Make your own free website on Tripod.com
SURNAME
N

Use the Windows "Find" Feature to locate surnames. (Ctrl & F)

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 602

NAVRATIL, Frank a resident of Minneapolis since 1866, is a native of Bohemia, born October 4th, 1844. He passed his childhood in his native country, where he learned the shoemaker's trade. He came to America, and after working in various cities in this country, he located in this city and worked at his trade until 1871, when he opened his establishment, and has continued as boot and shoemaker since. His wife was formerly Mary Jelinek, of Bohemia, whom he married in 1869. Their children are: Frank, Rosie and Lucy (twins,) George and Eda.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 602

NELSON, Andrew H. of the firm of Malmsten, Nelson and Company, is a native of Sweden, born April 10th, 1849. Coming to America in 1866, he located first at Anoka, Minnesota, remaining there two years, when he came to Minneapolis. He engaged with E. Broad in the manufacture of edged tools, and general blacksmithing. After having learned his trade he traveled through the South, working at several places he visited. In 1872, he returned to this city, and four years later formed a partnership with E. Hernlund, and afterwards taking Mr. Malmsten as a partner in blacksmithing. His marriage with Emma Hernlund occurred in 1875. One daughter has been born to them, Olive R.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 602

NELSON, B. F. a native of Kentucky, was born in 1843. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1864. For a short time he was engaged in rafting lumber, then was employed in a shingle mill, and remained until 1867 at which time he assumed the control of the Butler mill, sawing shingles by the thousand until 1872. He then became a partner of W. C. Stetson. They built the Pacific planing mill, also the St. Louis mill. In 1879 this firm dissolved, Mr. Stetson taking the Pacific and Mr. Nelson the St. Louis mill, which he has had in operation since. He was married in 1869 to Martha Rose, who died in 1874, leaving two sons, William E. and Guy H. His second wife was Miss Fredingburg, whom he married in 1875.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 602

NELSON, THOMAS "Forday". was born in Forday, Norway, June 20th, 1852. He received his education in his native town, where he lived until 1866, then came to America, locating first in Michigan. From there he went on the lakes as a sailor, thence to St. Louis, where he was in the employ of the government. In 1868 he was under General Custer in the New Mexico and Kansas campaign. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1869, and turned his attention to lumbering until 1880, when he was appointed on the police force, where he has continued. Mr. Nelson is a single man.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 603

NESS, H.T. a native of Norway, was born in 1843. He came to this city in 1870, and has since been engaged in the hotel business. He is now proprietor of the Western House, 119 Second street north, owned by Mr. Lawrence, of the law firm of Wilson and Lawrence. Mr. Ness was married in 1871, to Olene Peterson. The have had four children; only one is living, Ida G.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 602

NETTLETON, A. B. editor of the Morning Tribune, was born in Delaware county, Ohio, November 14th, 1838, lived on the parental farm until sixteen years of age, attending the common schools of the neighborhood. In 1855 he accepted employment with a leading mercantile and lumbering firm at Lexington, Michigan. In 1857 he entered Oberlin College, Ohio. While yet at college, on April 14th, 1861, two days after the fall of Fort Sumpter, he enlisted as a private in an Ohio volunteer infantry company, under President Lincoln's first call for 75,000 troops, and was chosen first sergeant. The company was not accepted by the governor of the state, as Ohio's quota was already full. After the battle of Bull Run, in July of 1861, the subject of this sketch again volunteered for army service as a private in Company H of the Second Ohio Cavalry, then organizing at Camp Wade, near Cleveland, Ohio. Was elected first lieutenant of his company, and marched to the front in October, 1861. Served with his regiment in Kansas, Arkansas, Indian Territory, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana (in the latter states during Morgan's raid), Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina. His service was continuous from August, 1861, to June 16th, 1865 two months after the final surrender of the confederate armies, and among the officers under whom he directly served were Blunt, Burnside, H. G. Wright, G. A. Custer, Wilson, Sheridan, Meade and Grant the last year and a half of service, being under the immediate leadership of Custer in Sheridan's famous cavalry corps of the Potomac army. Was present in seventy-three engagements and pitched battles, including among the latter, Grant's campaign of the Wilderness, and Sheridan's brilliant series of victories in the Shenandoah Valley. He was successively promoted to captain, major, lieutenant colonel, and colonel of his regiment, and was brevetted brigadier-general on the recommendation of General Custer, as of date February 25th, 1865, for gallant and meritorious services in the Shenandoah campaign. After being mustered out of the army he studied law for a time at the law school in Albany, New York. In 1866 became editor and part proprietor of the Daily Register at Sandusky, Ohio. In 1868 was a delegate to the national republican convention at Chicago, which nominated Grant and Colfax for president and vice-president. In 1868 removed from Sandusky to Chicago and became publisher of the Advance. In 1870 removed to Philadelphia, and became associated with the banking house of Jay Cooke and Company in their relation as fiscal agents of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company; and also held the position of general agent of the trustees of the Northern Pacific Railroad, in connection with the land interests of that corporation. In 1875, served as general agent of the purchasing committee of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company in reorganizing the corporation. Has served for ten years as a trustee of Oberlin college. In March, 1880, removed to Minneapolis, Minnesota, having purchased a half interest in the Daily Tribune.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 603

