon released, as worse troubles were liable to arise.

Amid these bustling scenes, in a wild country, among Indians, and half-breeds more dangerous than the Indians themselves, Pierre Bottineau was born. He was early trained by his father for the hunt. He possessed a strong frame and rugged constitution, and became a skillful horseman, and a sure marksman with a rifle, learning, as well as inheriting these qualities from his father, who was unsurpassed in the chase. His father died when he was fourteen years of age, and LeCompte, a famous guide, but lame in consequence of an injury, pleased with the early accomplishments and promise of the boy, took him to live with him, promising to instruct him in the mysteries of his art. LeCompto was at this time the only man conversant with the country, and familiar with the duties of a guide. He held out brilliant prospects, of high wages, ending in a fortune, especially because he needed the sure foot, strong arm and quick eye of this young half-breed. During the years 1832-1833 Pierre made a few short trips in company with LeCompte, carrying messages between trading posts, but his first long trip was in 1834, at the age of seventeen. LeCompte was then employed by the Hudson Bay Company to carry messages and the mail from Fort Garry to Fort Snelling, and Pierre accompanied him. They started the first of November and reached their destination December 27th. Communication was difficult and expensive, and sometimes not undertaken oftener than once a year. They went down on the east bank of the Red River, and after eight days reached Red Lake River, which it was necessary for them to cross, though now very high and full of drifting ice. A feeble old man named Alard, went with them, and a pony with a Red River cart carried the man, baggage and provisions. A raft was quickly built and the cart and its contents were safely transferred to the other side by Pierre and Alard. They next returned for Le Compte and the pony, the current carrying them down some distance at each crossing. On attempting to cross again, with all hands and the pony, their clumsy raft foundered on a stump, and was soon piled with ice so that the upper end was submerged, and the lower end stuck up at a sharp angle. The situation was critical and promised at the best, a cold bath to all.

Here Pierre proved himself equal to the emergency, for cutting loose a few pieces of timber he secured them together by a cord made of buffalo hide, and making his two companions straddle the logs, since neither could swim. He took the chance of keeping on the little raft and poling it to shore. It floated, however, much farther, and struck a bend in the river that was frozen over, in consequence of there being less current. Here he was obliged to jump on the ice, after securing a long cord to the raft, one end of which he held in his hand. The ice would not bold the weight of a man, and Pierre went in, all over, in very deep water, but holding fast to the rope. When .he came up, he swam, breaking the ice before him, to the shore, and hauled his companions after him. They were fortunate in having dry suits at, the cart, and soon were all right in dry clothing. The pony was rescued, and they started again. After traveling four days they reached the Wild Rice river, and crossed the ice and encamped near its bank. By some means, here, the pony who had escaped narrowly one danger of drowning, got into this stream in the night and was drowned. In this dilemma it was decided, as Alard could not travel, to leave him in charge of the cart and stuff while Le Compte and. Pierre went on to Lac Traverse, a trading post of the American Fur Company, in charge of Mr. Moore. The journey, it was thought, would take four days. Pierre was loaded with bedding and provisions supposed to be sufficient for Le Compte and himself for the four days journey, and they set out. The lameness of Le Compte and the burden of Pierre rendered traveling slow, but it proved that the estimated distance of fifty or sixty miles, increased every day they traveled. Le Compte seemed not to be familiar with the country and arriving at Goose river. He called it the Cheyenne and the Elm he supposed the Wild Rice. They traveled thus for several days until their provisions were gone, hoping to reach the Bois des Sioux, where Le Compte declared he should recognize the country. On the eighth day they reached this river, having been already four days without food, and found a fresh Indian trail which they followed to the camp. It proved to be the camp of a party of Sioux numbering ten men with five tepees. The strangers were kindly received and their hunger appeased by a repast of otter and skunk meat. The next day they reached the trading post and obtaining a horse and man returned for Alard and their stuff. The old man's joy cannot be described, as the twentieth day after their departure he saw them returning. He had improvised a sled and loaded it with blankets and provisions, determined to start the next day, dragging his sled, trusting to a good fortune to take him to some habitation. After staying a few days at the post, Le Compte bought a horse of Mr. Moore and they proceeded to the trading post of Mr. Renville at Lac qui Parle and from this point they set out for Traverse des Sioux, another trading post distant four days journey. The post was in charge of Mr. Louis Le Blanc. Alard was left at Lac Traverse on account of the depth of snow and the difficulty of traveling. Trouble arose again in attempting to find Traverse des Sioux and the two companions were near starving, as their supplies had given out; when, fortunately, a coon was, killed and their hunger appeased. After traveling in a circuitous route for several days in search of the trading post, Pierre insisted upon taking a direct course for Fort Snelling or as near direct as the Minnesota river would conduct them, disregarding Traverse des Sioux altogether. It is a difficult matter to divert a guide from an old route but at last the point was conceded and they set out. On the following day they came on an Indian camp and were received in a friendly manner and directed on their way. It appeared that the guide was mistaken in reference to their location and they soon reached Traverse des Sioux, and without further accident arrived at Fort Snelling, December 28th, 1834.

