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History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 324

ABEL, Henry was born in Essex county, Now York, May 8th, 1924. He lived there twenty-three years, and in Hillsdale, Michigan, four years. Married Ann E. Lobdell, in 1850; she died in 1852. He came to Minnesota in April, 1854, and took a claim in Maple Grove, where the town house now stands. He did the first mason work this side of St. Anthony. He made a claim and sold it; then, made another; sold that, and took the one he now lives on; built a log house ten feet square and covered it with bark, using the same material for floor and tables. In 1858, he was married to Sarah M. Brown, who died in 1861. He married his third wife, Sarah Weaver, in 1862. Mr. Abel built a new house, which, with contents, was destroyed by fire in 1870. He is the father of four children. His third wife died in October, 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 502

ABEL, Herman was born in Germany in 1825. Learned the dyeing and scouring business in his native country, and followed it for thirty-one years in Germany and the United States. He has been engaged in Minneapolis since 1878, and is at present, located at No. 304 Hennepin Avenue. Married Rosina Flad, June, 1861. They have two children, Anna C. and George J.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 346

ADAMS, William a native of Scotland, was born in 1835. He came to America in 1869, and located in Minneapolis; he lived on Washington avenue South until his present residence was, built in 1875. Mr. Adams has been engaged in the carpenter's trade since a boy. His wife was Miss Ellen Walker; they were. married in 1864. Six children have been born to them.

Additional information: Obituary - submitted by Linda J. Carroll, descendant. Can be reached at Morab2@aol

Minneapolis Tribune or Star- March 1921.

"
Last Rites Tomorrow for William Adams, Survivor of Lucknow"
The funeral of William Adams, 3201 Minnehaha Avenue, Minneapolis, pioneer believed to have been the last survivor of British forces at the siege of Lucknow, will be held at the residence, at 2 p.m. tomorrow. Interment will bein Lakewood cemetery. Mr. Adams was born in Scotland, December 2, 1835. He served in the English Army, as a member of the Bengal Fusiliers, and was stationed in India at the outbreak of the Indian mutiny in 1857. His regiment was part of a force of 3,000 which defended Delhi, one of the first posts to be attacked. Later his organization was transferred to Lucknow where the British defense became historic. The garrison of 1,700 made up of 700 natives and 150 civilians and the British regiment, withstood attacks for three months, guarding 1,500 noncombatants. Women, children and soldiers were crowded into entrenchments covering 60 acres, detached houses being knit together by ditches and stockades. Only 982 of the British soldiers were alive when the garrison was relieved, and nearly all were sick or wounded. Mr. Adams was wounded in the fighting during the last days of the siege. He was awarded the Victoria medal for bravery in action. In 1864 Mr. Adams married Miss Helen Walker, and came to America in 1869, settling in Minneapolis. He was a contractor many years, but has retired. He is survived by five sons, William Jr., Alexander, Charles, George and James, all of Minneapolis, and three daughters, Mrs. A. McCullum and Mrs H. Wood of Minneapolis and Mrs. E. Bloomer of Sherburne, Minn. Buried March 7, 1921 at Lakewood Cemetery, Minneapolis, Minn.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 346

ADAMS, A.S. was born July 9th, 1848, at Townsend, Middlesex county, Massachusetts. He was raised as a farmer, and lived in his native town until 1867, when he came to Minnesota with his father, and located in Minneapolis township, where he has since resided, owning a farm of thirty-three acres. He was elected justice of the peace in March, 1880. Mr. Adams married Carrie Moffett, April, 1871.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 319

ADCOCK, Robert a native of Norfolk, England, was born in 1827. He emigrated to America in 1849, and lived in Boston, Massachusetts, six years; he moved to Minnesota in 1855, made one of the first claims in Corcoran, and is now the oldest living settler in the town. In 1855 he was married to Margaret Burk. They have six children: Thomas F., Mary E., George W., John, Ruth M. and James.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 347

AITKEN, R. M. was born in 1845, at Dunham, Canada East. He lived in his native town until eighteen years of age, when he went to Vermont and worked eight years in the car shops at Saint Albans, then removed to Mississippi and worked for a railroad company. In 1873 he went to Wisconsin, and in 1877, came to Minneapolis, in November of that year he married Lillian M. Shorey. Mr. Aitkin is proprietor of the Cedar Avenue Dairy, which he started in 1877 with only four cows, but has gradually increased the number to supply a growing trade, until now he has thirty-five.

 

AKERSON, George Edward - Late in the year 2000, while searching Westminister's Archives, senior pastor Timothy Hart-Anderson found a dusty old scrapbook titled "Book of Remembrances, Class No. 1. Compiled by ten boys ages 10-12, and inspired by their teacher Andrew Benton, the book is filled with photos, information about the boys, inspiring quotes from notable regional and national figures, and messages to future students. Click on the link below to explore the Book of Remembrance and read the legacy left by ten boys, including George Edward Akerson..
http://www.ewestminster.org/classof01/biographies

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 502

ALDEN, A. M. was born in Cortland county, New York, October 24th, 1838. At the age of twelve, moved with parents to McHenry county, Illinois. In 1855, came to Minnesota and settled in Fillmore county, and engaged in farming there and in Dodge county until 1863. Thence to Olmsted county, engaged in the dry goods business until 1866, then to Fillmore county again, engaging in a general merchandise business until 1872, when he moved to Minneapolis and engaged in the grocery and crockery trade until 1880, when he retired for the purpose of looking after his property. Married in 1860, to Maria Shedd, of New Hampshire. They have live children, Elizabeth E., Wm. A., Jennie M., Bertha F., Edwin M. His wife died in 1871. Married for second wife, Mrs. H. E. Pardee, of Elgin, Illinois. They have had four children, two now living; Lyman S. and Harriet M.

 

From "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voyageur Press. 1890


(Click to enlarge)

ALDRICH, Cyrus, To the old residents of Minneapolis the name of Cyrus Aldrich is familiar and the personality it recalls is held in high regard. Mr. Aldrich came to Minneapolis in 1855. He was prominent in politics before and after his coming here. He served two terms in the national House of Representatives with marked ability. He was active in the establishment of the Northern Pacific Railway. He was a member of the State Legislature in 1865, and became postmaster of Minneapolis in 1867, continuing in office four years. He was in the service of the public almost continuously, and retained the confidence and esteem of the community to a remarkable degree. He died in 1871. (ALSO SEE BELOW)

As listed in the Proceedings and Report of the Annual Meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - May 11, 1899 and 1900.

ALDRICH, Cyrus was born in Smithfield, R. I., June 8th, 1808. His father, Dexter Aldrich, was a banker. His mother was a Miss White, descended from Thomas White, who came with the puritans from England in 163o. He worked on his father's farm until seventeen, when he took a sea voyage, and was wrecked on the of St. Thomas, W.I. In 1837 he came west, and the next year took a contract on the Illinois and Michigan canal, which terminated disastrously for him as well as for the state. In 1842 he became a member of the firm of Aldrich, Galbraith, Porter & Co., with headquarters in Galena, Ill., largely engaged in the stage business and mail contracts. In May, 1845, he was married to Clara Adelia Heaton of Indiana. The previous year he was elected to the state legislature. While a member of the legislature the old indebtedness of the state was settled; the good common sense and clear head for business and public measures of Mr. Aldrich had great influence in straightening the knotty question. He was proud of having a voice in the settlement of that dispute, as were his constituents. C. L. Wilson, in the Chicago Journal, said, "Every one of Mr. Aldrich's constituents should take him by the hand and say, 'Well done, thou good and faithful servant.' In 1847 he was elected registrar of deeds of Jo Davis county. In the spring of 1849, President Taylor appointed him receiver of public moneys in the United States land office at Dixon, ILL., where he moved and resided until sota in 1856. In 1854 he was elected chairman of the board of supervisors of Dixon and a member of the board of commissioners of Lee county. In 1852 he received the Whig nomination for congress in his district, having the well-known "Long John" Wentworth for an opponent. Although the district was hopelessly Democratic, he worked so zealously that he ran 1570 votes ahead of his party, and always said if he had had the sinews of war that "Long John" had, and not so heavy a load as General Scott to carry, he should have won the day.