NEUDECK, Louis was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 25th, 1821. He was one of the early pioneers of this region, coming to St. Anthony in 1849. He received his education in his native city, and later engaged in the meat business, in which he continued until 1844, when he sold out and removed to Beloit, Wisconsin, remaining one year; thence to Rockford, Illinois, a few months, and next, in 1845, to Stillwater, Minnesota, where he opened a dry goods store, continuing until coming to this city. In 1855 he opened a meat market in St. Anthony, but sold out in 1861. During the Indian troubles of the next year, he assisted in raising and was one of Anson Northrup's company, which went to Fort Ridgely. In 1868, Mr. Neudeck, in company with Captain Fisk, went to Montana, and opened a ranche for the purpose of doing an extensive business in cattle raising. He returned to this city for supplies in 1864, and again started with a wagon train of seven teams. When near Fort Rice, Montana, one of the wagons needing repairing, he, with several men remained in the rear, to perform the task. While here they were attacked by Indians, Mr. Neudeck and several others were murdered. His body was never recovered. The only clue to the sad fate of this unfortunate pioneer was a revolver on which was his name, it being matched from one of the Indians. Six of the wagons with the supplies reached Fort Rice, and were sold, the proceeds being sent to the widow and children in this city. His widow was formerly Catherine Wolff, whom he married in 1848. There are five children living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 604

NEUDECK, Louis W. a life long resident of this city, was born May 3d, 1852, and is a son of Louis Neudeck. It was here that he received his education, and first worked for Glenn and Thompson, and afterwards for E. B. Ames. After a short trip to Duluth, in 1870, he engaged in the meat business in Austin and Red Wing, and returned to Minneapolis in 1879. Immediately after, he bought the meat market of Henry Schulze, where he has since continued. His marriage with Clam Eames, of Red Wing, occurred in 1879. They have one child, Linnie.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


Herman Gustaf Neumann
(Click to enlarge)

NEUMANN, Herman Gustaf was born in Corcoran, MN on Dec.12,1874 son of Christian and his 2nd wife Emilie Wilamena Augusta Mueller from Prussia, Germany. Herman remarried to Marie Krause of Champlin, MN. on 5 Dec.1906.They had 8 children -1.Emma Neumann born 2 Mar.1908, 2. Anna Rose born 4 jun.1909 Md. George G.Krona born 20 Feb.1900,Anna died 4 Apr.1987.,3. Paul born 3 Aug,1910 Md. Blanch _______, had 3 children died 3Sep.1997 at Princeton, MN. , 4.  Arthur born 25 May 1916 Md. Gwen Elizabeth White, Arthur died in 1979 at Princeton, MN. , 5.  Herman Jr, born 18 Oct.1922 died 19 Sep.1978 buried in St. Fridolin Cemetery of New Schwanden. ,6.Henry A. born 18 Oct.1922  died 30 Aug.1927 buried in St. Fridolin Cemetery of New Schwanden Champlin, Hennepin County, MN. , 7. Everett born.24 Feb.1927 died 30 Oct.   1949 buried in St. Fridolin Cemetery of New Schwanden also known as New Schwanden (Swiss) Cemetery, Champlin, Hennepin County, MN. 8.Ernest J. born 24 Feb. 1927 died 18 Apr.1958 at   Blaine, MN. He was married and had 5 children and is buried in the Fort Snelling National Cemetery as He served in the 2nd World War. It was around 1928 when Herman and Marie moved to Princeton, MN. in a large white house. Herman died in Princeton, MN. on 31 Oct.1952 and his wife Marie died in Princeton, MN. on 22 Nov.1963.Both are buried in St. Fridolin Cemetery of New Schwanden  Champlin, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 604

NEWBOM, Angust is a native of Sweden, born December 3d, 1848. He lived on a farm until seventeen years of age, when he commenced his apprenticeship, as a tailor. He emigrated to America in 1872, locating at Joliet, Illinois. Here he was in the employ of a steel rail company five years, then came to Minneapolis. He was with his brother, J. Newbom, who is a tailor, until beginning alone in October, 1880, at 237 Twelfth Avenue south.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 255