Among those whom Pierre met at the Fort at this time he mentions Mr. N. W. Kittson. After spending a short time visiting friends and relations who bad formerly lived at Red River, he returned and for two years spent his time trapping in the winter and hunting buffaloes during the summer. Two hunts were usually made each year, one in the early summer and one later, about fall.

The outfit for these hunts was as follows: each hunter was supplied with a good hunting horse, gun and ammunition, and with two or three ponies, drawing each a Red River cart. The latter were used to carry their families and baggage, as well as to transport the results of the chase. Frequently these hunting parties would number several hundred hunters, besides their families.

After reaching the hunting grounds, each found occupation in killing the buffaloes, dressing, drying, cooking and making pemmican. Pemmican was an important article of food and merchandise with the Hudson Bay Company in furnishing supplies to their employees, and still continues to be used. It was made in the following manner. The lean buffalo meat was cut into thin strips, and a skillful woman would cut these strips round and round, making them quite long. These were spread in the sun during the day, and gathered at night in order to protect them from rain or dew until they became as dry as a bone. They were then placed over the fire to cook. After this the meat was beaten in a buffalo hide until completely pulverized, when it was mixed with melted fat and packed in skins for market. The lean and fat of two animals is condensed in one sack of pemmican. No salt or seasoning was used in its preparation, but properly prepared it would never spoil. Besides the process had driven out the water and so reduced the bulk that a very little would satisfy hunger and furnish food in the most condensed form for long journeys. When the carts were loaded with pemmican and hides the party returned from the hunt. Encounters with hostile Indians, and accidents frequently occurred which caused much danger and risk.

During the summer of 1835 Pierre made a trip to Hudson Bay in the employ of the Hudson Bay Company, and again the next summer a second trip. It will give some idea of the hardships to which voyageurs were subject if we state here the tests to which they were subjected before they were employed. A day and place was set for those who desired employment, to exhibit their powers of endurance. The load of a voyageur, two packages weighing about one hundred pounds each, was ready and the man who could carry the load to a certain goal and return without resting, in the quickest time, was counted the best man, and from those, most successful the employees were chosen. The Hudson Bay Company were haughty and overbearing to the natives and half-breeds, and treated them as "comme les betes," while the policy of the American Fur Company was much more liberal. This led many to transfer their trade to the American company.

December 1st, 1836, Pierre Bottineau married Genevieve Larance, daughter of John Baptiste Larance, a farmer of the Red River settlement.

A few months after, he undertook the memorable journey across the plains, as guide for Martin McLeod, and two companions, Parys and Hayes, from LaFourch, Red River colony, Territory of Hudson Bay, to Fort Snelling. The time estimated for the journey, was twenty-five days; of this, the journey to Lac Traverse was estimated at fifteen days, and the remainder of the journey ten days. The time consumed was, however, fifty days, and two of the party, Messrs. Parys and Hayes, perished by the way. The indomitable hardihood of Pierre Bottineau, alone, brought Mr. McLeod and himself through. They started with a dog trainee, moccasins and snow-shoes. The deep snow and the inexperience of the party retarded their progress.

They so frequently required their snow-shoes or moccasins loosened or tightened that the patience of Bottinean was taxed to its utmost, and short days journeys were accomplished. This was, however, only a small matter compared with the trouble that followed. Blizzards, cold, and want of food finally added to their miseries, until Hayes was lost in a storm and never seen again, and Parys, though found, was in such a frozen condition as to compel him to remain in a hut, carefully built and provided for his comfort, until horses could be sent for him from Lac Traverse. When the relief party arrived they found proof that death had ended his sufferings soon after their departure. Mr. Parys was a Polish gentleman who had served under Remarino, and left his country after the fall of Warsaw to avoid the fury of the Czar Nicholas I. Mr. Bottineau and the surviving traveler, Hon. Martin McLeod, arrived in safety at Fort Snelling, April 16th, 1837. May 4th, Bottineau started on his return on horse-back, took a traveler at Lac Traverse, and reached the Red River June 5th. Spent the summer and winter following, in the usual way, hunting and trapping. May, 1838, he undertook his next trip across the plains as guide for a large party, consisting of forty families, Swiss, French, and Scotch. This trip was accomplished without any remarkable incident, except that the Indians along their route became somewhat troublesome, and it was necessary to court their good will by distributing tobacco and flour among them in passing their villages. This was especially true because of the hostility of the Sioux toward the Chippewas, and the half-breeds of the north were associated with the Chippewa's. Four of these Sioux villages were passed at Lac Traverse, numbering eighty or ninety braves; two at Big Stone lake, numbering three hundred; two at Lac qui Parle, two hundred; one at Blue Earth, seventy one; at Redwood, one hundred; one at Traverse des Sioux, one hundred and fifty; one at Belle Plaine, fifty ; one at Little Rapids, one hundred; two at Shakopee, three hundred. These fifteen hundred warriors were often on the war path. At Minnehaha, Lake Calhoun and Pig's Eye there were five or six hundred more. Some of them, whose villages were not in their path, might, notwithstanding, be met on the plains. Owing to some accidents to their carts and one person, it was determined to send a messenger ahead to obtain from General H. H. Sibley his barge to transport the party from Traverse des Sioux. On arrival at this point the boat was found in readiness, and the party were successfully landed at Fort Snelling, though the time occupied from Traverse des Sioux was fourteen days, owing to low water.

