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BARBER, Edwin R. Edwin R. Barber was the president of the Barber Milling Company. He was born in 1852 in Vermont. His family moved to Minnesota in 1855. He attended the University of Minnesota, but did not graduate. He worked in grain milling first for Gardner, Pillsbury, & Crocker, and then Cataract Mills. He also lobbied for the construction of the Lake Street bridge. He married Hattie Sidle in 1873 and they had four children.

 

From "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voygeuer Press 1890


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BASSETT, Daniel Daniel Bassett, who has been identified with the lumber and banking business of the city since the early days arrived here in April, 1855, from Wolfboro, New Hampshire. He has been twice honored with a seat in the Legislature, was appointed postmaster in 1865, has been a county commissioner, member of the school board and of the board of equalization. During the Indian war he, with other volunteers, marched to the rescue of the garrison the refugees at Fort Ripley. governor Ramsey, after the Indians were conqueered, appointed him and Capt. Peter Berkey, of St. Paul, as commissioners to appraise damages and afford relief to settlers who had suffered from Indian depredations. He has been an active participator in many local enterprises that were instrumental in developing the business interests in the city.

 

From "1868 - 1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" published by the Maple Plain Garden Club. Submitted by Claudine Pearson. ClaudeP@aol.com

BATDORF, John Jacob - "Well now, it's root, hog or die!"  These were John Jacob Batdorf's words of advice to his daughter, Margaret, and young William Mills when he was told they had been married a few hours after they reached Fort Snelling on May 8, 1857.  William had hired out to one of the pioneers on the wagon train just to be near "Maggie".  That they "rooted" is evidenced by the flourishing family tree that remains in the area.

John Jacob Batdorf, usually known as Jacob, and his family left New Castle, Indiana, with a group of pioneers in April 1857 headed for Minnesota.  They traveled by covered wagon to the Ohio River where they loaded their possessions on flatboats.  They traveled down the Ohio to the Mississippi and from there up river to Fort Snelling.  Most of the group went west from Fort Snelling and settled in what is now Independence Village.  After being enroute for a month, supplies ran very low.  The story is told that the family lived almost entirely on dandelion greens for three weeks.

Jacob's family were his wife, Lydia; son's John, William, Jacob and Baritone. His daughters were Margaret and Maria.  John married Margaret Branford, William, Jane Styler and Baritone, Jeanette Lager.  Margaret married William Mills and Maria married his younger brother, Robert M. Mills.  Jacob Jr, killed before the Civil War when he was hit by a falling tree.

In 1862 the settlers were alarmed by rumors of an impending Indian uprising.  The men of Rockford thought it wise to build a stockade.  They hurriedly used whatever materials were available, part of which happened to be the planks which had recently been sawed at the mill for John Batdorf's barn.  Holes were cut in the planks for the men's rifles.  The Indians did not attack.  After about two months the stockade was torn down and John built his barn.  The rifle holes were reminders of early days as long as the barn stood.

When the call was given for volunteers for the Civil War, Jacob enlisted with his sons John and William and his son-in-law, William Mills.  With most of the able bodied men off to war the women were sometimes called upon to perform rather unladylike tasks.  The meat supply ran out.  Margaret Batdorf Mills and Mrs. Styner bravely took it upon themselves to butcher a hog for their families

After the war the men, except William Batdorf, who died of fever, returned to their farms and to the rearing of their families.  John's children were William, Sarah, Albert, Eva, Melvin, John, Niles and Allen.  Williams' children were Dora, Norman, Stella, Bertha, Joseph, Roy and Henry.

The women occasionally visited in the afternoon.  Margaret Batdorf chided her neighbor, Mrs. Williams, for not having visited her for so long.  Mrs. Williams said, "I have so much work to do, I just can't get away."  Margaret said "Bring your work along."

One day Margaret called her daughter, Eva, to the window and asked, "What in time is that coming down the road?"

They couldn't decide what the big white thing was bobbing along the road. When it came very near, they discovered "the thing" was Mrs. Williams carrying her freshly filled straw tick.  She would sew up the end of it as she visited.  For Mrs. Williams, whose sense of humor was as big as her straw tick, the two-mile walk for ten minutes work was worth it for the merriment she created.

Three generations of Batdorfs attended the Evergreen Grove school.  They were Niles and his daughters: Mildred (Mrs. Ernest Walker) of Seattle, Washington; Leona (Mrs. Eldon Anderson) of Maple Plain; Verna (Mrs. Earnest Hamilton ) of Maple Plain and his son B. Niles Batdorf M. D., of Mankato, Minn; and his grandchildren - the Andersons - Virginia (Mrs. Frank Ferrin) of Wayzata, and Marie (Mrs. Albin J. Jacobson) of Skanee, Michigan

 

As listed in the Proceedings and Report of the Annual Meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - May 11, 1899 and 1900

BAUSMAN, Abner Laycock was born in Etensburg, Cambria County, Pennsylvania, March 25, 1834. He was son of Adam Bausman of Pitts, Pennsylvania, who was born in Pitts, Pennsylvania, 1799. His father came from Bingen on the Rhine. His mother, Caroline Laycock, was born in 1808. She was the daughter of Gen. Abner Laycock, United States senator from Pennsylvania, during Jackson's administration. He was born in Virginia, having obtained a liberal education for that period. Dr. Bausman entered the dental profession in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He came to Minnesota in 1856, where he preempted a claim in Blue Earth County. He then returned to the east. The next spring he came up the river on the "Northern Bell," arriving at Minneapolis May 22, 1857, and opening an office on Helen street.

He at once became connected with the religious and social life of the young metropolis. He joined the First Baptist church, and was elected a trustee. He was one of the originators of the Athenaeum Library Association. Was superintendent of the first colored Sunday school in Minnesota for eight years. Was instrumental in establishing the Homeopathic Medical school at the university. He was married to Fanny R. Abraham, daughter of Hon. Jonathan P. Abraham, on the 25th of November, 1863. Four children were born, two died in infancy, the others are now living. Bertha, now Mrs. Frank H. Page, of Springfield, Mass., was born Sept. 17, 1864, and George A., of this city, was born April 23, 1874. His wife died Aug. 19, 1876.

January 16, 1879, he was married to Rebecca Webster Fenby of St Louis, daughter of the late Col. Richard Fenby, formerly of Baltimore, Md. Of this union three children were born; Richard Fenby, born Nov. 5, 1879; Alonzo Linton, born Oct. 27, 1883, and Marrian Douglas, born June 21, 1886 - all of whom are now living.