He settled in Minneapolis in 1856, where he lost none of his popularity. In the spring of 1857 he was nominated to the constitutional convention and elected by a larger majority than any other candidate. A few days after the conclusion of the convention he was nominated by the Republicans as one of the three congressmen, but his party was unsuccessful. He became so widely known, however, during the canvass that at the next election for congress in 1858 he was elected by over 4,000 majority, and was re-elected in 1860 by over 10,500 majority.

When the First Minnesota Regiment of immortal fame was called into the field, he became its devoted friend. His unceasing generosity and labor shortened his life, impoverished his fortune and caused him to sacrifice some of his valuable property. President Lincoln, a warm personal friend, appointed him one of the three members of the Sioux Indemnity Commission in 1863. He was one of the incorporators of the Northern Pacific Railway, and did good service in its cause. In 1864 he was elected to the state legislature. He was appointed postmaster of Minneapolis in 1867, filling the position to the satisfaction of all.

The kindly deeds which will keep him fresh in the minds of his friends are those which he performed in the aid of our soldiers in the War of the Rebellion. He lied at his home in Minneapolis, Oct. 5, 1871, at the age of 63.

 

As listed in the Proceedings and Report of the Annual Meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - May 11, 1899 and 1900.

ALDRICH, Clara Adelia Heaton, widow of Cyrus Aldrich, was born at Silver Creek, N. Y., March 15, 1829 removing with her father's family to Laporte, Ind., in 1837. Her father, Cyrus Heaton, built the first sawmill at Silver Creek. Her mother, Betsey Spaulding Heaton, was a descendant of Edward Spaulding, who came from England in 1630 and held office in the colonies. Her grandfather Heaton served in the Revolutionary War under Stark, and died of wounds received in battle.

Mrs. Aldrich came to Minneapolis with her husband in 1856, and resides at the old homestead, corner Ninth street and First avenue south, at the present time.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 502

ALLAN, James M. was born in Montreal, Canada, February 11th, 1843. In 1857, moved with his parents to Upper Canada. In 1860 moved, and lived at Fort Atkinson, Iowa, one year, then to Decorah and learned the blacksmith trade. Enlisted, in 1863, in the Forty-sixth Iowa Infantry, and went to Tennessee, and was discharged at Davenport, September 23d, 1863. In 1872 went to Montana and, engaged in mining' and prospecting. Moved the same year to Minneapolis and worked six years for R. B. Langdon & Company. Was appointed on the police force in March 1879, which position he has since held. Married November 14th, 1865, to Mary E. Meadow. They have had three children; one now living, Leon L.

 

ALLEN, Edgar Marian, Late in the year 2000, while searching Westminister's Archives, senior pastor Timothy Hart-Anderson found a dusty old scrapbook titled "Book of Remembrances, Class No. 1. Compiled by ten boys ages 10-12, and inspired by their teacher Andrew Benton, the book is filled with photos, information about the boys, inspiring quotes from notable regional and national figures, and messages to future students. Click on the link below to explore the Book of Remembrance and read the legacy left by ten boys, including Edgar Marian Allen.
http://www.ewestminster.org/classof01/biographies

 

Submitted by Karolyn Roberts, great-great grandniece. Karolyn Roberts

ALLEN, Olsson Gustaf (Gust) b1/30/1856 Korsbyn,Järnskog,,Varmland, Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) Christening: Gustaf Olofsson 2/1/1856 Järnskog,,Varmland,Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) d12/18/1935 Minneapolis,Hennepin,MN (Death Certificate) Burial: Gust Allen, Allen-Olson Family Plot, Hillside Cem.,Mnapls,Hennepin,MN (Hillside Cemetery Records) - Moved 2-22-1884 from Söpple,Järnskog,(S) to Amerika . Snickerifabriksägare in Minneapolis, MN - Address: 2542 Taylor St.,Minneapolis, MN - m 1Brita (Emma) Jonasdotter (Daughter of Jonas Jonsson & Brita Persdotter) b9-4-1857 Malung,Kopparberg,Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) - Christening: 9/7/1857 Malung,Kopparberg,Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) Burial: Emma Allen, 1899 at 38 years of age, Allen-Olson Family Plot, Hillside Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN (Hillside Cemetery Records)- Lived in Malung,(W). Lived in Söpple, Järnskog,(S). Moved 4-18-1884 from Söpple,Järnskog to Amerika - (Söpple,Ägare 1882) Used name of Allen in America instead of using Olson as Hulda & Abel used Olson. - Gustaf was a carpenter in Sweden and continued his profession in Minneapolis. (Söpple,p175) Address for Gustaf was 2542 Taylor Street, Minneapolis, MN - He visited relatives in WI one time, went to see his nieces & nephews, children of his sister Hulda Olson Swanson (Rena Johnson McAuly, 2/2/2002) - m 2Ingeborg Olsson? babt1882 - Burial: 9/13/1973; 91 years old; Allen-Olson Family Plot, Hillside Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN (Hillside Cemetery Records) (Informant on death certificate for Gust) - (1900 Fed Census, Dist. 104, Ward 9, p243, Sheet 18,Line 21, Gustaf Allen at 2542 Taylor, can't read the occupation, no wife listed at this time [for lookup use Gustav Allen], however, on Sheet 14, Line 10 is the same address listed with a Mr. & Mrs. Leonard, with a note to see sheet 18, Line 21 [must have changed hands at that point]) 1902 Minneapolis City Directory at the above address.(1910 U.S. 13th Census, Dist. 171, 9th Ward, Sheet 8 [Image 15] Gustaf working for the Pyaisel? Furniture Store, married to Ingeborg for 8 years, 54 years old, Ingebor is 28 years old and her first marriage, was born in Sweden, living at 2542 Taylor while brother to Gustaf, Charles C. Olson, lived at 2538 Taylor) The 1914, 1921, & 1929 telephone books of Minneapolis lists Gustaf as a finisher and that he worked at the firm A. J. Carlberg. Later he became a cabinetmaker in the same company and in 1929 a patternmaker at the firm of Herman Berg. (Söpple, p178) In the 1916 Minneapolis City Directory, Gustaf is still at the same address and is listed as a Cabinetmaker. - January 5, 1920 Census of MN, Gustaf is living with his wife, Ingeborg, age 36, & 2 daughters, Vera S. Allen, age 16; & Anna V. Allen, age 15; & his mother-in-law, Caroline Olsson, age 76. Ingeborg & Caroline were born in Sweden with Swedish parents. Gustaf became a U.S. citizen in 1894. Ingeborg immigrated in 1900 & Caroline in 1902. Gustaf was a wood finisher in an Antique shope. Still living at 2542 Taylor St. in Minneapolis. - Gustaf wrote a letter to Sweden in 1926 saying his daughter Anna is engaged and will move to Chicago in the spring of 1927. And on 10/10/1929 Gustaf wrote saying he is now lonely since Carl has left. He reports that Carl's children are all well and none of them are married yet. His own son, David, has moved to Los Angeles, and David's sister, Vera, has visited him. (May Dahlbeck: L's written to Sweden) In the 1930 U.S. MN Census, Hennepin County, District 181, Listed as Gust Allen. Gustaf & Ingeborg are still living at the same address, Gustaf is 74 & Ingeborg is 47. and so are their daughters Vera & Ann. Apparently, Anna did not marry as planned. Vera is now 27 years old and working as a stenographer in an office. Ann is 25 years old and working as a bookkeeper for a roofing company. Burial: Hillside Cemetery, Minneapolis, MN