At this point in his history Mr. Bottineau stops to pay a tribute to the kindness of Gen. Sibley, to whom he was frequently indebted for courteous and generous acts. He always extended this kindness to poor or rich, white man, Indian, or half breed. The Sioux held him in the highest regard and called him the "Great Medicine Man." He smoked a red pipe with a long stem and often hunted with the Indians. On one occasion after hunting all day unsuccessfully, while smoking around the camp fire, he cried out "Well, we will idle a bear tomorrow" Sure enough the next day's hunt brought in the bear and forever established the Indians' faith in Gen. Sibley. Bottineau brought down twenty head of cattle from the Red River settlement as well as some other merchandise. He sold on his arrival, cows at $50 to $75, oxen at $150 to $200 per pair, butter at fifty cents per pound.

October, 1838, he engaged to guide a small party of men to Red River and remained there until 1840. June 1st, 1840, he crossed the plains once more with a large party consisting of twenty families, and brought his own family along to settle in this country. On this journey he fell in with the old guide Le Compte and a party conveying a Mr. Simpson to Fort Snelling. Mr. Simpson

was a son of Sir George Simpson of England, who had been making an expedition in aid of science and was now on his return, bound for England. Simpson showed signs of insanity at this meeting but the parties diverged, intending to take different routes. On the next day Bottineau was overtaken by two men riding at full speed after him, who requested him to come to the aid of the other party as Mr. Simpson, in a fit of insanity had killed two of the party, one of whom was Le Compte himself. The relief party found that he had added his own death to that of his comrades by blowing out his brains. After disposing as well as could be done of the bodies of the slain, Mr. Bottineau joined the remainder of the party with his own and proceeded, arriving at the Fort in July. Here he found great changes, for the officers of the Fort had driven away Perry and Gervais and others; only a few remained and they were on the point of going, having received notification to that effect from the Fort. Here, for the first time Bottineau met Franklin Steele.

Bottineau went on to Saint Paul with his family and made a claim there in 1840, between Gervais and Clewette, camping on the bluff opposite the site of the old National hotel. The claim ran as follows: Commencing at a point, now the foot of Jackson street, running down the river eighty rods, thence at right angles to the river one mile, embracing a strip eighty rods wide running back to Clewette's claim. Not having money to invest in permanent improvements, he pitched a skin tent (lodge) on the bluff and lived there all summer. During the summer he was employed by Mr. Aiken, an old agent of the American Fur Company, with others to transport freight. In the fan he was able to build a house and make some improvements on his claim. In the spring of 1845 he put twenty acres in crops. From this time he was employed at various things but largely for the American Fur Company, until the spring of 1845. During this time he made one more trip to the Red River. In the summer of 1845 he moved to, the falls of St. Anthony and became identified with the interests of the place until 1854, when he removed to Bottineau Prairie in Maple Grove. During the years 1845 and 1846 he made two more journeys to the Red River settlement.

In 1851, Mr. Bottineau acted as guide to Gov. Ramsey, and the commissioners appointed by the government to negotiate a treaty with the Pembina Indians. The journey was made with a military escort. After holding a council with the Indians at Pembina, and concluding the treaty,

commissioners and Gov. Ramsey expressed a wish to visit Fort Garry, and it was determined to extend the trip accordingly into the British dominion. In 1853 he piloted Gov. Stevens, of Washington Territory on the Northern Pacific railroad exploration, going west to the Rocky Mountains and returning by the Missouri river to St. Louis.