 

From "1868 - 1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" from the Maple Plain Gardening Club. Submitted by Claudine Pearson. ClaudeP@aol.com

BEER, John came to Independence Township from Jordan, Minnesota, in 1880.  He built his home where the old Hedin house now sands.  He used a stone boat and a team of oxen to clear the land.  He made a shoulder yoke and hauled water from a spring in the creek.  During dry spells he would carry water from the lake.  They lived on the farm for 14 years.  Five children were born, John, Priscilla, Hilton, Harry and Jesse.  Lorna was born after they moved to Maple Plain.

In 1894 the Beer family moved into Maple Plain where john Beer had a hardware store and lumber yard.

Hilton Beer was 17 when the cut was put through Maple Plain for the railroad.  He worked on the steam shovel and traveled around the country with it.  Later he worked for Preston McCulley in the ginseng and became interested in growing it.  In 1931 his home on Lake Independence was built.  He also built five cottages and at one time had 25 boats to rent out for fishing and pleasure.  Here he worked in his ginseng, maple syrup, and strawberries until he passed away on Nov. 23, 1962.  His son Merle and family live in the same house he built.  Merle's grandfather, John, built a home at Jordan that still stands near the highway going to Shakopee.  Jessie James stopped at their place to water his horses on is way to rob the bank at Northfield, Minnesota

 

Information compiled by Larry Martin.

BELL, James Ford. James Ford Bell (1879-1961) initially was a salesman for the Washburn-Crosby Company and became its vice president in 1915. He was born in Philadelphia, the son of James Stroud Bell, the former chief executive of the Washburn-Crosby Company since 1888. James Ford Bell was a 1901 graduate of the University of Minnesota, with a bachelor of science degree and a major in chemistry. He became a director of the Washburn-Crosby Company in 1910. He also was the president of four firms, the St. Anthony & Dakota Elevator Company, the Barnum Grain Company, the Royal Mills, and the Kallispell Mountain Flour Mill. Additionally, he was a director of the Lehigh Valley Rail Road and a director of the Northwestern National Bank and the vice president of the Minnesota Art Museum. During World War I, he was appointed by the U. S. Food Administration as chairman of the Milling Division and, in 1918, he accompanied Herbert Hoover on his European Hunger Relief Mission. For this, he was awarded the Belgian Order of the Crown and was made a member of the French Legion of Honor. James Ford Bell became president of Washburn-Crosby Company in 1925 and, three years later, was responsible for the founding of General Mills, a consolidation of many western and midwestern milling companies. He became chairman of the Board of General Mills in 1932, a position that he held until his retirement in 1947. Throughout his life, he was active in national and international affairs. James Ford Bell was an inveterate outdoorsman, an early conservationist, a lifelong scientist and leading philanthropist. Mr. Bell was a driving force in the building and development of the Museum of Natural History at the University of Minnesota, renamed in his honor in 1966. Established in 1872, the James Ford Bell Museum of Natural History is recognized as one of the premier natural history museums in the country. A devoted friend of the University of Minnesota, Mr. Bell served as a member of the Board of Regents from 1939 until 1961. The James Ford Bell Library, a part of the Library at the University, houses Mr. Bell’s collection of rare books dedicated to the field of trade containing fine manuscripts, books and maps dating to the earliest available records throughout the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. He married Louise Heffelfinger in 1902. He also was the most generous individual donor to the Department of Decorative Arts, Sculpture and Architecture of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Bell's gifts range from the beautiful American and English silver pieces which are the foundation of the Institute's distinguished collection to two elegant rooms from the colonial Charleston, South Carolina, home of Colonel John Stuart. James Ford Bell allocated a portion of his estate to the Foundation which bears his name upon his death. Charles Heffelfinger Bell was James Ford Bell's son, became the chairman and president of General Mills, Inc., and was involved in the creation of the Belwin Foundation and the Belwin Outdoor Education Laboratory and its relationship with the St. Paul school system. The Phillips Eye Institute, built in 1986, is a specialty hospital of Allina Hospitals & Clinics dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases and disorders. Phillips Eye Institute was the vision of many people, designed to function as a free standing eye specialty center associated with Mount Sinai Medical Center. It was developed by and for ophthalmologists. Jay Phillips was the main benefactor of Mount Sinai Hospital and a strong supporter of Mount Sinai's Division of Ophthalmology. Because of his generous philanthropic support, The Phillips Eye Institute bears his name.

 

As listed in the Proceedings and Report of the Annual Meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - May 11, 1899 and 1900

BELL, John Edson was born at Brownsville, Jefferson County, N. Y., Oct. 10, 1834. He came to Minneapolis May 5, 1857, and entered the store of Amos Clark, as a clerk, on Bridge Square, corner of Hennepin avenue and First street. The next year, with Alexander Campbell of New York for a partner, he opened a general store on Bridge Square under the firm name of J. E. Bell & Co. In 186o his brother David bought Mr. Campbell's interest, and the firm name was changed to Bell Brothers, and the business continued until 1867, at which time the business was sold to J. W. Johnson and J. A. Wolverton. For the next three years. Mr. Bell was located in New York as Eastern buyer for Auerbach, Finch & Scheffer, wholesale dry goods dealers of St Paul.

In 1870 Mr. Bell returned to Minneapolis, and with E. S. Jones organized the Hennepin County Savings Bank, of which bank he was cashier until Mr. Jones' death, in 1890, since which time he has been its president. The bank is now the oldest savings bank in the state, and during its thirty-one years of existence has never passed a dividend, and has paid to its depositors over $800,000 of interest on their deposits and are now paying $45,000 of interest annually to their depositors, who are largely the laboring people of Minneapolis. During the financial panic of 1893 a few of its depositors gave notice of withdrawal of funds, but when the limit expired not a depositor wanted to withdraw funds except as in ordinary times.

Mr. Bell has been connected with the Plymouth Congregational church most of the time since its organization and was a teacher in its Sunday school for many years.

 

Obituary - submitted by James Colin Best, South Australia --Email address:  gumnut23@hotmail.com

BEST, George, 98yrs, formerly  of 4629 York Avenue South. Survived by daughter Veronica Griffith, sister Marguerite Thompson, Minneapolis. Graveside sevices 11 am Friday in Lakewood Cemetery. Friends may call 5-7pmat the Albin Chapel, Paul, Ralph and Jack Albinson, 2200 Nicolet Avenue.

George Best was living in the Bloomington Nursing Home at the time of his death and the Director was a Veronica Griffith who was also the informant.

(George Best also had two brothers who came to the USA. They both worked in the copper mines at Calumet in Houghton Co, Michigan. I have details of one, Victor Emanuel Best and his Wife Annie who are both buried in Calumet. The other, John Henry (aka Harry) Best and his Wife, also Annie and two sons Carl and Dalfred are not able to be found at this time.)
George Best died July 4, 1973 in Hennepin County MN.