 

Submitted by Karolyn Roberts, great-great grandniece. Karolyn Roberts

ALLEN, Olsson Gustaf (Gust) b1/30/1856 Korsbyn,Järnskog,,Varmland, Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) Christening: Gustaf Olofsson 2/1/1856 Järnskog,,Varmland,Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) d12/18/1935 Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN (Death Certificate) Burial: Gust Allen, Allen-Olson Family Plot, Hillside Cem.,Mnapls,Hennepin,MN (Hillside Cemetery Records) - Moved 2-22-1884 from Söpple,Järnskog,(S) to Amerika . Snickerifabriksägare in Minneapolis, MN - Address: 2542 Taylor St.,Minneapolis, MN - m 1Brita (Emma) Jonasdotter (Daughter of Jonas Jonsson & Brita Persdotter) b9-4-1857 Malung,Kopparberg,Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) - Christening: 9/7/1857 Malung,Kopparberg,Sweden (Vital Records of Sweden) Burial: Emma Allen, 1899 at 38 years of age, Allen-Olson Family Plot, Hillside Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN (Hillside Cemetery Records)- Lived in Malung,(W). Lived in Söpple,Järnskog,(S). Moved 4-18-1884 from Söpple,Järnskog to Amerika - (Söpple,Ägare 1882) Used name of Allen in America instead of using Olson as Hulda & Abel used Olson. - Gustaf was a carpenter in Sweden and continued his profession in Minneapolis. (Söpple,p175) Address for Gustaf was 2542 Taylor Street, Minneapolis, MN - He visited relatives in WI one time, went to see his nieces & nephews, children of his sister Hulda Olson Swanson (Rena Johnson McAuly, 2/2/2002) - m 2Ingeborg Olsson? babt1882 - Burial: 9/13/1973; 91 years old; Allen-Olson Family Plot, Hillside Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin, MN (Hillside Cemetery Records) (Informant on death certificate for Gust) - (1900 Fed Census, Dist. 104, Ward 9, p243, Sheet 18,Line 21, Gustaf Allen at 2542 Taylor, can't read the occupation, no wife listed at this time [for lookup use Gustav Allen], however, on Sheet 14, Line 10 is the same address listed with a Mr. & Mrs. Leonard, with a note to see sheet 18, Line 21 [must have changed hands at that point]) 1902 Minneapolis City Directory at the above address.(1910 U.S. 13th Census, Dist. 171, 9th Ward, Sheet 8 [Image 15] Gustaf working for the Pyaisel? Furniture Store, married to Ingeborg for 8 years, 54 years old, Ingebor is 28 years old and her first marriage, was born in Sweden, living at 2542 Taylor while brother to Gustaf, Charles C. Olson, lived at 2538 Taylor) The 1914, 1921, & 1929 telephone books of Minneapolis lists Gustaf as a finisher and that he worked at the firm A. J. Carlberg. Later he became a cabinetmaker in the same company and in 1929 a patternmaker at the firm of Herman Berg. (Söpple, p178) In the 1916 Minneapolis City Directory, Gustaf is still at the same address and is listed as a Cabinetmaker. - January 5, 1920 Census of MN, Gustaf is living with his wife, Ingeborg, age 36, & 2 daughters, Vera S. Allen, age 16; & Anna V. Allen, age 15; & his mother-in-law, Caroline Olsson, age 76. Ingeborg & Caroline were born in Sweden with Swedish parents. Gustaf became a U.S. citizen in 1894. Ingeborg immigrated in 1900 & Caroline in 1902. Gustaf was a wood finisher in an Antique shope. Still living at 2542 Taylor St. in Minneapolis. - Gustaf wrote a letter to Sweden in 1926 saying his daughter Anna is engaged and will move to Chicago in the spring of 1927. And on 10/10/1929 Gustaf wrote saying he is now lonely since Carl has left. He reports that Carl's children are all well and none of them are married yet. His own son, David, has moved to Los Angeles, and David's sister, Vera, has visited him. (May Dahlbeck: L's written to Sweden) In the 1930 U.S. MN Census, Hennepin County, District 181, Listed as Gust Allen. Gustaf & Ingeborg are still living at the same address, Gustaf is 74 & Ingeborg is 47. and so are their daughters Vera & Ann. Apparently, Anna did not marry as planned. Vera is now 27 years old and working as a stenographer in an office. Ann is 25 years old and working as a bookkeeper for a roofing company. Burial: Hillside Cemetery, Minneapolis, MN

  • David Emanuel Allen b1-23-1883 Söpple,Järnskog,Varmland,Sweden. Moved 4-18-1884 from Söpple,Järnskog to Amerika. Antecknades som odöpt i kyrkoböckerna - Lived in Minneapolis, MN - Ett foto med ettÅrige David sittande i föräldrarnas knä finns i Söppleboken. Ett amerikabrev från tioårige David finns i Såppleboken. News agent via Soo Line 1921. (Söpple, p178) - 1900 Fed Census, Dist. 104, Ward 9, p243, David E. listed at same address as father, and occupation was Clerk [probably at the business of his father] - David E. Allen, listed in the 1902 Minneapolis City Directory as living at 2542 Taylor, Minneapolis, (Home of his parents) and is an Elevator Operator; 1916 Directory, he is not listed) In 1921 he is still at his father's address and working as a News Agent for the Soo Railroad Line. (Söpple,p178) He moved to Los Angeles shortly after this and he was known to be working at a railroad depot there as of 1929.

  •  Alice G. Allen b1/1897 MN (adopted) Parents both were born in Norway (1900 Fed Census, Dist. 104, Ward 9, p243 under Gustaf Allen) (Not listed in 1910 Census)

  • Elvera (1910 Census) (Vera) S. Allen b2/8/1903 MN (Mother's Maiden Name: Olson (Death Cert. of Vera S. Owens #19757-MN-021309; 1910 Census) (Söpple) - d8/6/1975 ,Hennepin, MN (Death Cert. #19757-MN-021309) - m? Owens (Death Obit of Gust Allen) - 1910 Census: Elvera is 7 years old. 1920 Census, Vera is age 16, and living at home with her parents. Vera is working as a bookkeeper in a furniture store, possibly the same as her father.  Also, was known to write hymns and poetry for the Swedish-American Church.
  • Anna V. Allen b MN  - 1910 Census is age 5. 1920 Census, Anna is 15 years old and living at home with her parents. Was a writer too.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 502

ALLEN, Z. O. born in Washington county, Maine, June 7th, 1859. Came to Minneapolis, in July, 1878, engaging in several different branches of business until August, 1880, when he bought an interest in the meat market located at 717 Washington Avenue south; firm name, Barber and Company.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 347