In the fall of 1853, Mr. Bottineau, made a hunting excursion, acting as guide for a party of English lords and bankers. During the winter of 1854-1855, he went with Captain Carney to Mille Lac with a military escort to arrest two Indian murderers. In 1856 he made an expedition with Colonel Smith, to explore the northern country for a suitable point to locate a military post. In 1858, after the report of Colonel Smith's expedition, further exploration was determined on by the general government with reference to the establishment of the post in question. Mr. Bottineau accompanied Colonel White and a captain in the regular army who were charged with the enterprise. This expedition determined the site and located the present Fort Abercrombie at a point then known as Graham's Point. In the winter of 1856 and 1857 he, with others, located the townsite of Breckenridge, and during the following summer he located a town site on his own account at the mouth of Cheyenne river. In 1859, he went with Skinner, the geologist, to locate salt springs for the state. In June, 1860, he accompanied a military expedition to Pembina, and on his return, went with Gov. Ramsey and Judge Bailey to negotiate a treaty with the Pembina and Red Lake bands of Chippewas, but were not su successful in concluding treaty. In 1862, he made a trip with Captain Fisk to Montana, and after reaching Benton, left them to another guide and returned, passing through great dangers from Indians. Since then he has resided on a farm at Red Lake Falls, Polk county.

 

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BOUCHER, Octave was born in Quebec, Canada, in 1842. He lived there until twelve years of age. In 1856 he came to Minnesota with his parents, who took a claim in Plymouth. He enlisted in 1863, in Hatch's Battallion, Company B, Minnesota Volunteers, and went north during the Indian outbreak, stayed three years, and was discharged at Fort Snelling in 1866. He bought the farm, in 1867, where he now lives. The same year he married Delaina Greenwood, by whom he has had five children.

 

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BOUCHER, Peter pastor of St. Anna French Catholic Church at Lenz, was born in the Province of Quebec, July 5tb, 1821. He was educated for the priesthood at the College of Quebec. In 1847 took charge of Sherbrook Church, remaining two years. Then eleven years at Matane, five years at St. Alphonse, and one year at St. Raphael. Thence to Jefferson, D. T., where he remained until 1880, when he took charge of the St. Anna Church.

 

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BOUGHTON, H. H. was born August 25th, 1846, in Lorain county, Ohio, and moved with his parents to Nauvoo, Illinois; from there to Galena, and learned the milling trade; thence to Prescott, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1873, when he went to Minneapolis. He remained there until 1878, engaged in milling. He was then employed at the Crystal Flour Mill, at Shingle Creek, where he has since remained. August 14th, 1872, he married Miss Farnsworth, of River Falls, Wisconsin. They have two children: Etta and Ella.

 

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BOUTELL, M. C. was born at Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1837. At the age of seventeen he was employed by Messrs. Nelson and Rice, of that city, and remained sixteen years. He moved to St. Paul in 1863, and engaged in the hardware business. In 1876, removed to Minneapolis. Mr. Boutell was married to Miss Maria Wellington, of Massachusetts, who bore him three sons and one daughter.

 

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BOWEN, Millard P. attorney and counselor at law, was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, April 19th, 1856. He was educated at Buffalo, New York, and studied law with Bowen & Rogers, of that city.. He was admitted to the bar at Minneapolis, January, 1879, and has been in practice here since. His office is located at 324 Nicollet Avenue.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

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BOWMAN, J. B. was born April 27th, 1830, in New Brunswick. He learned the carpenter's trade, and worked three years in New York city., In 1857 he came here, and for twenty years followed his trade. He worked on the Nicollet House , H. G. Harrison's residence, and others. It was he who cut the brush so a team could pass on First avenue north, from Fourth to Sixth street. Mr. Bowman has only been absent from the town one day since coming here in 1857. He was married in 1869, to Amanda Christmas. They have three children.

 

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BRACKETT, Winn M. originator of the Minneapolis fire department, was born in Maine in 1843. He moved, in 1846, to Nova Scotia, with his parents, where his father was American consul. Six years later he returned to the United States, and at the age of sixteen was identified with the Hose "Annex" of Washington Engine Company, No. 1, of Calais. In 1861, Mr. Brackett enlisted as musician in the Sixth regiment, Maine volunteers, and served until the fall of 1862, when he returned to Calais. Here he was appointed paymaster's clerk, with headquarters at Washington. He came to Minneapolis in 1865, and was engaged as book-keeper for Eastman, Gibson and Company. About this time he organized the Miller's Fire Association, from which has grown the present fire department of Minneapolis. In 1871 he was elected second assistant of the department, and at expiration of the term was chosen chief engineer, and, has held the position since. Mr. Brackett was married at Minneapolis, in 1867, to Miss Emily Hoyt, formerly of Portland Maine. They have four sons: Charles and Winslow Jr., are living; Chapin and Frankie are dead.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