 

Obituary - Minneapolis 'Star', Tuesday, 22nd Oct 1957. Page 15B--submitted by James Colin Best, South Australia --Email address:  gumnut23@hotmail.com

BEST, Mrs. Minerva Omega, age 58 of 3916 30th Avenue South. Survived by husband George, daughter Veronica Hicks, three sisters, Mrs Myrtle Whiteman, Pierre,South Dakota, Mrs Bernice Halverson, Cleveland, Ohio, brother Jack
Ovitt, Lakeview, Oregaon. Services Thursday, 11am. The Albin Chapel, Paul Albinson and Sons, Directors, 2200 Nicolet Ave. Internment in Lakewood Cemetery. (Minerva had been married twice before she married George, the previous one was to a Roy W Thomas, father of Veronica Hicks.)

 

BOEHME, Christopher A., (1865-1916) was born and died in Minneapolis, was educated at the University of Minnesota, taking the special course in architecture, and entered practice under Warren Dunnell in 1882. In 1896, he began his own firm which he continued until his death. From 1902 to 1911, he was the partner of Victor Cordella (1872-1937). Cordella was born in Krakow, Poland, studied at the Royal Academy of Art, Krakow, Lemburg, Germany, and under a succession of architects in Minneapolis and St. Paul (among them Cass Gilbert, W. H. Dennis, Warren Dunnell, and Charles Aldrich) before entering into a partnership with Boehme. The partnership lasted from 1903 to 1911, after which each man practiced alone for the remainder of his career.

 

As listed in the Proceedings and Report of the Annual Meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - May 11, 1899 and 1900

BOSTWICK, Lardber was born in Toronto, Ont., June 20, 1815, and was married March 6, 1843, to Eliza Kennedy. They had four children, two of whom are now living, Mrs. F. G. O'Brien of Minneapolis, and Mrs. H. A. Nott of Chicago.

Judge Bostwick died April 13, 1897, age eighty-two years, leaving a wife, the two daughters above mentioned, also a grandson, Edward J. O'Brien, a granddaughter, Mrs. W. O. Wolf, daughter of Mrs. Nott.

In 1843 judge Bostwick moved from Toronto to Chicago, and from thence to St. Anthony Falls in1850.

He served his first term as justice of the peace in 1852. He was also the fourth judge of probate of Hennepin County; also court commissioner. He served as assessor of internal revenue from 1862 to 1866.

Judge Wm. Lochren, in an article some years ago, on reminiscences of the first lawyers in Hennepin county, says- "Lardner Bostwick was a man of unusual mental power, good literary attainments, and knowledge of the law, and Withal of spotless integrity and commanding dignity in court, while very genial and companionable in his intercourse with members of the bar and others. He was a most efficient magistrate, at a time when, owing to the rough manners of a pioneer community, such a man was needed to preserve order and respect for law."

 

BOSSERT, Gottlieb A. We trace our family history back to Gottlieb A. Bossert, who was born on February 3, 1841 in Gelterkinden, Switzerland.  We believe his father's name was Aden Bossert.   Gottlieb came to America in 1866, and after remaining one year in Philadelphia, came to Hennepin County, where he was engaged in farming for three years.   He then "followed the plow" for eleven years in Cambridge, Isanti County, Minneasota.   While in Hennepin County, on March 15, 1868, Gottlieb married Margaretha Ebert, who was born in Illinois of Prussian parents on August 14, 1850, and who arrived in Minnesota in 1862.   Gottlieb and Margaretha had six children.  In June 30, 1880 Census of Inhabitants of Stanford, in the County of Isanti, State of Minneasota, the first five children were listed as: Frederick (11 years), William (7 years), Louisa (5 years), Adam (3 years, and Silvia (6 months).   Gottlieb went to Anoka in the fall of 1880 and built a three-story frame building on Second Avenue, where he called it Farmer's House (one account called in "Farmer's Hotel, Saloon and Livery").   On February 2, 1881, Louisa Bossert died of spinal meningitis at 6 years of age.   She was buried in the St. Fredolin Cemetery in the settlement of New Schawndon ("New Switzerland").   The cemetery today is located near the Elm Creek Park in Maple Grove, Minneasota.   A son, Henry, was born to Gottlieb and Margaretha in 1881.   Margaretha died on November 5, 1882, at age 32, of scarlet fever.   She was also buried in the St. Fridolin Cemetery.   Gottlieb subsequently married Sophia M. Prigge, who was born in 1850, on August 3, 1884.  On August 15, 1884 at 2:20 a.m., a fire was discovered in the privy of the Van der Veld and Page's roller skating rink.   The fire spread quickly and "destroyed the Lincoln Mill and laid the whole business part of the city of [of Anoka] in ashes from [the] Rum River east to Third Avenue. Eighty-six buildings were burned, and the loss amounted to more than $600,000."   The Farmer's House was among those buildings destroyed by the "great fire".   Gottlieb's loss was $5,000, and he was insured for $3,000.   Sophia died on August 16, 1888 and was also buried in the St. Fridolin Cemetery.   There is no record of any of the children born to Gottlieb and Sophia.   There is no record of what Gottlieb did until his death of dropsy on September 30, 1888, at age 47 years, 7 months.   Gottlieb's obituary reads:   In Anoka, Sunday, September 30, 1888 - Gottlieb Bossert, age 47 years.   The deceased has for a number of years been proprietor of the Farmer's House, on Second Avenue.   Only a few months ago his wife died.   Five children, three quite young are left orphans.

Typed by Alvin Ebert - Dec 29, 1999  ALEBERT@AOL.COM
Following data provided by Joan Bossert to Allan Potter 12/28/99.     
 

 

From "Minneapolis Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromely. Voyaguer Press 1890


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BOTTINEAU, Pierre Pierre Bottineau was at one time the most skillful guide in this northwestern country and officiated in that capacity on many important expeditions. His mother was an indian. His father died while he was a boy, and Pierre took to the woods for himself. In the course of his wanderings he reached Fort Snelling in 1834. In 1845 he settled at the Falls of St. Anthony and was identified with the interests of the place until 1854.

 

From "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voyguer Press. 1890


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BRACKETT, George A. Modern Minneapolitans are familliar with the name and face of George A. Brackett. It is not necessary to tell them much about his enterprise and public spirit. Mr. Brackett was one of the many who flocked to the Falls of St. Anthony in 1857, and pinned their faith firmly to the city of desstiny. He came West from Maine, and at once became prominent in the community. He hasa been interested in flour mills and other industrical enterprises. He assisted personally and with his money in raising the First Minnesota regiment, gave the regiment its first meal, and accompanied it to the front, though he was not himself a member. He organized the Minneapolis fire department, and wasa its first chief. He was Mayor of the city in 1873, and has served the public well in many ways, both officially and unofficially. He is reckoned the friend and helper of every worthy enterprise. (SEE ALSO BELOW)

As listed in the Proceedings and Report of the Annual Meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - May 11, 1899 and 1900.