NEWELL, E. D. born in Essex county, New York, 1848. Moved with parents to Prescott, Wisconsin and remained until 1877. Came to Minneapolis in May, 1879, and in June of same year moved to Excelsior and established his present millinery and ladies' furnishing store, the first one of the kind in the town. Married in 1871 to Edla D. Cook, of River Falls, Wisconsin. Their two children have passed to the better land.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 604

NEWELL, George E. in company with Messrs. Stevens and Morse, established a wholesale grocery establishment at 9, 11 and 13 Washington Avenue north. At the end of three years Messrs. Stevens and Morse retired. The firm of Newell and Harrison was then formed, which continued until 1879, when Mr. Harrison retired. Since that time Mr. Newell has been alone, doing a successful business.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 604

NEWMAN, E. a native of Norway, was born October 14th, 1845. He learned the trade of moulder in his native country and worked at it until 1863. He then emigrated to America, and the same year located in Minneapolis. He engaged in the pursuit of his trade six years, when he opened a grocery store. In 1873, he, sold, and engaged in other pursuits until 1880, when he started a grocery at his present location, 1318 Fourth street south, which property he owns. He is doing a thriving business. He was married in 1870 to Emma Evensen, of Norway. Four children have been born to them, Emma S., Clara V., Annie E., and Eddie W.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Kenneth Smith. ksmith22@mn.rr.com

NEWMAN, Louise (Mathews), Louise Newman Mathews was born on January 15, 1883, in Menomonie, Dunn County, Wisconsin. She was the only daughter of Frank Albert Newman and Anna Hurth. Louise was baptized as Dorothy Louise, but was always known as Louise. Her brothers were also known by their middle names. This might be a German custom, as their parents were both born in Germany, they lived in a mostly German community and the church they attended kept itís records in German. Her mother died when Louise was only nine years old, and being the only daughter, Louise took over the housekeeping chores, even though she had two older brothers.

By the time her youngest brother was nearly 18, Louise must have felt she needed to take a break from caring for her family, and she came to Minneapolis. She got a job as a cashier, and rented a room at 622 Hennepin. Also living in the same rooming hotel was a well traveled, older man, John Mathews. He had come to Minneapolis around 1901, and was a barber in a downtown shop. Louise and John were married on June 17, 1903, in Minneapolis.

John continued barbering until 1909. During those years John and Louise were living on Nicollet Island and beginning to raise a family. John Jr., Donald and Violet were born on Nicollet Island. In 1909, John began working for the Minneapolis Mill Company, which was to become Northern States Power, as a watchman. The couple then rented a home on Washington Street NE. and their family kept growing. Evelyn, Lloyd, Albert & Muriel were born between 1910 and 1916. Around 1918, John and Louise moved to the near south side of Minneapolis renting homes near Franklin Avenue for a few years. They finally bought a home and settled at 2213-16th Avenue South. Louis, Douglas & Robert were born between 1918 and 1925, completing the Mathews family at ten.

Louise and John celebrated their golden aniversary in 1953, and John died in 1954. Louise continued to live in their home on 16th Avenue until she was near 90. Her oldest son, John, who was also known as "Lefty", lived with her most of the time. When Louise became more fragile, her family moved her to a nursing home in Edina, where she was visited regularly by family members who lived in the Metro area. Louise died on March 15, 1975, and is buried next to her Husband of 51 years at Sunset Memorial Cemetery in St. Anthony. Minnesota.

Information from the personal recollection of her grandson, Kenneth Smith and her daughter Muriel; Dunn County, Wisconsin, vital records; records of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Menomonie, Wisconsin and the Minneapolis City Directory.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 604

NICHOLS, G. H. was born at Braintree, Vermont, May 18th, 1823. He went to Randolph, Vermont, in 1833, and in 1843, learned the building of pipe organs. Three years later, he removed to Bridgewater, Massachusetts, and engaged with C. H. Packard, who was the originator of the reed organ, from which all reed organs from that day to this have sprung. After remaining six months, he returned to his native state and commenced the manufacture of melodeons and organs. The next year he removed to Braintree, Massachusetts, continuing in the same business; he remained there until 1848, when poor health compelled him to change. He traveled through Vermont until 1856, when he came west and located at Prescott, Wisconsin. In 1862, he enlisted in the Second Wisconsin Cavalry, but was discharged after serving seven months, on account of failing health. In 1869, he began the manufacture of cabinet organs, and has since continued. He opened his salesroom in Minneapolis, July, 1879, and removed his works here in the fall of 1880. His factory is located on Second Avenue south-east, comer of Prince street.