ALLISON, A. B. a native of Delaware county, New York, was born in 1840. He was engaged in farming until 1866, when he came to Hennepin county, and for four years worked in the woods; he then started in the dairy business; was in partnership with Mr. Collins but since 1875 Mr. Allison has conducted the business alone at his place on section 20, and has twenty-five cows. He was married May 6th, 1880, to Mrs. Broderick, of Maine.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 502

ALLWORTH, J. C. Proprietor of the Allworth House, located at 118 Second street south. It is a two-story building with thirteen rooms, with the office, bar, dining-room and kitchen on the first floor, and the parlor on the second floor.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 502

AMES, Albert Alonzo was born at Garden Prairie, Boone county, Illinois, January 18th, 1842. At ten years of age he moved with his parents to Minneapolis, graduated from the high school at sixteen, and at once commenced the study of medicine with his father. Graduated at the Rush Medical College, of Chicago, February 5th, 1862. Married, April 21st, 1862, to Miss Sarah, daughter of Capt. Richard Strout, of Minneapolis. In August 1862, Dr. Ames, in company with others, raised Company B of 9th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and engaged in the service on the frontier, participating in all the battles of his regiment against the Indians. In the fall of 1863, accompanied his regiment south, and was in active service until the close of the war. His experience in surgery, gained during his time of service, was of great value to him. In July 1864, he was commissioned surgeon, and served in that capacity until mustered out, August 18th, 1865. Returned to Minneapolis, and engaged in the practice of his profession with his father. In November, 1866, he was elected to the state legislature from Hennepin county. In 1868, went to California, and engaged in the newspaper business until 1874, when he returned to Minneapolis, where he has since remained. After the death of his father, in September, 1874, he took his practice, and has continued it since. Has held, several offices of prominence, and was elected mayor of Minneapolis in 1876. Is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Odd Follows, Druids, and Knights of Pythias. Has three children living: Charlie C., Effie F., and Frankie E.

 

From "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", collected and Compiled by Edward A. Bromely, Voygeuer Press. 1890.


(click for large image)

AMES, Dr. Alfred Elisha (Same as Alfred Elisha Ames below) It is sixteen years since Dr. Alfred Elisha Ames died, but every citizen of Minneapolis chose residence dates as far back as that, has a distant pleasant recollection of that worthy pioneer. It was in 1851 that Dr. Ames came to St Anthony, located a claim, and built a shanty on the present site of Minneapolis. He was a very thorough student and successful practitioner of his profession, but matters of public interest were not neglected. In 1852 he was elected to the Territorial Legislature, and in 1854 was chosen Judge of Probate. He drew the bill for incorporating the village of Minneapolis, in 1856, and was appointed postmaster. In 1857 Dr. Ames was a member of the constitutional convention, and in 1860 was one of the State normal school board. He was prominent in public enterprises of all kinds, was a leader in the medical fraternity, and an active assistant, especially in educational movements. He was also prominent in the Masonic order.

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing.

Page 500

AMES, Alfred Elisha a representative of the pioneer settlers of Minnesota none are more deserving of a bright record, than Alfred Elisha Ames, whose life was a great success. He was a native of Colellester, Vermont, where he was born December 13th, 1814. He attended the common schools a few months of each year, working on a farm the balance of the time, until he was seventeen years of age. Under the influence of his honest, industrious parents, his mind was fitted to look beyond his immediate surroundings, and win his way to an honored and useful career. In 1832 he went to Painesville, Ohio, where he attended school during the winter, working for his board with a doctor. He became interested in medicine, reading when opportunity was afforded. He engaged in farming and brick making for some time, and in 1836 he, with his newly wedded wife emigrated to Boone county, Illinois, where his father, with family had preceded him. In 1837 his father died, and all depended upon his exertions for the support of his wife, also his widowed mother and her family. In November 1838, taking a pack on his back, he started by way of an Indian trail to Vandalia, then the seat of government. Through the kind efforts of Hon. Stephen A. Douglass, he obtained employment as deputy of the secretary of state and private secretary to Gov. Carlin. In 1840 Mr. Ames attended medical lectures at Rush Medical College, Chicago, under Professor Daniel Brainerd; he afterward worked on his farm reading medicine nights; later with Dr. R. S. Maloney, of Belvidere, where he also began to practice. In 1842 he was elected to the state legislature from the counties of Boone, McHenry, Kane, De Kalb and Grundy. After the adjournment of the legislature, he went to Chicago and attended a course of medical lectures, studying with Professor Brainerd. He attended another course of lectures at Chicago, and graduated from Rush Medical college in February, 1845. In 1847 he made a professional visit to New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Cincinnati, and St. Louis, visiting all the hospitals and deriving much benefit from the tour. He was elected to the state senate of Illinois in 1849. At Springfield, Governor French commissioned him paymaster-general of his staff and the next year, owing to his faithful devotion, he was re-elected to the senate. In October 1851, he came to Saint Anthony in quest of a new home, and in November located a claim and built a shanty on the present site of Minneapolis. Forming a partnership with Dr. J. H. Murphy, he began the practice of medicine at Saint Anthony. He was elected to the territorial legislature from Hennepin county in 1852 and in October, 1854, he was chosen probate judge. In 1856 Dr. Ames drew the bill for incorporating the village of Minneapolis, and was appointed its postmaster. On June 1st, 1857, he was elected a member of the constitutional convention, in which body he was chairman of the committee on school lands and university, and in 1860 was a member of the state normal school board. In 1862 he visited the hospitals in the principal eastern cities, and returning home resumed his practice. In 1868 he went east to visit his native place and May 1st he embarked at New York city for California, being absent several months. After his return he continued to reside and practice in this city until his death. He served in many public capacities; was a member and usually a leader in all medical societies, also actively interested in all matters pertaining to educational advantages. During the summer of 1874 his health began to fail him and in September he passed peacefully to his rest. His funeral, which took place the Sunday following, was conducted by Dr. McMasters of St. Paul, attended by nearly all the Masonic bodies in the state. Dr. Ames was an enthusiastic worker in the cause of masonry. Many lodges were organized and instructed by him; he was the first grand Master and organized the first grand lodge in the state. He was a member of the Episcopal church. His marriage with Martha A. Pratt, occurred at Geneva, Ohio, in 1836. By this union they had seven sons, five of whom with their mother, survive him.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 501

AMES, Eli B. was born in Colchester, Vermont, August 3d, 1820. In 1832, moved to Ohio, and in 1836 to Boone county, Illinois, where he lived until 1841, then went to Ottawa and was admitted to the bar in 1842, when he moved to Hennepin, Putnam county, Illinois, where he was postmaster from 1844 to 1848. Probate judge from 1848 to 1850. Member of the state legislature in 1851 and 1852. Governor Madison's private secretary for two years. In 1855, appointed consul to Hamburg, and acted as such until the spring of 1857. During that spring he went to Washington, to arrange a postal treaty between that country and the United States, for the general exchange of German mail through Hamburg. He succeeded in the undertaking and also in reducing the rate of postage from thirty to ten cents. He showed such ability in the office as consul, that the consulate was held open for his return a year, which he did not do, but came to Minneapolis in June, 1857, and located, opening a general insurance business, which he has followed to the present time. He was secretary of the state senate from 1861 to 1864, and elected mayor of Minneapolis in 1870 and 1871. Married Miss Delia A. Payne, in St. Louis, Missouri, May 31st, 1854. They have had three children, all living, Addie H., Alice D. and Agnes L.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 501