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BRAESCH, Christopher, one of the first settlers on Bass Lake, was born in Prussia, in 1830. His parents died when he was nine years of age, and he was engaged in farming until he came to America, in 1854. After living in Chicago, Illinois, about eighteen months, he came to St. Anthony, Minnesota, where he built a small house. In 1856, he made a claim in Plymouth, where he now lives. Lived on his claim a short time, building a log house, then returned to Minneapolis, where he engaged in season work three years, was employed on the old Eastman and Gibson mill, and others. In 1859, came with his family to his claim in Plymouth, where he has since remained, and now has a pleasant home. He married Sophia Peters, at Chicago, in 1854. They have six children: Emma, Albert, Henry, Mary, Minnie and Charley.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

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BRANDON, J.D. was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, August, 1851, and in 1856 came with his parents to Hennepin county, locating at Maple Plain, where he now resides, on the farm secured by his father. He is engaged in farming, and dealing in lumber and railroad ties. He was married, May 14, 1876, to Belle C. McDonald. Ida M. and Charlie F., are their children. His father, Moses Brandon, died May 14th, 1880. His mother is still living, and a member of his family.

 

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BRANN, T. A. is a native of Maine, born at Gardiner, Kennebec county, March 26th, 1840. He enlisted as a private, April 18th, 1861; he was promoted through the intervening grades to the Rank of First Lieutenant. In 1866, he located at Saint Charles, Minnesota; two years after, he removed to Whitewater, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1877, when he came to Minneapolis. Mr. Brann is the local freight agent of the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railway Company, which position he has held since coming here. He was married in 1866, to Miss M. J. Atkins, of Gardiner, Maine. They are the parents of four children.

 

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BREN, Joseph born in Bohemia, October 19th, 1828. Married September 28th, 1850, to Miss Anna Phillipi, of Bohemia. In 1854, came to America. Lived in Gallatin, Racine county, Wisconsin, one year. Came to Minnetonka and located where he now lives. Has a fine farm. They have eight children: Joseph, Frank, John, William, Josephine, Edward, Benjamin, George.

 

Submitted by Sharon Olbert. jandso@theriver.com

BREN, Joseph S. (b. 1828) in Bohemia. Married Anna ZRUST. On November 10, 1857 Joseph Bren homesteaded 160 acres of land in what is currently Hopkins, Minnesota. His name was misspelled on the land document as PRIEN, but a further document corrected the misspelling. Joseph and Anna BREN had 8 children: Joseph S. (b. 1854), Frank J. (b. 1858), John (b. 1861), William (b. 1863), Josephine (b. 1865), Edward (b. 1870), Benjamin (b. 1872), George (b. 1875). Frank J BREN married Anna KINCL who emigrated from Bohemia in 1877. Frank and Anna also had 8 children. Both Frank and Anna died in 1925 and both are buried at the cemetery at Faith Presbyterian Church in Hopkins.

 

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BREN, Frank was born in Bohemia, March 26th, 1838. Came to America in 1854, and settled in Minnetonka; in 1858, bought the farm on which he now lives, situated two miles from Hopkins Station. Enlisted August 22d, 1864, in company E, Independent Battallion Cavalry. Discharged May 1st, 1866. Married September 26th, 1870, to Josephine Miller. Have eight children, Anna, Frank, Alice, Joseph, Samuel, Daniel, Rosa, and Elizabeth.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

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BRIGGS, E. C. was born at Coventry, Rhode Island, February 20tb, 1838. He came west in 1854, and located at Richfield, Minnesota, where he engaged in farming and carpentering until 1877, when he removed to this city, and was employed as packer in the Minneapolis Mill; he has continued to serve as such ever since. Mr. Briggs was married to Miss V. M. Ray, in September, 1860. Their children are: Ida and George.

 

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BRIGGS, J. H. was born in Smyrna, Chenango county, New York, April 19th, 1828. He came to Minnesota, and located in Maple Grove in 1855. Married Jane A. Faulkner in 1852. They have six children. The first year he came, he had to carry provisions on his back from St. Anthony to his home, a distance of sixteen miles. At that time, Minneapolis had but two houses. Mr. Briggs is one of the oldest settlers in this town

 

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BRIGHAM, Levi born in Canada East, January 18th, 1820. At nine years of age he moved to Burlington, Vermont. Remained there about six years; then went to Worcester, Massachusetts, and lived until 1855, when he came to Minnesota, and took a claim in Hennepin county. This he sold, and bought 140 acres two miles north of Osseo. Married, in 1843, to Miss Mary Cadora, of Massachusetts. They are the parents of four children.