BRACKETT, George Augustus was born Sept 16, 1836, at Calais, Maine. He arrived at St. Anthony April 30, 1857, and that summer drove the meat wagon for Stimson & Hayes, and in the winter worked on the dam of the Minneapolis Mill Company. The following spring he opened a meat market of his own.

In 1862 he was given the contract to supply beef to the troops that were serving against the Indians. During 1864 he transported and supplied the troops under General Sully and the Garrison at Fort Wadsworth with provisions.

Later he operated the Cataract Flour Mill for several years in partnership with W. S. Judd, under the firm name of Judd & Brackett.

In the summer of 1869 he was assigned the duties of supplying a party of directors of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, who were out looking over the proposed route for the railroad across the plains, which he did successfully.

From 1870 to 1875 Mr. Brackett was purchasing agent for the Northern Pacific Railway Company, and interested as a contractor in the building of the road from the St. Louis River through to Bismarck.

In 1873, in partnership with Anthony Kelly, he built the stone block at the corner of First avenue south and Second street, and the next winter engaged in packing pork.

Mr. Brackett was instrumental in organizing the fire department of Minneapolis, and in 1869 was made chief engineer, which position he held until 1872. At the first city election, in 1867, he was elected alderman from the Third ward. In 1873 Mr. Brackett was elected mayor of Minneapolis.

After his retirement from the city government he was appointed surveyor general of logs and lumber for the Second district by Governor Davis, which office Mr. Brackett held successfully for eight years.

Mr. Brackett was appointed one of the commissioners of the park board of the City of Minneapolis at its organization, which office he held for six years.

In 1890 he was president of the Minneapolis Stock Yards and Packing Company, located at New Brighton, in which he was heavily interested. The venture was not a success financially and the panic of 1893 forced Mr. Brackett to the wall, and he disposed of his property to satisfy his creditors. When the discovery of large quantities of gold was made in the Klondike region he went out there, hoping to secure another fortune for his family. His many friends will be pleased to learn that his prospects in that direction are good at the present time.

Mr. Brackett was married to Miss Anna M. Hoit, daughter of William Hoit, Aug. 19, 1858. Mrs. Brackett died in December, 1891, leaving husband, seven sons and one daughter.

 

From "1868 - 1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" published by the Maple Plain Garden Club. Submitted by Claudine Pearson. ClaudeP@aol.com

BRADFORD, George came with others from Indiana to Independence at the close of the Civil War, traveling together by covered wagons.  Their land, pre-empted in Section 34, later known as the Kowalk farm, lay next to Gustav Johnson's on the West.  They were near neighbors of the Stinsons.  There were seven children, three boys and four girls, all living at home at the time their home burned to the ground.  The family of nine were made welcome at the John Stinson and Gustave Johnson homes until a new building could be made ready with the help of neighbors.  Mr. Bradford died October 29, 1895.  He and his wife Ellen are buried in Lewis Cemetery.  Kate, the last known member of the family died in Great Falls, Montana in 1957.  Percy Bradford, only son of John Bradford, lived most of his life in this community and passed away while visiting in Florida.

 

From"1868 - 1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" published by the Maple Plain Garden Club. Submitted by Claudine Pearson. ClaudeP@aol.com

BRILEY, Sam Born in Canada in 1835. In 1858 he was married to Jane Delahunt who was born in the Province of Quebec in 1841.  They settled on their farm at Armstrong in 1876 where 6 children were born to them.  One was Mrs. Frank Lucas of Little Fork, MN and another was Mrs. B. R. Hoisington of Maple Plain.  The home of the Brileys was near Armstrong station.  Sam's brother, Landon and wife lived where the Fred Pagenkopfs now live. Claude Briley was Clauson's son, and grandson of Sam Briley.  Landon was married to Annie Briley who in later years lived in Anoka and passed away there in 1966 at the age of 101, leaving one daughter, Mrs. Gladys Wellman.

 

BROOKS, Anson Strong, (1852-1937) was born in Oswego County, New York. His family moved from Redfield, New York to Beaver, Minnesota, in 1856. Brooks' father, Dr. Sheldon Brooks (1811-1883), was a member of the House of Representatives in the second Minnesota State legislature (1859-1860). Anson Brooks became a grain dealer in 1873 and continued in that business until 1897. In 1896 the Brooks and Scanlon families, consisting of Dwight Frederick Brooks, M.D. (1849-1930), Lester Ranney Brooks (1847-1902), Anson S. Brooks, and M. J. Scanlon, of Stillwater, Minnesota, went into business together in Minneapolis, operating sawmills first at Nickerson, Minnesota, then at Cass Lake, Minnesota, and then incorporating the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company in 1901 to operate a large plant the firm erected in Scanlon, Minnesota, served by the subsidiary Minnesota and North Wisconsin Railroad. With his brothers, Dwight F. Brooks and Lester R. Brooks, Anson S. Brooks formed the Minneiska, Minnesota company, Brooks Brothers, to continue the Brooks family grain business started by his father. Brooks Brothers later expanded into the lumber business and Anson Brooks became involved in a number of lumber companies and lumber holding companies, and he organized the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company in 1901. In 1905, the founders of the firm scouted timber in the Pacific Northwest, purchasing two large blocks of Ponderosa pine timberlands in Deschutes County, Oregon. In 1908, the American entrepreneurs Dr. Dwight Brooks and Michael Scanlon saw that Powell River, north of Vancouver, British Columbia, was the perfect location for a newsprint mill and formed the Powell River Company. The Powell River Company turned out the first roll of newsprint manufactured in B.C. in 1912. It soon became one of the world’s largest newsprint plants, in competition with Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, founded by Julius Bloedel, a Seattle lawyer, and the H. R. MacMillan Export Company, founded by Harvey (H.R.) MacMillan, B.C.’s first Chief Forester and his good friend, Whitford Van Dusen, another forester. Michael Scanlon was an owner of the Brooks, Scanlon, & O'Brien Logging Company, of Stillwater, British Columbia, which was named after Scanlon's home town. In 1905, the firm also purchased tracts of Southern pine near Kentwood, Louisiana, where it erected another sawmill plant, served by the subsidiary Kentwood and Eastern Railroad. In 1910, the plant at Scanlon ran out of timber to mill, so the company moved to Oregon, with the headquarters of the company remaining in Minneapolis. The Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company built a lumber mill in Bend, Oregon, in 1916, after the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway completed a rail line to the town in 1912. Bend hosted logging operations by two Minnesota forest companies, the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company and the Shevlin-Hixon Company. In 1950, the Shevlin-Hixon Company was purchased by Brooks-Scanlon. By 1917, it was apparent to the Brooks-Scanlon management that its Louisiana plant eventually would run out of timber (it did in 1923) and the company bought out Carpenter-O'Brien's holdings and its Eastport, Florida, mill. By 1928, the company owned or controlled approximately 400,000 acres of timberlands located in Lafayette, Taylor, Madison, and Jefferson counties, Florida. At that time, the firm had sawmills with a capacity of turning out 100 million board feet of lumber per year, as well as a planing mill, dry kilns, storage sheds, warehouses, and headquarters for a logging railroad at Eastport, 13 miles from Jacksonville on Florida's St. Johns River, with deep-water docking facilities to accommodate ocean going vessels. The Live Oak, Perry & Gulf RailRoad was purchased by the Brooks-Scanlon Corporation from the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad in 1928. Brooks-Scanlon purchased the South Georgia RailRoad in 1946. In 1954 the Southern RailRoad purchased both railroads and operated them as a shortline until merging them into the Georgia Southern & Florida RailRoad in 1971 as the Live Oak, Perry & South Georgia RailRoad. The officers of the Brooks-Scanlon Corporation, with offices in Minneapolis, Minnesota, included M. J. Scanlon, president, located in Minneapolis, J. S. Foley, vice president, located at Eastport, Florida, A. S. Brooks, treasurer, located in Minneapolis, and P. A. Brooks, secretary, also headquartered in Minneapolis. Increases in freight rates forced Brooks-Scanlon to move to a location more central to their timber supply, causing the closure of the Eastport plant in 1929 and construction of a new plant at Foley, Florida, named for the company's general manager, J. S. Foley. In 1959, the Powell River Company, Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, and the H. R. MacMillan Export Company merged into MacMillan Bloedel. Brooks-Scanlon merged with Diamond International in 1980, ceasing to exist as an independent corporation. Dwight Frederick Brooks resided in Zumbro Township, Minnesota, early in his career. 5055 Connaught Drive Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, a brown and white 35-room mansion, with three story Tudor architecture, set in the heart of fashionable Shaughnessy Heights known also for its numerous ornamental cherry and maple trees, was built by Lester Brooks of the Brooks Scanlon Lumber Empire in the early 1920's. In 1927, the mansion became the property of a prominent Vancouver family by the name of Hager, whose wealth had come from the fishing industry, and the Latter Day Saints (Mormon) Church purchased the mansion for $65,000 in 1960. More recently, Conley Brooks, Sr., was the CEO of the family-owned Brooks Scanlon, Inc., and also was a board member of Brooks Associates, Inc. and Brooks Resources Corporation, a trustee of Carleton College, a trustee of the Marbrook Foundation, a board member of the First National Bank of Minneapolis, a board member of the First Bank System, and a board member of the Northwestern National Life Insurance Company.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 235