 

NIEMANN, Christian (also spelled Neumann) The waves of the mighty Atlantic splashed on the sides of the ship sailing from Germany to America.  On this ship was a strong, robust German, is wife, Louisa and family.  Mr. Niemann was born in 1830 in Prussia and left his job as kutcher, chauffeur and keeper of the horses, for a wealthy man in Germany and pressed forward to make a new home for his family in the "New World."   A long tiresome, and sad journey it was, as daughter Mary’s twin passed away on the ship and was buried at sea.  But look  - America at last.  See the virgin timber, un-tilled soil, land of Freedom!   The three continued traveling on land until they reached Minnesota.  A small farm in Corcoran Township caught their eye and they purchased the 80 acres for $350 from Herman Schaefer in January 1864.  This was a large sum of money as now three more children, William, Christian and Charley had been added to the family.  How would they eve pay for their home?  The Civil War was raging and many rich sons would pay someone to go and fight in their place.  Christian Niemann volunteered and was placed in Co. 1 of the 11th Minnesota Regiment and when he returned unharmed, his home was paid and the deed was filed in January, 1969.   Another daughter, Bertha, made her debut at the Niemann Heim and everyone was happy until one day Grandma’s wife, Louisa, passed away, leaving him to care for a family of five.   Augusta Miller’s mother had died in childbirth when her brother, Herman, was born.  She was raised by her grandparents who owned a flour mill in Germany.  Her only brother lived in Germany, but she longed to go to America.  Little did she know that at the tender age of 19, she would meet a man from Deutschland in Minnesota and marry him.  Yes, Augusta Miller and Christian Neumann were married in 1871.  She moved into his two-room log house and twelve children blessed this union - the first four were twins.  One child died in infancy and two twins passed away because of the dreadful disease diphtheria.   Grandma had a terrible time trying to keep Herman and his twin from crawling under the bed in the two-room log home.  She solved the problem by tying a string to their leg.  When they crawled under the bed, she would pull on the string and out they came.  A larger six room frame house was built on the farm and August was the first child to be born in it.   Nine healthy Neumanns:  Herman, August, Martha, Albert, Emilie, Otto, Henry, Edward, and Rose, scraped and loved each other.  Grandpa passed away from cancer in the Spring of 1899, and Grandma stayed on the farm with August keeping the home fires burning for the family.  Later Grandma moved to Minneapolis and left Albert on the homestead farming.   Ferdinand Steinert, bartender in a saloon at Crystal Lake, wooed Grandma and in October 1901 they were married.  Together they bought a saloon between Corcoran and Wood Lake.  Grandma’s new husband didn’t want vivacious seven year-old Rose around, so she stayed with her married sister, Martha.  In the winter of1903, Steinert went into the woods to see how the woodchoppers were working.  The air was filled with sounds of axes.  Suddenly Stienert accidentally chopped his foot and nine days later he passed away due to blood poisoning.   In 1905, Grandma married Richard Rehm, a foreman at Wilcox Sash and Door Co. who had three children, Annie, Tillie and Joe who were about Rose’s age.  Now she had someone to play with.  About this time, she- Rose - attended the German Lutheran School at 18th Ave. North and 6th St. and learned to read, write and speak German fluently.   Rose grew to womanhood in Minneapolis and at age 16 on her way to Emil Ziemer’s wedding with her brother Ed. and future sister-in-law, Ida Ziemer, she met Charley Ziemer at the Baptist Church corner in St. Bonaficius.  Charley’s father, Ernest, was born April 16, 1862, and his mother, Johnna Biersdorf, was born Janurary 14, 1854.  They raised their family of eight, Ida, Emil, Charley, Elsie, Henry, Ernest, and John in a log house on a farm West of St. Bonficius.  One cold Spring night, Mother Hen softened Grandma’s heart and spent the night in the house with her little chicks.  In the middle of the night, the hen woke Grandma and she found the house in flames.  She and Grandpa tossed belongings and children out of the window one by one.  Thanks to the chicken fire alarm, everyone was saved and grew to maturity as the years went by.   Charley and Emil were farming on a farm near St. Bonaficius when Rose met Charley at the church corner that cold December day.  Grandma Ziemer passed away in 1914, and on August 11, 1915, Rose and Charley exchanged their vows before Rev. Nachtsheim at the parsonage at 6th & 18th Avenue North in Minneapolis.  The bride was beautiful in her long, flowing white China silk wedding dress and long veil.  On her right stood Prince Charming  in his dark blue suit.  Tillie Rehm, in her floor length light blue dress and Ernest Ziemer witnessed  the ceremony along with stepfather Rehm, Grandpa Ziemer and sister Martha.  Tears streamed down stepfather Rehm’s face as the "I Do’s" were spoken.   