AMES, Ezra B. was born at Garden Prairie, Illinois, August 26th, 1837. Is a son of Dr. A. E. Ames, who made the first kiln of brick in Chicago, and was one of the early settlers of that region. Mr. Ames moved with his parents, in the spring of 1852, to Minneapolis, attended the first school in this city, taught by Mary A. Schofield; only six pupils attended, himself and two brothers, two brothers of the McLeod family and Emma Tuttle, in a log house near where the Washburn mill now stands; also attended the first courts held in the old government mill, and first religious services, at which the Rev. Mr. Pond officiated. In 1854, he engaged as clerk with Tuft, Reynolds and Whittemore in the mercantile business, remained until 1856, when he opened a general store at Dayton and continued until 1860. Then engaged in milling at Rockford, Wright county, until 1862, when he enlisted in First Minnesota Cavalry, served his term of one year, and was honorably discharged. On his return, opened in company with Mr. Hopper, a meat market, on the corner of Washington and Nicollet Avenues, which business he followed until 1871, after which he engaged in the commission business, and latterly has given his attention to his own real estate and tenement business. Was married at Minneapolis, January 1st, 1864, to Mary C. Hopper, one of the early comers to this city. They have had four children, two now living; Edgar C. and Frederick. A.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 228

ANCEL, J. L. was born in France, January 22d, 1822; served as a soldier seven years in France; married to Miss Zelie Genevry in 1850; emigrated to America in 1852; remained a short time in New York; removed to Connecticut, and staid four years; returned to New York, where they remained until 1857, when they removed to Minnesota, and located in Bloomington. In 1874, purchased a farm on section 17; sold, 1878 ; rented the farm on which he now lives the same year; has purchased 160 acres in section 19. They have five children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 233

ANDERSON FAMILY

Prominent among the early settlers here are the Andersons, three generations of whom are now living in the town, and number upwards of one hundred. Robert Anderson was born in Knocknabossett, county Cavan, Ireland, in 1824. Remained with his father until the age of twenty-six, being employed in milling and farming. In 1850 came to America, arriving at Galena, Illinois, November 5th, where he spent four years farming. Came to Minnesota, April, 1854, first stopping in Bloomington, then to Eden Prairie where he has since resided. February 1850, married Miss Mary J. Hill, daughter of John and Elizabeth Hill, of Ireland. From this union nine children were born; Those now living: John H., Samuel G., Robert J., Mary J., Anna E., Joseph M., Margaret E. and Agnes E. When he came to this region there was but one store in Minneapolis on the west side, and no settler between Fort Snelling and Bloomington except Rev. Gideon H. Pond and one French family. Into this wilderness he brought his family by way of the Minnesota River on the rickety little steamer Iola. This little craft became partially disabled on the way up, obliging the, passengers to carry wood and water to keep her in motion. This pastime was indulged in several times during the journey from St. Paul, to the general annoyance of the passengers. Mr. Anderson has been prominent in matters of education, temperance and Christianity; now has a son in the University fitting for the ministry.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 503

ANDERSON, Andrew was born in Norway, January 22d, 1845. Came to the United States in 1866, and settled in Iowa, where he worked on a farm for two years. Moved to Hastings, Minnesota, in 1868, and worked three years on a farm and in a saw mill. Came to Minneapolis in 1871, and opened a saloon, which he continued for one year, then worked at coopering three years, and is now located at No. 1225 Fifth street south, in saloon business. Married Miss Clara Anderson; they have one child, Louisa.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 503

ANDERSON, C. H. born in Sweden. Moved to the United States and settled in Minneapolis in 1872, where he worked for six months in a meat market, then engaged for the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad Company until 1877, when he made a trip to his old home in Sweden, remaining there for nine months, when he returned to Minneapolis and engaged in the clothing business until the spring of 1880, when he engaged in the wood trade on the corner of Washington Avenue and Sixth Avenue south.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 503

ANDERSON, C. P. born in Sweden, in 1836. Came to America in 1866, and worked in Chicago four months, thence to Red Wing, Minnesota, working six months; then to Wisconsin, working at his trade, carpentering, for two years, thence to Lake City, keeping boarding house and saloon five months; then to Burlington, Iowa, working at his trade for two years, thence to New Ulm, Minnesota, in 1872, for a short time, and to Minneapolis, working at his trade until 1878, when he established his present business at 1421 Washington Avenue South.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 234

ANDERSON, James was born in the same town in Ireland, as his brothers Robert and William. His early life, like that of his brothers, was devoted to milling and farming. In 1852 he came to America. Lived one year in Hanover, Illinois. In 1858 came to Minnesota and located where he has since lived, on section 14. In common with other pioneer settlers, he staked out his "claim," which he subsequently secured by pre-emption and entry. In the spring of 1854 brought his family from Illinois, coming from St. Paul on the steamer Iola. Was married February 26th, 1852, to Miss Sarah Hicks, of Cavan county, Ireland. Have had nine children, Robert H., Eliza J., John W., Thomas, Matilda, James, David H., Robert, and a son who died in infancy.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 234

ANDERSON, John H. was born at Camp Creek, near Galena, Illinois, November 7th, 1850. When four years of age he came with his parents to Eden Prairie and remained with his father until the age of twenty-three, receiving a common school education, with one term at the graded school in Excelsior. Married January 2d, 1874, to Miss Ida E., daughter of Aaron and Matilda Gould. Has two children. Edward W., and Jennie G. Owns a good farm one mile east of Eden Prairie station.

 

From "1868 - 1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" published by the Maple Plain Garden Club - ClaudeP@aol.com

ANDERSEN, Niels, born Feb 9, 1887, came to New York n the vessel New York from Wnne Bjerg, Denmark on Jan 2, 1914.  He came with the encouragement from his uncle J. L. Andersen, who was his sponsor from America, and settled in Wolbach, Nebraska.  A friend of his uncle's needed a blacksmith in his shop so Niels came.  His wife, Nielsine, followed with their two sons, Carlo and Helmer, on April 14, 1914.  They also had a daughter Norma (Mrs. Harold Starky) and a son Egon, of Wayzata, born while living in Wolbach.

In Dec of 1925, Niels and his family moved to Maple Plain.  He then became the village blacksmith locating in the blacksmith shop formerly owned by a Mr. Peterson, where the Zwieg lawn and snow equipment store is now, then later moved across the highway.

In 1935, he moved into the old Mason place, which was a part of a farm that was homesteaded on June 16, 1856 by William Fogleman.  In 1871, a strip of land 150 ft. wide, was sold across the 80 acres for $100 for the railroad.  In 1897, the Masons were paid $30.00 by Northwest Telephone Exchange to acquire right of way across the land.  Highway easement was filed on March 9, 1922 for $1200.00.  Anna Mason had a private cemetery on the land, near the house, where her husband had been buried.  After her death in April, 1926 she also was buried there.  Later the bodies were removed.  Mr. O. W. Olson, the new owner, rented this house and some land to Niels Anderson for 13 years before Niels bought it in 1948, where he lived until his death on May 18, 1963.  His wife preceded him in death in August 1958.