BROWN, Nathaniel has been a resident of Minnesota since 1855, and of Hennepin county since 1874. Was born in Franklin county, N. Y., Nov. 9th, 1825, and in early childhood accompanied his parents to Indiana, from which place the family removed to Fulton county, Illinois, in 1840. Soon after this, his father died and he went with the family to Des Moines county, Iowa, where he remained on a farm for about nine years. March 10th, 1853, married Miss Harriet N. Van Nice. Have had eight children, seven of whom are living: Rosa Belle, Stephen B., Frank A., Clara L., Sadie, Oscar H., and Charles L. He entered the army in 1864, enlisting in Co. A., 4th Minn. Inf. Veterans. Was with the regiment through Sherman's march to the sea. Received his discharge at Louisville, Ky., in 1865. Returned to his family in Scott county, where he had removed from Iowa in 1855, remained there until 1874; when he sold his farm and located at his present place.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 289

BROWN, Otis H. was born in Hampshire county, Massachusetts, in 1811. He lived there nine years; then moved to Niagara county, New York. At the age of seventeen, he went to Pennsylvania, and engaged on the Pennsylvania Canal for sixteen years, when for a time he ran steamboats on the Ohio River. In 1854 he came to Hennepin county, took a claim near Osseo, sold it, and now owns a small place near the village. He settled here before the government survey, and was chairman of the Board that named Maple Grove.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 296

BROWN, Seneca born in Rutland county, Vermont, in 1826. Moved to Niagara county, and lived eighteen years, then to Lenawee, Michigan, where he learned the wagon and carpenter's trade. He came to Hennepin county, and settled in Maple Grove. Established his wagon shop in Osseo, in 1876. In 1854 he married Elizabeth Willetts. They have four living children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 521

BROWN, W. W. was born in Vermont, in 1843. He moved to Iowa in 1863, and followed the hotel business fifteen years. He removed to Lake Calhoun, Minnesota, in 1878, and after having in charge, one year, the Lake Side House, he came to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. He is now the proprietor of the Theatre Comique, and also of the Sherman House, 129 Second street north.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 521

BROWN, Zelora E. was born in Brookfield, Madison county, Now York, February 9th, 1834. When four years of age, his parents moved to Genesee, New York, where his father received a severe injury, by a falling tree, which resulted in his back being broken. What is quite remarkable, he is still in good health, having lived the last forty years with his lower limbs paralyzed. At the age of twenty-one, Mr. Brown came west, but soon returned to New York, where he married Miss Mary R. Armstrong, December 30th 1856. They came to Dakota, Wisconsin, in 1859, where he engaged in farming until 1861, when he was drafted, but accepted the alternative of paying three hundred dollars, and remained with his family. In the fall of the same year he engaged with N. F. Griswold, of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, as traveling agent for agricultural implements, with whom he remained four years, three years of the time being spent at Rochester, Minnesota, where he was superintendent of Mr. Griswold's business in that section. Here, a son, Walter R., was born to him. He then moved to Irvington, Iowa, and become a partner with J. R. Armstrong, in a general merchandise store, remaining five years. Another child was born there, Clarence Z. In 1871, Mr. Brown came to Minneapolis, where he again engaged as solicitor and collector for Mr. Griswold, traveling seventy-five thousand miles by team. He formed a partnership with H. O. Hamlin, in 1877, which still exists, dealing in real estate.

 

From "1868-1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" published by the Maple Plain Garden Club. Submitted by Claudine Pearson. ClaudeP@aol.com

BRYANT, Jacob was born in 1805 in South Carolina.  He was orphaned by an epidemic when eight years old, and was bound out to a neighbor until he was eighteen.  Released, he walked to Indiana to join friends who had gone west earlier.  He married and fathered Sarah Ann who became the wife of Jacob Hursh of Long Lake.  His wife died and he remarried.  He and his wife Mary brought Sarah Ann and their own nine children when they came to Minnesota in 1856.  They homesteaded on Pioneer Creek in West Independence Township.  Mary died in 1864, and Jacob married Catherine Hunstberger who had come from Pennsylvania with her family about 1863.