After the wedding, a hack was rented to take the bridal party to Grandpa Rehm’s house for dinner.  Other attending the wedding walked the four blocks. The bride slipped away from the party and put on her navy blue going-away suit with floor length skirt and her poke bonnet.  At 5 p.m. the newlyweds,  Martha, Tillie, Ernest and Grandpa Ziemer boarded the "Loose Line" Choo Choo to Lyndale, Minnesota where John Ziemer met them and took everyone to Thorson’s farm.  Charley’s two bay horses, Maggie and Dandy, stepped sprightly down the road hauling the passengers to the farm.  Various aromas of "goodies" poured from the farmhouse.  Aunt Ida, Aunt Mary and Aunt Annie had unpacked the bride’s dishes, set the table beautifully and prepared a "mouth watering" supper for all.  The following day the guests returned home.   The honeymoon was now over and the work began.  Dad had Thorson’s 160 acre farm rented for $450 cash and two large loads of hay for a year.  In August 1916, he decided to buy a home of his own.  He contacted a real estate agent in Maple Plain and was referred to Bill France  in Frederic, Wisconsin from whom he bought the 62 acre farm on Little Trade Lake for $5,500.00.   On December 20, an early Christmas present arrived; namely, Leona Augusta Johanna.  The 8 lb. bundle of joy arrived Wednesday about 8:30 p.m.  Dr. Helgren from Watertown came in the morning and stayed until Leona made her appearance.  Rose Schuster cared for the new mother and daughter.   Moving week in March 1917 was quite an experience.  Everything:  cattle, horses, machinery and household goods were shipped to Fredric by boxcar.  Dad milked "Old Yellow" on the train and treated the crew to "Jersey Highballs."  The trip from Lyndale to Fredrick took one week.  Snow drifts were high, the air was cold and the sun shone brightly that March 15.  Dad transferred the goods from the boxcar to his bobsled and on to Trade Lake they went.  Queeny and Susy, the two roan horses, stepped amiss and over went the bobsled throwing Mom, baby Leona and sewing machine into a snowdrift.   Everything moved, the Ziemer’s were all settled in their new home.  Oh, Oh, the stock arrived again.  It was a Sunday, February 17, 1918 about 9:30 a.m. when Charles Ernest Christian was born.  He was 8-1/2 lbs. of happiness.  Dr. Diamond chugged his way from Fredric to Trade Lake in his new Ford for the delivery and a neighbor, Mrs. Isaacson was the midwife.  The following year on Friday, November 21, 1919, at 10:30 a.m. a 9 lb. boy arrived at the Ziemer residence.  Ervin Arnold with his dark brown hair and dark flashing eyes won his way into everyone’s heart.  This time Dr. Arveson come from Fredric to perform his duties and Aunt Emma assisted.   Two boys and a girl - what a happy family lived on "Ziemer’s Hill."  Leona always looked after her brother Charles and Ervin would entertain everyone at dinner wiggling his ears. Grandpa Ziemer, in the meantime, wooed a widow in Osseo, MN and Ackmann and Ernest Ziemer were married.  
In 1925, the family planned to take a vacation and go on a trip West.  The home farm was rented to Frank Larson on a half share basis and Mom and Dad moved into the house on their 10 acres near Four Corners.   Suddenly the clouds darkened and sadness come when Grandpa Rehm passed away April 30, 1925.  On Sunday, June 28, Ervin was playing with an inner tube with a group of children.  Pop, the tube burst and the valve stem flew into Ervin’s eye.  He was rushed to the hospital and on Monday his eye was removed.  The following Friday, the doctors noticed scarlet fever symptoms and on July 5, Ervin passed away.   Charles also contacted the disease and became so frail he had to sit on a pillow.  The family was quarantined from July t to September 7.   "Wonderful Wisconsin" wound its way into Grandma Rehm’s heart and on Sept. 7, 1925, she decided to make her home with Mom and Dad.  Grandma spoke only Erman but did know three words in English.  When a salesman came to the door, she very timidly would say "No speak English"."  Three magic words that sent the salesman  on his way everytime.   Their trip never materialized so in the Spring of 1926, they moved back to their home on Trade Lake.  It was decided in 1927 to build a new barn - a round roof basement barn, 60 feet long, 30 feet wide with room for 17 cows, calves and Dad’s prize possessions, his horses.   This project cost $3,000.00.   Everything seemed brighter until March 4, 1932, when Grandpa Rehm passed away from heart trouble.  Settling the estate was a nightmare as Mom was in and out of courtrooms with sister’s and brothers.   Leona, however, had a secret to tell friend Della Gerber at the school picnic.  She was going to have a baby brother or sister soon.  Aunt Mary Neumann arrived from Minnesota on August 3.  She and Mom picked choke cherries.  Up and down the banks they climbed, filling their pails with the little red berries.  The following day, Dr. Lindberg from Grantsbery was called.   Della had kept the secret safely and on Tuesday, August 4, 1932, at about 4 p.m., Audrey Delores gave her first cry.