 

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BRIGHAM, William was born in Worcester county, Massachusetts, September 19th, 1835. Early in life he located at Marietta, Ohio, and was in the boot and shoe business there until 1855; thence to LaFayette, Indiana, until 1865; thence to Chicago until 1869, when he came to Minnesota and settled at Saint Peter, still connected with the boot and shoe business. In August 1873, he came to this city, where he was engaged as foreman by the North Star Boot and Shoe Company. Mr. Brigham's family consists of his wife and one daughter.

 

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BRILEY, Samuel was born in Canada, in 1835, and came to Minnesota in 1865, locating in Dodge county, where he remained until 1871, then removed to Minneapolis. In 1876 he removed to this town where he has since resided. He was married, in 1858, to Jane Delahuut, by whom he has had six children, all living, with the exception of one, who died in Minneapolis.

From"1868 - 1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" published by the Maple Plain Garden Club. Submitted by Claudine Pearson. ClaudeP@aol.com

BRILEY, Sam Born in Canada in 1835. In 1858 he was married to Jane Delahunt who was born in the Province of Quebec in 1841.  They settled on their farm at Armstrong in 1876 where 6 children were born to them.  One was Mrs. Frank Lucas of Little Fork, MN and another was Mrs. B. R. Hoisington of Maple Plain.  The home of the Brileys was near Armstrong station.  Sam's brother, Landon and wife lived where the Fred Pagenkopfs now live. Claude Briley was Clauson's son, and grandson of Sam Briley.  Landon was married to Annie Briley who in later years lived in Anoka and passed away there in 1966 at the age of 101, leaving one daughter, Mrs. Gladys Wellman.

 

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BRIMMER, F. H. dentist, was born at Ellsworth, Maine, December 30th, 1844. He received his education in his native place, and there studied dentistry with Doctor Osgood. He graduated from the Philadelphia Dental College Class of 1876-7, with degree of D. D. S. He came to Minneapolis September 30th, 1879. Doctor Brimmer is unmarried.

 

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BROAD, E. is a native of Maine, and was born May 29th, 1814. His father, being a blacksmith, he commenced in early life to learn the trade. In 1842 he moved to Bangor and remained there in pursuit of his trade, until 1865, when he came west and located at Saint Anthony, where he has since been engaged in the manufacture of edged tools. Mr. Broad was married to Miss S. C. Marsh, at Portland, Maine, in 1844.

 

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BROBAUGH, Ole a native of Norway, was born August 20th, 1852. He came to the United, States in 1869 and located in Red Wing, Minnesota, where he was engaged in farming until 1874. He then started a meat market, in which he continued one year, when he came to Minneapolis and opened a meat market with a partner. In January, 1880, Mr. Broliaugh bought his partner's interest and has since continued alone. Mr. Brohaugh was married in 1878, to Albertine Hanson, who bore him one daughter, Clara.

 

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BROOKS, David was born in England, Novernber,1802. He learned the tailoring business, and was converted at twenty-one years of age, and joined the Wesleyan Methodists. Educated in England, and licensed to preach in 1832, and preached in his native country ten years. Came to America in 1842. Settled in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Joined the Rock River conference in 1844. Appointed to Dixon, Illinois, for one year. Fell into the Wisconsin conference in 1845, at its organization, and was stationed one year at Light House Point, and one year at Platteville; also stationed at Dodgeville and Watertown. Came from the Baraboo conference to Minnesota in 1853, by order of Bishop Scott, to take charge of the Minnesota district as presiding elder, embracing all the territory of Minnesota and seventeen thousand squire miles of Wisconsin. Was its presiding elder four years, making appointments and filling them, that reached from the southern line of the state to Lake Superior. Was the presiding elder of Lake Superior district two years, by appointment from the Winona conference; then from the Minneapolis conference to the Minneapolis district, by Bishop Baker, for four years. Appointed to the Monticello circuit for two years and one year agent for the Hamline University; then five years agent for the American Bible Society. Was then sent by Bishop Clark to the Sank Centre district as presiding el- der, for two years. At the end of that time the work in the upper district was reorganized by Bishop Haven, necessitating a change in the, presiding elder in district. From Sauk Centre he went to Brooklyn Centre one year; from there to Champlin and Maple Grove for three years. At the end of that time he again took the agency of the American Bible Society for two years, The first winter he came to Minnesota, he obtained a charter for the Hamline University, and named it. The following season obtained from Bishop Hamline, from whom it takes its name, the munificent sum of twenty-five thousand dollars. Was the first president of the board Of trustees of the institution.