Catherine bore him five children, of whom Rufus Irwin was the youngest.  Jacob lived to be ninety-eight, and died in 1903.

Rufus married a neighbor, Minnie E. Lawrence, in 1899. She was the daughter of George Lawrence who went from Maine to Wisconsin to work for an uncle who was lumbering there.  He then went to Vernon Center, then to Montevideo to take  tree claim.  Wanting timberland he later went to Minneapolis and then bought the William Murphy farm near Lyndale.

Minnie and Rufus moved to Maple Plain n 1902, the land having changed hands from the John Wasson homestead to William Budd to Charles Ingerson to William Haney, then deeded to the Bryants n 1903.  They tore down the old house and built a new one which burned the winter of 1910-11.  Twenty men and women, members of the Royal Neighbors lodge, were gathered at the Bryant home for the noon meal when Louis Olson who managed the lumber yard, telephoned to say their roof was on fire.  In spite of all the help present the house burned and was replaced by the present Bryant house.  The Bryant children were Alvin, Hugh, Clayton, Kenneth, Louise, Lorna and Lawrence, Hugh, Clayton and Kenneth still live here.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 521

BRYANT, James was born at Bedford, Indiana, January 22d, 1843. He came with his parents to Minneapolis in 1856; his father, R. R. Bryant engaged in mercantile business on Washington Avenue. In 1861, James Bryant enlisted in the, First Minnesota Volunteer infantry; he was wounded in the battle of Gettysburg in 1863, and in July, 1865, was honorably discharged. He was, elected register of deeds for Hennepin county, in 1866, which office he held until 1871. He then entered upon the abstract business, in which he continued until 1876, when he entered the clerks office as deputy clerk of court and served until January, 1881, when he again went into the abstract business. Mr. Bryant was married in this city to Miss Abbie Robinson, in November, 1865. They have had six children, five of whom are living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 243

BRYANT, Thomas was born in Maine, December 10th, 1843. In 1856 he came to Saint Paul, spent one year, then went to Ohio. Enlisted in company B, Third Ohio Veteran Volunteer Cavalry. Mustered out at Nashville, Tenn. Returned to Ohio and turned his attention to coopering. April 19th, 1868, married Amelia Hanford. Came to Minneapolis in 1872, and worked at cooperage till 1878, when he came to Minnetonka and worked at his, trade one year longer. Then he bought the farm on which he now lives.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 234

BRYANT, William V for many years a resident of Eden Prairie, was born in Saco, York county, Maine, March 21st, 1821. Is a lineal descendant of Stephen Bryant, of the old Plymouth colonies, and of the same family line with William Cullen Bryant. His father, John Bryant, was a seafaring man, and died in 1820. At the age of thirteen, William went to Salem and learned the saddlers' trade, remaining until 1836, then sought adventure upon the ocean, his first service being with Commodore M. C. Perry, of the steamer Fulton, the first steamer built by the U. S. government. Also sailed on the ships Admiral and Henry Clay; was three years on the whaler America, in Pulaski Bay, Prussian possessions. During eighteen years of ocean life, visited many places of historic interest, sailing around the world, and encountering many thrilling adventures and remarkable preservations. In 1852, abandoned ocean life and in May, was married to Miss Hannah Shepherd, of Boston, Mass. Six children have been born to them, Sarah L., Blanche M., Martha A., William M., Rose A., and John M., only four of whom are living. Came to St. Paul in July, 1852; remained one year, then removed to St. Anthony, remaining there for eight months, then removed to his present location.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 522

BUCKENDORF, Henry is a German, and was born November 2d, 1844. He attended the public schools of Germany until the age of fifteen, when he learned the business of florist. He served one and a half years in the Prussian army. Soon after, he emigrated to the United States, coming directly to Minneapolis, where he at once engaged in the business of florist, in which he still continues, and has one of the finest establishments in the city. Mr. Buckendorf is unmarried.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 522

BUCKENDORF, William was born in Germany, in 1833. He attended the public schools of his native country until 1848. He then was instructed in floral gardening. In 1857 he came to America with Judge Ames, and was in the employ of Dr. Ames until 1863, when he purchased his present gardens. Mr. Buckendorf was the first florist in this city. He was married to Barbara Weber, September, 1860, who died sixteen years later, leaving four children. Mr. Buckendorf was married in October, 1878, to Maria Gerdis.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 265

BUDD, W. W. a native of Ohio, was born in Preble county, in 1833. In early life he removed with his parents to Indiana, and in 1855, he engaged in the lumber trade, which he followed for two years. In 1863 he enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Light Artillery, served two years, participating in ten engagements. In 1865 he came to Independence, bought and cleared the farm he now occupies. He married Emeline Cunningham, of Polk county, Indiana, In 1855. They have five children; Ella F., Anna C., Lilly M., William S., and Charles J.

From personal information and research compiled by Claudine Pearson. For further information please contact Claudine - ClaudeP@aol.com

BUDD, William White came from Indiana (born 4 Dec 1833 in Preble Co. Ohio, son of Col. Casper Budd who was born 16 Nov 1805 in Lycoming co, pa, son of John Budd from Germany and of Mary (Bosworth) Budd ) with his wife Emmeline (Cunningham born 12 April 1833 in Parke Co, IN, daughter of James Cunnningham and Anna M. Allen Cunningham) and four children in 1865.  Later a son, Charlie, was born. They cleared and farmed the land where Halgren's Creamery now stands. The old Odd Fellows Hall and many homes were later built on the site and also the Bryant Farm. William had three brothers who also settled here - Henry, Dan and Joseph.  Joseph returned to Indiana. This family and others, Dave Cox, the Franklins, Foglemans, and Bradfords, came together at the close of the Civil War, traveling with their families by covered wagon and suffering many hardships.  All of these men were veterans of the ninth Indiana Battery.  Later, with the advent of the first railroads thru Maple Plain, the cut for the railroad was made thru part of the Budd farm.

William Budd and wife, Emmeline, were parents of Charles, who was deputy sheriff of Hennepin County for many years and of Aimee, Clinton, Mary Louella and Ethel Irene (Mrs. Wm. R. Schultz) who still lives at Maple Plain, also her daughter, Mrs. Deloris Cole, and son Richard Schultz.  One son, Robert, lives in Minneapolis and son, Harry, in Florida.