Written by Delores Ziemer - September 13, 1964
Granddaughter of Christian Neumann and daughter of Rose (Neumann) Ziemer:  Rose’s parent’s - Christian Neumann and Augusta Miller. Note:  Retyped by Alvin G. Ebert (
ALEBERT@AOL.COM) on 11/15/00 for posting on the Neumann  Family Website.  This original document was passed to me by Bernadine Ernster.  I am also a Great-grandson of Christian Neumann, my mother being Lillian Ann (Neuman) Ebert, the second daughter of Christian Neumann, Jr. who was the 4th son the Christian Neumann, Sr. & Louisa Wulkow.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 604

NIND, J. Newton city editor of the "Tribune," was born in St. Charles, Illinois in March, 1854, and is of English descent, his parents, James G. and Mary C. Nind, having removed to this country from England in 1849. His home continued at his birth-place until 1866, when he removed with his parents to Winona, Minnesota, where he won after imbibed a love for journalism while engaged as carrier on the "Republican" of that city. While so engaged, he, with four other boys, each with a cash capital of seven dollars, launched, on the 13th of February, 1869, the first copy of the "North Star," a three-column semi-monthly. At the end of the first six months Mr. Nind became the manager of the paper, and enlarged it to five columns, in which form he conducted it until August 17th, 1870. During the ensuing year he improved himself in the art of printing. In December, 1871, at Red Wing, he renewed the "North Star" as a weekly publication, which he edited, printed and published as a means of prosecuting studies at the Red Wing Institute. In December, 1872, he relinquished its management to accept a position as reporter on the St. Paul "Pioneer," and has since served at different times as reporter on the following papers: the St. Paul "Pioneer." Minne- apolis "Times" St. Paul "Press," Minneapolis "Mail," the "Pioneer Press," and has filled the position of city editor of the Minneapolis "Tribune" since September, 1877. He was married in December, 1879, to Agnes C. Williams of Red Wing.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 605

NOBLE, William C. was born at Johnsburgh, New York, December 9th, 1840. He worked on a farm until the fall of 1862, then went into the store of B. Thomas, as salesman, and two years later became a member of the firm. In 1865 he sold his interest and came to St. Anthony the spring of the next year. A few months after his arrival he was employed by O. T. Swett in a general merchandise store as book-keeper; here he remained until 1876, when in company with J. H. McHerron, purchased the grocery department of Mr. Swett's store. At the death of Mr. McHerron, in 1878, Mr. S. Armstrong bought his interest and the firm is now known as Noble and Armstrong, 22 University Avenue south-east.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 605

NOEL, J. P. a native of Germany, was born in in 1845. He came to the United States in 1870, locating at Minneapolis. For three years he drove a beer wagon, since which time he has kept saloon at 701 Washington Avenue south. He married Augusta Engle in November, 1873. They have one child, George A. W.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 605

NOERENBERG, August J. a native of Prussia, was born in 1853. He came to the United States in 1860, locating at St. Paul, giving his attention to hotel keeping. In 1875 he came to this city and started a brewery, in which he continued until 1879, when he opened a saloon at 1728 Seventh street south. He married Dora M. Blohn, March 3d, 1879. They have one child, August C.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 605

NOERENBERG, F. D. is a native of Prussia, born in 1845. At the age of fifteen he came to America and located at St. Paul. He kept hotel in that city until 1870. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1875, and in 1880 took possession of the city brewery and is now engaged in the manufacture of beer. He was married in 1868 to Miss Caroline Richmond, who died in 1875. After remaining a widower three years he married Johanna Sprunkmann, who has borne him three children.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 605

NOLAN, James was born at Quebec, Canada, July 10th, 1847. At ten years of age he accompanied his parents to. St. Paul, where he lived until 1861. He then enlisted in the Fifth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry and served four years. The following are some of the engagements in which he participated Siege of Corinth, Vicksburg, Richmond, and battle of Nashville; also many skirmishes. From 1871-1872 he was on the police force at St. Paul; he was also detective on the St. Paul and Duluth railroad one year. He was appointed on the police force in this city in 1878, where he has since remained. He was married in 1878, to Annie E. Dickson. They have three children: William, Mary and Edward J.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co

Page 321

NOONAN, David a native of Ireland, was born in 1820. He lived there thirty years, and came to America in 1850. He went to Philadelphia, where he remained six years, then removed to Iowa for one year, and in 1857 came to Corcoran, where he has since resided. Married in 1863 to Margaret Hayes. They have one daughter.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co

