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From the "History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis", published by the North Star Publishing co. 1881

Page 647

UELAND, A. attorney, a native of Norway, was born February 21st, 1853. He attended school in his native country, came to America, June 1871 and attended a course at Barnard's Business college. Located at Minneapolis and read law with Judge R. Reynolds; was admitted to the bar in May 1877. He was married in this city to Miss Anna Ohlhouse in 1879. Their union was brief; she died in March 1880. O. G. Ueland, his father, was a member of the Norwegian Parliament from 1833 till the time of his death, in 1870.

 

From the "History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis", published by the North Star Publishing co. 1881

Page 647

UNSGAARD, John is a native of Norway, born January 14th, 1841. On arriving in the United States, located in Michigan, and dealt in lumber; thence to Minnesota and worked on a farm two years in Goodhue county. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1870, and for three years was in the employ of L. Day and Sons in lumbering, then for four years worked for different boot and shoe firms. March 20th, 1878, he opened the St. James restaurant at 122 Washington Avenue south. He married Anna Hegstad in 1873, who bore him one child, William.

 

From the "History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis", published by the North Star Publishing co. 1881

Page 647

UPHAM, Franklin M. was born at Chelmsford, Massachusetts, in 1846. Received his education at Lowell commercial school. In 1866, went to Arlighton, and engaged in the wholesale meat and provision business; he remained about eleven years, having a very successful trade. He came to Minneapolis in 1878 and purchased a building site on the east side near the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Short Line railway. He returned to his native state and disposed of his property there, on returning, he formed the company of Upham, Wyman and Company, who built a large refining house, and are now doing an extensive business. At the age of twenty-one his sole property consisted of one horse and wagon. His business now amounts to $150,000 annually. Was married to Miss Mary Lawrence, in 1874. They have two children. Laura and Mary.

 

From the "History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis", published by the North Star Publishing co. 1881

Page 647

UPTON, Charles H. of the firm of Lockwood, Upton and Company, was born in Maine, June, 1830. He learned the trade of machinist with P. Muzzy at Bangor, Maine. He worked one year in Boston, and came to Minneapolis in the spring of 1858. A shop was opened under the firm name of Scott and Morgan, which was burned in l862. Went to Montana and remained two years, returning to this city at that time. He was foreman of the St. Anthony Iron Works until 1879, after which he became a member of the present firm. He was married in 1857 to Maria Fenton. Their children are: Horace C., Harvey L., Robert, George and Mabel.

 

From the "History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis", published by the North Star Publishing co. 1881

Page 647

UPTON, R. P. was born at Dixmont, Penobscot County, Maine, December 9th, 1820. Came to St., Anthony in June, 1850, and started a nursery and poultry-yard on Nicollet Island in the spring of 1851; the summer following he opened a grocery on Main street. He conducted the nursery two years, and in 1853 added to his grocery a general variety. The next year he went into partnership with Rollins and Eastman in a flouring mill, under the firm name of Rollins, Upton and Eastman. After three year's existence the firm changed; Upton and Brother owned one half interest in the mill. In 1858, removed to Kingston, Meeker county, and ran a mill four years. During the Indian outbreak he built a stockade, around his mill, and continued to run it. In 1862 he returned to Minneapolis, and the next year took a trip to Nevada, remaining five years, then returned to this city. He was agent for the Millers' Association one year, in the employ of the Northern Pacific railroad six months, then started the Minneapolis Spice Mills in company with T. Ray. In 1872 sold out to Mr. Ray and opened another called the Eureka Mills, and in 1880 moved the works to the Island. Mr. Upton is one of the early pioneers.