Henry Clay Budd, brother of William Budd, his wife Eliza Ann, two daughters, Mattie and Alice and son Oliver arrived here in 1865, having traveled by ox-team with other settlers from Indiana.  They settled on Section 25 where they built a log cabin.  Later they built  a large house on what is now Budd Street.  It was the first frame house in Maple Plain.  Henry Clay and Eliza lived in this house until they passed away.  Their son, William Marshall passed away here in 1921.  His children were Howard, Gladys Setzler, Claude, Meryl and Lois Welker. William Marshall's sister, Nellie, married Joseph Dyrsdale.  They are survived by one son Marvin of Minneapolis.  Gladys Setzler and husband, Lawrence, live in Brooklyn Center, also their daughter Mrs. Robert Schultz and family.  The Claude and Meryl Budd families still reside in Maple Plain, and Howard lives in Wayzata. The Claude Budd's have two sons, William and Robert, and the children of Meryl are James, Gerald, Kelly, John, Patricia and Rosemary

From "1868 - 1968 Maple Plain & Independence Past - Present" published by the Maple Plain Garden Club.

Col. Casper Budd married Kallista A. Stratton, who ws born 18 May 1805.  Their photos are in the Museum in Maple Plain on Rte. 12.  Kallista's father ws Timothy Stratton and her mother Esther Horton.  This Horton line I have back to the 1600's, when Barnabus Horton and his family first came to Connecticut in 1635/37, and then settled in Southold, L.I., New York.  They were Puritans.  There are many Horton's buried there, and there is a lighthouse that is named after the family.  If you want to see the lighthouse, you can go to
www.longislandgenealogy.com  there is other information there regarding the Horton's if you look.     Casper got his title of Colonel when he fought against "The Knights of the Golden Circle" , which was an organization in Indiana that was pro slavery, plua aomw orhwe issues.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 522

BUERFENING, Martin was born in Prussia, October 13th, 1847. He lived in his native country twenty-one, years, during which time he learned harness-making. In 1868 he came to America, proceeding directly to Minneapolis, where he settled, and worked at his trade until 1875. He was then appointed on the police force, where he has since officiated. He was married to Eustena Weinard, of Wilmington, Delaware, in 1873, who bore him three children : Ida, Mary, and Anna.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 522

BUGBEE, G. C. was born at St. Johnsbury, Vermont, April 15th, 1837. He was reared to manhood in his native place, and in 1857 came to Minneapolis. Mr. Bugbee loaded the first lumber for shipment from this city, on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad, and has been engaged in that business since. He is at present with the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway, also St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railway. Mr. Bugbee was married at St. Paul, May 22d, 1863, to Miss Dora M. Gabert.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 217

BULL, James A. was born in Jefferson county, New York, February, 1834. He remained there with his parents, until 1859 when he came to Minnesota, and settled on the farm he now occupies. He owns 158 acres of fertile land and has improved it, until it now ranks among the best farms in this town. Mr. Bull was married in 1856, to Mary E. Comstock, who bore him one child, Mary L. Mrs. Bull died in the winter of 1865. He was married again in 1867, to Miss Amy L. Cooper; has four children: James H., Alvah M., Coates P. and Anna B.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 253

BURCH, A. D. born in St. Lawrence county, New York. September, 1843. Moved to Michigan in 1870, remained there until 1873. Came to Excelsior, Minnesota, in 1878. Attended the Wesleyan Seminary in St. Lawrence county, N. Y., graduated in the law department at Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1869. He followed teaching several years; the present term is his third one at Excelsior as principal of the graded schools. Married in 1870 to Lotta Johnson, of New York. Two children have been born to them.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 273

BURCHFIELD ' A. was born in 1847, and came to Hennepin county with his parents. He is the inventor of the U. S. Military Portable Forge, a very ingenious and useful contrivance; when ready for moving, it is mounted on wheels, with fireplace, forge, tool box and fan bellows, a model of completeness. Mr. Burchfield has commenced manufacturing, and selling state rights.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 273

BURCHFIELD, C.W. was born in Pennsylvania in 1815. He moved to Wisconsin in 1855, and came to Hennepin county in 1856. He worked in St. Anthony as carpenter, carrying provisions on his back to his family in "Lenz;" went six miles for twelve bushels of potatoes, and gave half to have them hauled home; built his first log house in 1856. He is one of the fathers of Medina; married in 1842, to Christina Frantz. They have five children living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 355

BURG, Adam, a native of Germany, was born in 1826, at the village of Moetach. He attended school until twelve years of age, and afterward worked on a farm. In 1852 he emigrated with his father to the United States. He resided in Chicago three yews. In 1855 he came to Minnesota, settled at St. Anthony, and has since been a permanent resident of Hennepin county. His wife was Therese Kohler. Their marriage occurred in 1866. Of the nine children born to them, six are living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 522

BURKE, Edward was born at Montello, Wisconsin, August 19th, 1857. While yet a boy he moved with his parents to Winona, Minnesota. At the age of twelve he commenced as a Miller at Minnesota City, and remained for five years in the employ of the Winona Mill Company of that place. In May 1879, he removed to Minneapolis, where he was employed in the Washburn Mills eight months; he then engaged with the Standard Mill as packer, and has since remained at that place.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 522

BURRELL, L. W. was born July 13th, 1852, at Dover, Maine. Here he attended school until eighteen years of age, when he changed his home to Clearfield, Pennsylvania; he then learned blacksmithing. In 1872 he removed to Minneapolis; for six years he was in the employ of other parties, and in 1878 opened a shop and resumed his trade, until the establishment of the Hame Factory. Mr. Burrell was married November, 1877, to Miss Flora Rich, who bore him two children, Rose and Thomas.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 522

BURWELL, William E. was born at Buffalo, New York, November 24th, 1844. He moved to Now York city in 1854, thence to Minneapolis, November 4th, 1874. Here he entered the First National Bank as general book-keeper, which position he held until May, 1880, he then being elected assistant cashier of the Northwestern National Bank.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BUSCHJOST, Louis was born in Germany, February 14th, 1850. He acquired a knowledge of shoe-making in his native country, and worked at it until 1874,when he came to the United States. He first settled in Cincinnati, Ohio; thence to Saint Joseph, Missouri, where he remained until 1877, when he came to Minneapolis, and has since continued in his business. Mr. Buschjost was married to Emma Altwein, of Wisconsin, who bore him a son; Otto.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.
Page 217

BUSH, Frederick was born in Stockhausen, Prussia, December 12th, 1849. He remained in his native country until 1869 when he emigrated to America. He came to Minnesota, and settled in Richfield, Hennepin county, December, 1869, owns 15 acres on section 15, Township 28, Range 24, where he has a pleasant home.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 522

BUSHNELL, C. R. was born in Jefferson county, New York, November, 1832. He engage in farming until 1848, when he went to Racine, Wisconsin, and learned the machinists trade; here he remained until 1855, then removed to Waconda county, Illinois. In 1857 he located at Lake City, Minnesota, employed in manufacture of sash, doors, blinds, etc. Meeting with reverses, caused by the panic of 1857, he was made destitute and through the winter of 1857-1858 he subsisted principally on corn meal and molasses. In 1862 he went to St. Paul and was employed in the Pioneer foundry, by Mr. Gillman; the spring following he came to St. Anthony and engaged with Charles Soott in his foundry. Mr. Bushnell started a machine shop in 1864, on the west side of the river and made the shafting for the first woolen mill ever built in this city. He sold out in 1865, and that year formed a co-partnership known as C. R. Bushnell and Co., but afterwards better known as the St. Anthony Iron Works. Since January, 1880, he has been a member of the firm of Bushnell and Spear, Northwestern Stove Works. Mr. Bushnell was married September, 1855, to Miss Delia Kitz. Their children are, Charles, Arthur and Elbert.