Page 605

NORACON, L. C. was born at Menasha, Wisconsin, November 7th, 1854. He located in Minneapolis in 1875, and worked in the "A" mill eighteen months, then in the old Humboldt, nine months. On the completion of the new Humboldt he was employed until 1880, and has since been machine man in the Cataract mill. He married Miss Ada Cook, April 22d, 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co

Page 605

NORMAN, John born November 27th, 1846, is a native of Sweden. He was a farmer and grain buyer, previous to his coming to America in 1868. He came direct to Minneapolis, where he was employed as laborer in a brick yard. In 1872 he returned to his native country, and in April married Mrs. Carrie Swansen, and with his bride returned to this city. In 1879 he was appointed on the police force, which position he has since held. Two children have been born to them: Alice A. and Frank T.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 291

NORRIS, J. W. born in Lincoln county, Maine, April 20th, 1840. Made that his home until 1855, then followed the sea until 1861, and came with the family the same year to Hennepin county. August 1864, enlisted in Company F, Eleventh Minnesota Infantry, and served until honorably discharged at Fort Snelling in 1865, when he settled on the farm he now owns. Married in November 1869, to Seleda Longfellow. They have four children: James A., Alice R., Jacob L. and Mary F.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 291

NORRIS, Robert W. born in Lincoln county, Maine, May 23, 1848. He lived there until seven years of age. His father, Captain Joseph Norris, being a sea captain, he went on the ocean with him for six years. The family came to Hennepin county in 1861. Robert, married Lizzie Longfollow, February 8th, 1855. They have three children, William F., Daniel W. and Robert W.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 605

NORRIS, W. H. was born at Hallowell, Maine, July 24th, 1832. He prepared for college, at Dwight's High School, Brooklyn, New York, went through a full collegiate course at Yale College and graduated in 1854. He attended Dane law School at Harvard College. In 1856 he removed to Green Bay, Wisconsin, and completed his law studies at the office of James H. Howe, afterward attorney general of Wisconsini and was admitted to the bar in October 1857, and continued with J. H. Howe until 1862. He then practiced alone until 1870, and for eight years had a young partner. In 1879 he formed a partnership with E. H. Ellis, who was judge of the Tenth circuit of Wisconsin, which continued until 1880, when he removed to Minneapolis and located his office at 239 Nicollet Avenue. His favorite line of practice has been commercial, insurance and railroad law.. His marriage with Miss Hannah B: Harriman occurred at Green Bay, in 1859. They leave three children: Louise, Georgia and Harriman. Mr. Norris' library is large and complete, probably the finest in the city.

 

From "Minneapolis Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voyaguer Press 1890. (See Anson Northrup below)

NORTHRUP, Anson Anson Northrup's name is linked with the early history of a number of communities in the Northwest. He did not believe in pinning his affections to any one locality. Minneapolis was favored with longer jojourns than most. Wherever he was he was busy on some project. After building a hotel in St. Paul he came here, in 1850, built the St. Charles hotel and ran it for two years. He was the buiilder of the old Bushnell house on the west side. He enlisted for his country's defence and did valiant service in the Indian campaign. He came to Minnesota from his native state, New York, in 1839, at the age of twenty-two.

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co. (See also Anson Northrup above)

Page 606

NORTHRUP, Anson one of the most noteworthy characters in the roll of pioneers, was born in Connewango, New York, January 8d, 1817, where he lived with his father till the spring of 1839, when he moved to Morgan county, Illinois. In October following, he left for the northern wilds, with a drove of twenty oxen for the Falls of the St. Croix, and twenty for Allen's camp, then just opened at the present site of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Two men were sent to help him drive to Allen's camp, which was reached the latter part of November. There was but one house between Prairie du Chien and the Falls, a rude cabin occupied by one Reid, at Trempealeau Bluff. Arriving at this point, they found Reid was absent on a trip to Galena, for supplies, and his wife (a squaw) entirely out of provisions. Several "Mackinaw" boats, laden with supplies for Allen's camp, were on the way up, and thinking to fall in with them the next day, they left nearly all their provision at Reid's; but the boats had pushed through with all possible dispatch, in fear of being frozen in, and their generosity cost them a four day's fast in the then barren wilds of the Chippewa Valley. Finally, when almost worn out with hunger and fatigue, they reached Allen's camp, about midnight, but their anticipated feast was prevented by the stern refusal of Allen's squaw to give them more than a cup of tea until next morning. Mr. Northrup remained at Allen's camp about three weeks, before he could get a guide to help him through to the Falls, owing to hostilities then existing between the Sioux and Chippewa Indians, which rendered travel anything but agreeable. Finally, however, he secured the services of a guide, and made the journey in safety, arriving just before Christmas. This was the first drove of oxen ever, brought to the northern wilds, and their owners the first lumbermen in that region. Returning in the spring of 1840 to Illinois he made preparations to go north, and the next year, 1841, took boat at St. Louis and reached the Falls of the St. Croix in May, three weeks from the time of leaving St. Louis. There were no settlements above Prairie du Chien. When more fuel was needed for the boat, she was tied up, while the deck hands went ashore out and "toted" enough wood for another "run." The boat was the "Indian Queen," built to run on the Missouri, and never made a second trip to this region. In May, 1844, he moved to what is now Stillwater, and built a hotel, the first house in the place. He also bought 160 acres of land which now embraces about one-half the site of that vigorous young city.