In June, 1855, he left St. Paul, camping out in the open air on his way to Fort Ripley, from there with a guide to assist, put his boat into the Mississippi river, paddling on to Sandy Lake, East Savannah river, St. Louis river. Thence to Superior Bay, carrying his canoe across Portages varying in distance from one mile to ten; when in St. Louis river. Had an encounter with a black bear who wanted to take passage on the boat or give him the bear's hug. This he objected to, and having no weapon but his oar which he used industriously about the bears head and fore paws, spattering water in his face until he was glad to beat a retreat, shaking the water from his shaggy eye brows, so that he could see which way to make his escape. Landed in Superior at the head of the lake, and preached the first Protestant sermon ever heard there, also obtained a site and lot for a church. Married Miss Ann Moseley, who died of cholera in 1850; married again in 1852 to Margaret W. Prior. They have had five children, Jabez, Josia, Emma , Adin, and Amy A.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co

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BROOKS, Jabez, D. D. Professor of the Greek Language and Literature at the University of Minnesota, was born in England. When a youth his parents emigrated to America and settled in Wisconsin in 1842, at Southport, now Kenosha. At this point he pursued his studies at Southport Academy. After finishing his preparatory studies in the West he entered the sophomore class in Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut, in 1847, and graduated in 1850. He maintained himself while pursuing his studies by teaching and performing whatever labor he could get. After graduating he came to Wisconsin and conducted until 1851 a seminary at Watertown, Wisconsin. He next occupied the chair of Greek and Mathematics in Lawrence University at Appleton, Wisconsin. In 1854, he was elected principal of the preparatory department of Hamline University at Red Wing, and entered upon his duties on 16th of November, and during 1854-5 he was pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at that place. In 1857-8, ill-health compelled him to retire from teaching. In 1861 he was elected president of Hamline University, which position he retained until 1869, when he resigned, and the same year was elected professor of Greek at the University. Since 1869 he has continuously held that position, and for several years after, the decease of Professor Walker in 1876, had charge of the department of Latin also. During his presidency of Hamline University, Professor Brooks was a member of the State Normal school board, the Agricultural College board, the general conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, and commissioner of Indian payments. Mr. Brooks was married in 1854 to Miss Ruby B. Pearce, of Watertown, Wisconsin, and has had five children: The eldest, Adin P., died February 2d, 1881, D. Denslow, Olive E., now Mrs. E. T. Sykes, Anna E. and Lucia May.

 

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BROOKS, William was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, December 6th, 1826. He remained with his parents twenty years. Lived in Wisconsin eight years, and came to Minnesota in 1857, locating in Maple Grove, where he now lives. In 1852 he married Mary A. Carter, who died in December, 1861. His second wife was Sarah L. Jenneson. The first eight years that he was here, he lived in a log house that was covered with red oak shakes, and had a floor of split basswood.

 

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BROOKINS, G. W. a native of Vermont, was born December 12th, 1827. He remained there until 1856, farming summers and teaching winters. He came to Minnesota in 1856 and settled in Wright county, engaging in farming and engineering. Enlisted in the Third Minnesota Infantry, mustered out in 1864, and served in the commissary department one year. In 1865 he came to Crystal Lake, remaining here until 1872, when he went to Minneapolis in the lumber business, and from that to the well and pump business. In 1880 he again moved to Crystal Lake on his own land in section two. Married in 1867, Miss Zilpha A. Atwood, of Vermont, They have three children: Anna, Clara and Freddie.

 

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BROSSEAU, Mrs. Margaret was born at Leech Lake, Minnesota, October 15th, 1826, and is the daughter of Peter and Louisa Quinn. Her whole life has been passed in the vicinity of Fort Snelling. Her early life was spent among the Indians and traders who frequented the fort. She, by this association, became familiar with the Sioux, Chippewa and French languages in addition to English. She attended school at the fort and at Mr. Pond's missionary school. In 1846 she was married to S. J. Findley, of Prairie du Chien, a clerk in the Sutler's store at Fort Snelling. Mr. Findley kept the ferry and lived in a house, still standing, on the east bank of the Mississippi River, near the new bridge at the fort. There he died November 8th, 1855, leaving his wife and three children. Two of these children are now dead, and the third, the only survivor, is Mrs. A. E. Scofield of this town. Mrs. Findley remained at Fort Snelling until 1857 when she, married F. X. Brosseau and settled on her farm in Bloomington where she now resides. From 1862 - 1872 they lived in St. Paul, but returned at the latter date and have since lived in their old home. There were two children by the last marriage, James L. and Francis X.; both are dead.