Niels and son Helmer remained in the blacksmith shop until about 1959.  In 1937 Niels and son-in-law, Harold Starkey, bought two school buses and started transporting high school pupils to Mound.  Orono district was formed; more buses were bought and so they transported children for Orono district only.  A family corporation was formed, involving Helmer and son Randy.  The newly remodeled bus garage is located directly west of the old railroad bridge housing three new buses.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 234

ANDERSON, William was born January 1st, 1837, in North Ireland. When sixteen years old, his father, a prosperous cottager, and mill owner, died and in 1854 William came with the family to America, settling in Jo Davies county, Illinois, where he attended school one year, then went to Galena to work in a store, where he remained until the fall of 1855, when he came to Minnesota crossing the Mississippi at Fort Snelling, and went to Eden Prairie. His mother made a home-stead claim of the farm he now occupies, on section 13 and 14, where she lived to see the third generation of her family; 103 grandchildren and l3 great grandchildren. She died in March, 1878. William Anderson married Miss Rachel Mitchell, April 28th, 1858. They have eleven children; Harvey, Martha A., Lizzie E., Ida B., Fannie, Loretta H., Jennie L., Julia M., Alfred W., Arthur H. H., and Alice. P., He has been active in educational and religious matters and largely interested in the erection of the three churches in the township. Was one of a few who hewed and hauled the logo (logs?) for the first school-house in his district in 1856. Two of his children are now attending the High School in Minneapolis.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 325

ANGELL, A. O. was born in Bridgewater, Vermont, in 1834. He moved with his parents to Michigan, then to Ohio, and in 1854, came to Minnesota, and made a claim in Maple Grove. June 8th, 1865, he married Mary Atkinson. They have two children living. He lived in his cabin covered with bark and with floor of basswood slabs, until 1858. Mr. Angell helped to cut the first road leading from Osseo to Rice Lake.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 325

ANGELL, A. O. was born in Bridgewater, Vermont, in 1834. He moved with his parents to Michigan, then to Ohio, and in 1854, came to Minnesota, and made a claim in Maple Grove. June 8th, 1865, he married Mary Atkinson. They have two children living. He lived in his cabin covered with bark and with floor of basswood slabs, until 1858. Mr. Angell helped to cut the first road leading from Osseo to Rice Lake.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 503

ANKENY, A. T. was born at Somerset, Pennsylvania, December 27th, 1837. Received his education at Hiram, Ohio, and at Jefferson College, Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania. Studied law with John D. Ruddy, at Somerset, and completed his studies in the office of Hon. J. S. Black, Attorney General of the United States, at Washington, D. C. He was admitted to the bar April 1st, 1861. In February, 1862, on the accession of Hon. E. .M. Stanton to the War Department, was appointed by him to a position in the Quartermaster General's office, and held the same until the close of the war. He then resumed the practice of law at Somerset, and for a time was connected with one of the banks at that place. Came to Minneapolis in the spring of 1872, and became associated with his brother, W. P. Ankeny, in the manufacture of lumber. In 1874, the firm built the Galaxy flouring mill. Continued in the lumber business until 1877, at that time resuming the practice of law, which he has since continued successfully. Mr. Ankeny was married at Wheeling, West Virginia, May 2d, 1861, to Miss Martha V. Moore, daughter of John Moore, long identified with the interests of Wheeling. They are the parents of five children: Florence, Robbie, Nellie, Mattie, and Sallie. Residence on Western Avenue, on the bluffs outside of the city limits, where he owns forty acres of land, portions of it being very desirable residence property.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing. (See also W. P. Ankeny below)

Page 503

ANKENY, W. P. was born at Somerset, Pennsylvania, October 4th, 1821, died at Minneapolis, December 20th, 1877. In early life he was the publisher of a newspaper in his native town, also in mercantile business, and holding the position of postmaster. He went to California during the excitement attending the opening of that state, and engaged successfully in the stock business. On his return east he engaged in running a steam tannery. In 1857 Mr. Ankeny came to Minneapolis, and from that time until he was confined to his room by illness, was closely identified with the material growth, and Political interests of this city. He built a saw mill at the Falls in company with a Mr. Clement and Mr. Robinson of this city. They continued to do a lucrative business until 1872, when he was joined in the lumbering business by his brother A. T. Ankeny. He built the Galaxy mill, in 1871, which was burned and rebuilt, and went down in the explosion of 1878. He served as councilman for the sixth ward, and in the fail of 1861, was elected senator for the 27th district. He was largely interested in the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railroad, and the building of the Minneapolis Harvester Works. Was mainly instrumental in starting the first Building and Loan Association in the city, and was at one time its president. The many enterprises he was engaged in furnished at all times employment for a large number of men. His son W. S. Ankeny now occupies a responsible position at the Galaxy mill.

FROM "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voyaguer Press 1890


(Click for large image)

ANKENY, W. P. Until his sickness and death, which occurred in 1877, W. P. Ankeny was one of the most successful and enterprising of the pioneer citizens. He came to Minneapolis in 1857, at the age of thirty-six, and at once took a prominent position in the community, and was identified with all its important interests. From 1858 to 1861 he was postmaster of the young city. He, with others, built a saw mill and later on the Galaxy Flour Mill, which was burned and rebuilt and destroyed again in the explosion in 1878. He served in the local Council and in the State Senate with conspicuous ability, and was largely interested in the establishment of the Minneapolis Harvester Works and the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad. He had a hand in starting the first building and loan association in the city and was its first president.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 504

APPLEBY, John F. born at Whitesborough, Oneida county, New York. When five years of age came with his parents to Wisconsin, and was reared on a farm. Enlisted in 1862 in the Twenty-third Wisconsin regiment, and served until honorably discharged July 4th, 1865, at Mobile, Alabama. During his term of service he invented the repeating magazine fire-arm, while at the siege of Vicksburg, which he sold to Thomas W. Lane of Boston, Massachusetts. After his return home he engaged in farming until 1868, during which time he completed the "Appleby Twinebinder," patent issued in 1869,and has since then received patents on several different binders; also patents on self-rakes and reapers, the latter known as the "Appleby Reaper." Came to Minneapolis in March, 1880, and arranged with the Minneapolis Harvester Works to manufacture his twine-binders, engaging with the company as mechanical superintendent of their works. He completed his binder at Beloit, Wisconsin, where they are still manufactured. They are also manufactured at Plano, Illinois, Excelsior Works, Miamisburg, Ohio, and at Whitewater, Wisconsin. Mr. Appleby was married at Mazo Manie, Wisconsin, in 1847, to Miss A. D. Spink. They have three children, Ruby G., J. Percy and John Roy.

 

Obituary, taken from the Minneapolis Journal, Sunday, May 14, 1914, and submitted by Claudia Schuman

APPLIN, Andrus B. who died May 10, was well known among the old settlers, having come to Minnesota in 1858. At the beginning of the Civil War, when a young boy, he enlisted in Co. B. Fourth Minnesota as a private and at the close of the war was mustered out as Second Lieutenant.

In Grand Army circles, where he was always active, being a member of the Memorial Day committee and the U. B. U. and a charter member of O. P. Morton Post, of which he was commander four terms.