 

BUSHNELL, Ellsworth, Late in the year 2000, while searching Westminister's Archives, senior pastor Timothy Hart-Anderson found a dusty old scrapbook titled "Book of Remembrances, Class No. 1. Compiled by ten boys ages 10-12, and inspired by their teacher Andrew Benton, the book is filled with photos, information about the boys, inspiring quotes from notable regional and national figures, and messages to future students. Click on the link below to explore the Book of Remembrance and read the legacy left by ten boys, including Ellsworth Bushnell.
http://www.ewestminster.org/classof01/biographies

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 243

BUTLER, Alanson G. was born in Hallowell, Maine, December 30th, 1816. When 23 years old went to New York, and remained there three years. Worked five years in the lumber regions of Pennsylvania. In 1856, came to Minneapolis, stayed one year, then went to Wright county and opened a farm. Lived on it till 1875, when he came to Minnetonka where he has since lived, and for the last two seasons, carried on the dairy business. September 22d, 1853, married Louisanna Marsh, of Pennsylvania. They have one child, Minnie May.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BUTLER, B. F. was born in Maine, in 1829. He moved to Detroit, Michigan, in 1854, and was with the Michigan Central railroad. In 1856, he located at Minneapolis, engaged in the sash and blind business; a few months after, he took a claim at Forest City, remaining on it one year; thence to Fair Haven, Stearns county, and purchased a farm, which he tilled until 1873. He then returned to this city, where he has been employed in the North Star Iron Works and millwright in the different mills throughout the state. Married Miss Eliza Tucker, in 1860. They have one child living; Allana.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BUTLER, G. S. was born at Clinton, New York, March 4th, 1834. He engaged in book-keeping for twenty years, previous to his entering mercantile business. He located in Minneapolis in l876. Mr. Butler was married August 6th, 1862, at Clinton, New York, to Miss Sophia A. Comstock, Harriet E., and Alice B., are their children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BUTLER, H. C. was born in Maine, in 1838, where he remained until coming to Minneapolis, in 1857. He is the proprietor of the Minneapolis Mill Pick Depot and Iron Works, which business he has carried on since his coming to the city. Mr. Butler was married to Miss Eunice L. Baine of this city, in 1857. They have seven children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BUTLER, W. E. is a native of Maine, born May, 1848. At twelve years of age he learned the trade of saw filer, and continued in it until 1871, when he commenced learning photography of W. H. Jacoby. In 1874 he commenced business in his present location on Central Avenue, Nicollet Island. Mr. Butler does a general photographic business, including portraits in india ink, water colors, and oil. He was married to Miss Fannie Whittier, of this city, in 1872. They have one son: Henry Edwin.

 

As listed in the Proceedings and Report of the Annual Meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers - May 11, 1899 and 1900.

BUTLER, Nathan was born on a farm in the Town of Hancock, County of Hancock, State to Maine, Nov. 5, 1831. Came to Minnesota on the Steamer Northern Belle Nov. 10, 1856, and located at St Anthony Falls. Mr. Butler is a graduate of Waterville College of his native state. He is a civil engineer. He has practiced his profession and surveyed for the United States government in most parts of Minnesota. Mr. Butler has lived in Minneapolis many years, surveying and examining land. He examined in detail the entire land grant of the Great Northern Railway Co. He is now living on a farm of 600 acres, adjoining the City of Barnesville, in Clay County, in this state.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BUTTOLPH, F. G. was born at Troy, Oakland county, Michigan, December 6th, 1847. At the age of sixteen, he accompanied his parents to Canada, where he learned his trade, that of dyeing, and engaged in it until 1878, when he came to Minneapolis. In addition to his dyeing works here, he has a hat establishment, in which he renovates silk, felt, and straw hats.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BUXTON, T. J. was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, November 18th, 1833. He moved with his parents, to Union county, Ohio, 1835, where he resided on a farm until twenty-one years of age. He began banking business at Marysville, as cashier, where he continued six years. Mr. Buxton raised Company "E," Sixty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Infantry, and entered the field, in West Virginia, in 1862. He participated in several of the most prominent engagements, being taken prisoner, at Port Republic, and held as such in Salisbury and Libby prisons, for four months. In 1869 he located at Minneapolis and opened the City Bank, in which he has served as cashier since. He has also held the office of city treasurer for four terms. Mr. Buxton was married to Miss Delia A. Griffin, of Delaware county, Ohio. Their children are: Bessie and Marie.

 

Minneapolis Morning Tribune, Monday Dec. 17, 1928

BYBERG, Ole Peterson, passed away on Sunday, aged 81 years.  Survived by wife, Elen, and 3 daughters, Mrs. M. HOLMES, Mrs. G. S. SUSTAD and Dorothy.  Funeral services will be held on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. at Bostrom Undertaking Co., 3008 27th av S.  Interment Hillside cemetery.

Submitted by Jackie Ginn. (Jackie is not related to the above and does not have additional information.)

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 523

BYRNES, James is a native of Ireland. He accompanied his parents to America in 1852, locating on a farm, in Hennepin county Minnesota; he remained with his parents three years, then spent two years in Saint Anthony. At the age of seventeen he learned the blacksmith's trade. Mr. Byrnes was in the south three years, during the war. He came to this city, in 1866, and opened a blacksmith shop. He married Julia F. Sullivan, in 1865, who has been a resident of this state twenty-six years. They have five children, living, and have lost three sons. Mr. Byrne's shop is located at 104 First street south, where he employs three men.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 347

BYRNES, William was a native of Ireland. He emigrated to America in 1849, and lived in Homer, New York, until 1852, when he came here, and the following year made a claim of one hundred and fifty acres. In 1862 he enlisted in the Tenth Minnesota, and served until mustered out in 1865. He died December 1st, 1867. At the time of his death, he was sheriff of Hennepin county. Catherine, his wife, was born in Ireland, March 1827. She came to America in 1848, stayed the first year in New York city, and then removed to Homer. In 1850, she was married to William Byrnes, and two years later they came to Minneapolis. She has had nine children, seven of whom are living: Ellen, Anna, Mary, Teressa, William, Hugh and Lucelia.

 


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