 

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BROUILLETTE, J. B. was born in Canada, in 1824. He was a dry goods merchant in his native place three years, then moved to New Orleans, where he was engaged in the Saint Charles hotel five years; thence to California, where he was in the hotel business five years; thence to Australia, remaining there two years. He also spent several years in Washington Territory, Oregon and the British Possessions, engaged in farming and mining. He came to Minneapolis in 1879, where he has since remained. Mr. Brouillette was married to Miss Jane Renwick. Their living children are Mary, Joseph, James, Louise, and Victor.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 520

BROWN, Baldwin was born in Rochester, New York, February 7th, 1838. He came to St. Anthony in 1849, in company with his parents. His first enterprise was freighting from St. Paul and St. Anthony to the different government posts. He dealt in horses, cattle and real estate for several years, and in 1862, built the old "St. Cloud Hotel.'' He was engaged in different pursuits until 1870, when he opened a livery and sale stable. Mr. Brown was member of city council from 1872 to 1877, member of legislature 1878 and was elected member of board of county commissioners Hennepin county, fall of 1880. He married Emma Day in 1865. Their children are: Charles, William, Baldwin and Frederick.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 520

BROWN, Benjamin J. was born in Maine, April 4th, 1821. A few years in early life were devoted to lumbering, and at twenty-six yean of age engaged in traveling business, in which he remained about six years, and in 1852 came to St. Anthony. Here he commenced the lumbering business, in which he was successful until the great financial crash of 1857. He is now employed as overseer in lumbering camps. . Mr. Brown was the first marshal of St. Anthony. He was also interested with Anson Northrup in the civilization of murderous Indians, by the hemp method, in 1857. He was married to Nellie Carleton, April 8th, 1855. They have ten children living, two of whom, Ben Bruce and Nellie, were born at Crow Wing, being the first white children born in that region, and Mrs. Brown the second white woman who lived in that locality.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 521

BROWN, C. D. was born in Maine, in 1835. At eighteen years of age he learned the trade of wagon-maker, and has continued in that business since, except three years spent at sea. He came to St. Anthony in 1857, and in the fall of 1859 established opposite the Pillsbury "A" mill. Mr. Brown enlisted, in 1862, in the First Minnesota battery, and was discharged at the end of one year on account of failing health. After returning, he opened a shop near the present location, which was burned in 1869; soon after he located at his present shop, 417 Main street, S. E. Mr. Brown was married, in 1859, to Henrietta Murphy who has borne him four children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 521

BROWN, F. D. was born at Vienna, Maine, May, 1847. He came to Minneapolis with his parents in 1854. He learned the trade of blacksmith of his brother, when he was so small he was obliged to stand on a block to strike the anvil. "Brown Brothers" were the first fires started in the C. M. & St. P. R. R. shops. Mr. Brown was married, in 1870, to Miss E. S. Lindstrom. They have two children, May and Nellie. Levi Brown, his father, started the first blacksmith shop on the west side, and died in 1857.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 235

BROWN, James A is a native of Cavan county, Ireland, where he was born, July 8, 1849. His father , who was a farmer, kept him at school until sixteen years of age. In the fall of 1866 the family came to America, locating near Galena, Illinois, and the following year, removed to Eden Prairie. In 1875, bought the farm he now lives on, five miles east of Shakopee, on the north bank of the Minnesota river. Married Miss Mary A. Dean, March 21, 1877; have two children, Edward J. and William R. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the Presbyterian church and take a lively interest in educational matters.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 521

BROWN, J. H. is a native of Canada, and was born September 16th, 1856. He married Elizabeth Gipson, June 2d, 1879. They have one daughter. His early life was spent in the hotel business. During the summer of 1880, he moved to Minneapolis, and now has a sample room, 527 Washington Avenue south.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 228

BROWN, John was born in England, September 21, 1838; came to America in 1847. His father enlisted in the 3d Inft. of U. S. Regs., and went to Mexico, his family accompanying him. In 1849, the regiment was ordered to Fort Snelling, where Mr. Brown remained until 1853, when they settled on a farm in this town. John, in 1863, enlisted in Company D, 1st Minnesota Regiment; was in the first Bull Run battle; mustered out in 1864. The same summer he was sent as a scout to Dakota. Part of 1865 in the Quartermaster's department in Virginia. In the fall of 1865, married Anna M. Ames, of Bloomington, and settled on his present farm. They have three children, John A., Cora N., and Walter J. Mr. Brown has a good farm valued at $5,000.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 521

BROWN, J. M. was born at Winthrop, Maine, August 19th, 1839. He came to this city in 1869, where he engaged in lumbering three years, then bought a shingle mill at Belknap, on the Saint Paul and Duluth Railroad. He had this mill in operation four years, then returned to Minneapolis. Since 1878, he has been engineer in the North Star Planing Mill. Mr. Brown married Ada Dean, December 25th, 1867.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 347

BROWN, M.D was born in 1849, at Elmira, New York. In 1856 he came to Minneapolis, and has since resided here, with the exception of one year, passed at school in the East. Mr. Brown is engaged in farming on section 12, where he owns eighty acres of land, and boards horses summer, and winter.

 


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