At the time of his death he was a member of Billy Mortimer Post. The funeral services were at the family home in Minnehaha park, and were conducted by the Billy Mortimer Post.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 288

ARCHER, James born in Washington county, New York, in 1822. He lived there fourteen years; then moved to Lake county, Illinois, and engaged in farming until 1854; then he went to Dakota county, Minnesota, and remained until 1865, when he went to Minneapolis, and started in the livery business, which he followed for seven, years. He then moved to Northfield, and built the Archer House. In 1878 he returned to Minneapolis, and in 1880 bought, and moved to his, present location. Married to second wife, Sarah D. Mouser, in 1873. They have three children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 504

ARCHIBALD, A. R. Principal and proprietor of Archibald's Business Academy. A native of New England. Graduated at Dartmouth college, New Hampshire, and came West to take charge of the Stevens Seminary, Glencoe, Minnesota, filling the position acceptably until the fall of 1876, when he became commandant of the Minneapolis Military Academy. In the fall of 1877, opened the present institution to meet the wants of young people coming into the city, whose education was limited. At first the outlook for success was poor, but at the close of the year twenty names were enrolled. Since then, the business has developed in spite of opposition and at present the enrollment numbers sixty names with a prospect of twenty more during the year. Young men and women from the country and city who have not the time for a full course, here find just what is needed to prepare them for the practical pursuits of life.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 272

ARCHIBALD, David was born in Nova Scotia, in 1845, and moved with his parents to Hennepin county. He enlisted in 1861, in Second United States Sharpshooters, afterwards attached to First Minnesota Regt., and served three years; was wounded at Cold Harbor, and remained for six months in the hospital at Alexandria. He was honorably discharged at St. Paul, in 1865.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 272

ARCHIBALD, William was born in Nova Scotia, in the year 1811. He moved to Hennepin county in 1855, and made a claim where he has since resided. He is one of the founders of the Liberal League Society, is its President and most active member. In 1834 he married Diana C. Hutchinson. They had ten children. Mrs. Archibald died in 1863.

 

From "Our Independence 1854-1981"  Submitted by Claudine Pearson. ClaudeP@aol.com

ARENS (AREHNS) Frank (Francis) was born April 18, 1833 in Alsace Lorraine, the iron ore country of Germany.  His married Anna Mary Meinz, of Rhine provinz, Kreis Brunn, Germany.  In 1860 they homesteaded near Loretto.  They found their Indian neighbors peaceful if they were treated well. The names of their ten children were:  Anna, Mary, John, Catherine, Nicholas, Margaret, Francis, Peter, Joseph and Lena.  Their great grand children living now in Independence are (1980): Richard Klaers, James Klaers, Mrs. Richard (Marge Laurent) Jacobs, an Mrs. Dean (Angela Laurent) Triplett

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 504

ARMSTRONG, Solon was born at Sutton, New Hampshire, May 15th, 1834. Attended the Wesleyan University at Middletown, Connecticut, four years, then read law with George and Foster, Concord, New Hampshire, until 1857, when he came to St. Anthony and continued his studies with Lawrence and Lochren, until the fall of 1857; admitted to the bar the same year, also elected justice of the peace. Held the office till 1864, when he entered the government service in the quartermaster's department one year, making a trip across the plains with Col. Thomas's expedition. He then went into the office of Todd, Gordon and Co., till 1870 when he was appointed by the city council, city justice and clerk, which offices he held until the unity of the two cities, when the office was abolished. He called a meeting of the first council for the union of the two cities. He then entered the Zenith flouring mill office as book-keeper, till 1877, then purchased the old City Mill, after which Mr. M. B. Rollins became associated and they continued till the spring of 1878. In company with Mr. C. Noble bought the grocery interest of O. T. Swett and is at present located in Masonic block, University Avenue East Division. Mr. Armstrong was a member of the city council from 1873 to 1878 and president the last two years. Was married in Minneapolis February, 1874, to Mrs. Sarah B. Redfield, who died April 14th, 1879. Has three children living, Bessie P., Solon and Joseph.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 504

ARNELL, J. H. was born in Orange county, New York, February 20th, 1836. Came to Minneapolis May 10th, 1857, and worked at his trade, harness-making, for William Murphy. In 1858, went into business for himself as one of the pioneers in the harness business. At that time there were but two other shops in Minneapolis. His first partner was John Conover, who sold out in 1860, leaving him alone. In 1862, he enlisted in the Second Minnesota Battery, serving nearly three years. Was discharged from the hospital at Nashville, Tennessee. Returning to Minneapolis, he resumed his old business. August 1874, he joined in partnership with L. Christlieb, and has continued business with him since. Was married to Francis Peet, of Minneapolis, September 23d, 1874. They have two children: Paul B. and Mabel.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 505

ARNOLDY, John was born in New Ulm, Brown county, Minnesota, September 4th, 1860, where he was brought up to the harness-making trade, and worked until 1877, when he came to Minneapolis, and worked for leading firms in the city until he formed a partnership with Andrew Keim in 1880, and located at 120 Plymouth Avenue.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 505

ARNOLDY, Peter born in Germany, March 1st, 1849, and raised on a farm. Came to America in March, 1872, stopping a short time in Chicago and New Ulm, and reached Minneapolis in November, 1872. Is a cabinet-maker by trade, and by his industry and skill has built up quite a large business at his present place, 1503 Washington Avenue south. Was married in 1875, to Lucy Breyen, of Germany. They have two children: Herman J. and John M.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 504

ARONSON, B. born in Sweden, December 1st, 1845. Was raised on a farm until twenty-one years of age, when he learned the trade of mason, which he has followed constantly since. Came to America in 1867, and located in Minnesota, and commenced work for the Sioux City Railroad, building bridge foundations. Worked in Scott county one season and came to Minneapolis in 1872. Worked for George McMullen in 1872, working for himself alone until the firm of Patterson and Aronson was established, in 1877. They now employ from twenty to thirty men.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 505

ASLESEN, K. was born in Norway, December 6th, 1853. Came to America with his parents who settled in Houston county, Minnesota, in 1857, where he remained until 1867, when he moved to Brownsville. Soon after, moved to Lansing, Iowa, where he worked as clerk in a grocery for six years. Thence to New Albin, engaging in general mercantile business until March, 1879, when he moved to Minneapolis and became one of the firm of Aslesen Bros. in a general grocery trade at 511 Washington Avenue south. In April, 1880, he bought his brother's interest in the concern and has since continued alone.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 265

ASTROPE, Henry was born in Canada, in 1839, and came with his parents to Minnesota in 1855. He returned to Canada three years later, and remained one summer, then came again to Minnesota. In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company F of the Second Regiment, and reenlisted in 1863, serving until discharged for disability, in January, 1865. He has since drawn a pension. He was married in 1873, and has two children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 505

ATWATER, F. A. was born in Burlington, Vermont, in 1830, where he conducted a hotel for several years. Moved to Illinois in 1857, and in 1873 to Delano, Minnesota, where he engaged in the clothing business. September 1st, 1880, he bought the Clark House, located corner Fourth street and Hennepin Avenue, 100x118 feet, four stories high, eighty rooms. Office, dining-room, billiard hall, bar and mercantile sample rooms on the ground floor. Reception room and parlors on second floor. A conveniently arranged and well conducted house. Mr. Atwater married Miss Naomi N. Bradley, June 16th, 1856. They have four children: Stella C., Fanny, Edward and Hubbard.

 

From "Minneapolis Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voyaguer Press 1890


(Click for large image)

ATWATER, Judge Isaac Judge Isaac Atwater's biography and the history of Minneapolis are pretty well mixed up. Ever since his arrival at the Falls, in 1850, the two have been interlapping each other. He left a successful law practice in New York to grapple with the problems of lie and law in the wild west. He soon stepped to the front in the little community, and stayed there. He was one of the first University regents and did valuable service for many years. From its establishment in 1851 till his elevation to the Supreme bench in 1857 he edited the St. Anthony Express, the pioneer paper. In 1864 he resigned the judgeship and went west, but after three years' separation returned to his first love, and did not desert her again. He has served the community in many ways, official and unofficial, being especially interested in educational matters.


History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 499 (See next entry also)

ATWATER, Judge Isaac In few men are more rare combinations of talent required, than in pioneers of new countries; invincible courage, enterprise tempered by prudence; promptness and decision united with calm reflection; sagacity combined with enthusiasm, are indispensable requisites. Trades, professions, creeds, in short all that has a tendency to make a successful commonwealth must be represented as near the beginning as possible. Among those who planted the foundation for the future city of Minneapolis, and assisted in laying the corner stone of the state of Minnesota, none contributed more zealously than Judge Isaac Atwater, who arrived at St. Anthony Falls, in 1850. He is a native of Homer, Cortland county, New York, where he lived and worked on the farm until he was sixteen years of age, which life he then abandoned for the necessary preparation incident to a profession. He received a thorough classical education, and graduated at Yale college, in 1844, and two years subsequently in like manner graduated at Yale law school. Promptly upon being admitted to the bar he commenced a successful practice of law in New York city, which was continued until his removal to St. Anthony, where immediately upon his arrival, he entered into partnership with Hon. John W. North, and continued the practice of his profession in the district and supreme courts of the Territory. A few months subsequently to his arrival, he was appointed one of the regents of the state university of Minnesota, and, on the organization of the board, was made secretary, which responsible position he held for nine years, performing the duties in the most satisfactory manner, and this, too, without compensation. It is proper to remark that had it not been for the judicious course punned by Judge Atwater and his colleagues in these early days. none of whom ever received any compensation for their services, but on the other hand contributed large sums of money from their own pockets in the interest of the institution, there is no probability that the stately edifice which we all are so proud of would have been built at all, or at least not in this neighborhood. To the first board of regents are the citizens indebted for the inauguration of the University of Minnesota, at the Falls of St. Anthony. Several liberal citizens, then residents on both banks of the Mississippi, such as Calvin A. Tuttle, Esq., also subscribed and paid, large subscriptions to enable the regents to commence the erection of suitable preparatory buildings for the use of the university. In 1861, upon the advent of the St. Anthony Express, Judge Atwater, in addition to his numerous other duties, became editor-in-chief of that paper, and conducted the editorial columns with great ability until his elevation to the supreme bench upon the organization of the state government in 1857. His vigorous and able pen soon gave this paper, then published on the extreme frontier, a national reputation, and it was the source of the introduction of thousands and thousands of emigrants into the territory as permanent settlers.

In 1853 he received the suffrages of the citizens of Hennepin county for district attorney. This office, in a new country, where the inhabitants are concentrated from the four quarters of the globe, is attended with difficulties, which are unknown in old settled communities. In 1857 he was elected one of the associate justices of the Supreme Court. His elevation to a seat on the supreme bench necessarily caused him to vacate the editorial chair of the St. Anthony Express, but his habits of industry were continued in frequent contributions of articles of rare merit, which appeared in the leading periodicals of the day. In 1864 he resigned the office of supreme judge, in consequence of a determination to visit the Pacific States for the purpose of resuming the practice of law. He opened an office in Carson City, Nevada, extending his practice to Virginia City, in that state. He remained three years on the Pacific slope, when he returned to Minneapolis, and has since that time continued the practice of his profession, occupying at the same time, for years, a seat in the city council, a portion of which time he was president of the board of aldermen. For eight years he was a member of the board of education, an important trust for which his knowledge, habits, and interest in schools peculiarly fitted him. The three last years of his service with the board, he was president of that body. It will be seen that Judge Atwater has bestowed a good deal of his valuable time to municipal as well as educational purposes, and to his influence and services are the citizens largely indebted for the healthy and prosperous condition of the matters closely connected with the city affairs, as well as the excellent system of schools which abounds in Minneapolis. He is also a valuable member of the board of trade, which in a measure, shapes the future destinies of the city. Judge Atwater belongs to the Protestant Episcopal Church, in which he has occupied numerous positions and trusts in the interest of Christianity, and is always ready to bestow aid and assist in the elevation of mankind.

In 1849, Judge Atwater was married to Miss Permelia A. Sanborn, a lady who is universally respected by a large circle of acquaintances. Her beautiful home is surrounded with the choicest floral gifts, the fruits of her handiwork. She takes much interest in the propagation of plants, flowers and vines, which make our homes cheerful and happy. Her good works in these things were held in such high estimation by the State Horticultural Society, which she was unanimously elected an honorary member of that society. The Judge and Mrs. Atwater have had three children. Cora, the eldest, a bright little girl, died in 1852, aged fifteen months. L. Isabel, the second daughter, is the wife of Col. A. C. Reid, of San Francisco, California. The youngest, John B., is also a graduate of Yale College, has chosen the same profession as his father, and is the junior member of the firm of Atwater and Atwater, attorneys at law.

From "History of the Minnesota Valley", published by the North Star Publishing Company, 1882.

Page 280

ATWATER, Judge Isaac, is a native of Homer, Cortland county, New York, and a graduate of Yale College, also of the Yale law school. Upon being admitted to the bar he commenced a successful practice in New York city, which he continued until 1850, when he removed to St. Anthony and entered into partnership with Hon. John W. North. Judge Atwater was appointed one of regents of the State University, also secretary of the board, which responsible position he held for nine years. He was editor-in-chief of the St. Anthony Express from 1851 until his elevation to the supreme bench, upon the organization of the state government in 1857. In 1864 he resigned the office of supreme judge in consequence of a determination to visit the Pacific states, where he remained three years in the practice of his profession, after which he returned to Minneapolis. For years he occupied a seat in the city council, and was a member of the board of education, of which body he was for three years the president. Judge Atwater belongs to the Protestant Episcopal church, and is one always ready to bestow aid and assist in the elevation of mankind. In 1849 he married Miss. P.A. Sanborn, a lady who is universally respected.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com

AUBART "AUBERT", PETER,
Peter Aubart was born in Luxembourg a small country near Alsace Lorraine, France and south of  the Netherlands and Belgium of German decent, on Jun.25,1807.His wife was Katharina, and Her maiden name is not known. They came around 1852 to the New Schwanden area of Brooklyn Township. The name is of German origin and was spelled like it sounded or pronounced because of the German alphabet -e- is pronounced as - a - and was spelled Aubart instead of Aubert which was more original in the spelling. They settled south of what is now known as 109th Ave. No. and built their first cabin. A newer home was built around 1916 on 109th Ave. No. There were 5 children born of this union. 1.Nicholas 1837 - 1924, 2.two twins  John 1843 - 1934, 3.Margaret 1843 - 1934, 4. Thomas 1850 - 1909, 5. Rosa 1854 - 1919.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 252

AUSTIN, L.A. born in Norway in 1851, emigrated to America in 1869 and settled at Morris, Minnesota; he remained there until 1870, then moved to Minneapolis and lived six years, then settled on Lake Minnetonka. He was married in 1873, to Bessie Larson of Litchfield. They have one child, Ida.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 505

AUSTIN, Ezra H. born at Hogansburgh, New York, April 4th, 1844. At the age of twelve went to work in the Howland mills at Waddington, New York, where he remained until 1860, when he went to Williamsburgh, New York, and ran a mill. August 11th, 1861, enlisted in the One hundred and second New York Volunteers, and served with the regiment through the war; mustered out June, 1865, came to Winona, Minnesota, in 1867, and ran the "Glen mills" for two years; moved to Wasioja, in the "Star mills" two years; came to Minneapolis in 1870, was with the Washburn mill eighteen months, the Pillsbury twelve months, and in Wisconsin six months; went into the Palisade mill in 1873, and has been there since. Married Miss Mary Fleener, March 4th,1870. They have one child living, Etta H.