In 1849, he sold his interest there and built the American House at St. Paul, the first all frame building in the place. The rough lumber for this building was brought from the mills at St. Croix Falls, and the flooring, siding, sash, doors, etc., from St. Louis. The American was formally opened to the public July 4th, 1850, and soon thereafter sold, after which Mr. Northrup came to St. Anthony and commenced the erection of the St. Charles Hotel, a little above the present site of Clark's mills. This was the second all frame building here, the first being a hasty constructed house built and occupied by Mr. Northrup while the St. Charles was in course of completion. The hotel was opened July 4th, 1851, the same day the steamer "Gov. Ramsey" made her first run up the river, under command of Captain John Rollins. After running the St. Charles two years, he rented it, and engaged in other pursuits. In 1858, he visited the Pacific coast, returning after an absence of four months, and bought the old steamer "Governor Ramsey," which he took up the river as far as Grand Rapids (taking it over the falls at Sauk Rapids by means of windlasses and other necessary appliances), then back to Crow Wing, where he took the machinery out, and took the boat apart above the bull. February 16th, 1859 he left St. Paul with forty teams and a crew of men, proceeded to Crow Wing, loaded the boat and machinery, and started for the Red river, cutting roads through the timbered portion of the routs, and reaching the river about eight miles below the present site of Fargo, April 8th. They had not the protection of even a tent, yet the men were all in good health and spirits, notwithstanding it was severe weather, and the snow two feet deep when they arrived at their destination. Early in the season he built the boat, run it to Lake Winnipeg, then back to Georgetown, where it was sold, and has since done good service on the Red River of the North.

At the breaking out of the rebellion, Mr. Northrup entered the army, receiving the appointment of wagon master in the First Regiment Minnesota Volunteers. In September, 1861, he was appointed wagon master in General Gorman's brigade; in March, 1862, to alike position in General Sedgewick's division, and in June following was put in charge of the trains of Sumner's corps, Army of the Potomac, where he remained until the memorable Indian massacre in August, 1862, when he obtained leave of absence, and has tened home to aid in protecting the home borders. The day following his arrival in Minneapolis, he obtained a captain's commission from Governor Ramsey, with instructions to raise a company of mounted men, and proceed with all haste to the relief of Fort Ridgely, which was then besieged by the murderous savages. As indicative of the "spirit of the trees," and the confidence reposed in Captain Northrup by his townsmen, it is only necessary to state that on the same day he received his commission, he raised a company of ninety-six men, and at nine o'clock that evening had marched them to Shakopee, twenty-five miles from Minneapolis, on the way to Fort Ridgely, The entire march was made in three days, and with a company now augmented to 140 men, he reached the beleagured fortress just at daylight, having marched all night.

It is but simple justice to state here that Captain Northrup was the first to relieve the distressed inmates of the fortress. Others, with less modesty, and as surely with less honesty, have claimed the laurels due only, to this old patriot, who never courted even a passing compliment for his timely services.

Since the close of the war, Capt. Northrup's life has been marked by the same spirit of change and adventure that characterized his previous years. For two years he kept the First National Hotel, five years was spent at Duluth, mainly in contracting and jobbing for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, and in 1874, leaving Duluth, he came to St. Paul, then took a short trip to Texas, from whence he returned to St. Paul, and remained until May, 1880, when he removed to Fort Snelling and opened a boarding-house. Mr. Northrup put up the first brick building in Minneapolis, now known as the Bushnell House, on Fourth street, near the court-house. It is impossible to here enumerate all the noteworthy incidents connected with the career of this veteran pioneer, whose life is remarkable for its restless, energetic character, and ever varying hues. Anson Northrup married Miss Betsey Jane Edwards, August 23d, 1838 at Waterbury, N. Y., by whom he has had ten children, six of whom are now living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 606

NOTT, W. S. of the firm of E. B. Preston and Company, is a native of Dublin, Ireland, born in July, l852. His parents were English, with whom became to America in 1855, locating at New York, where he received his education. He then removed to Chicago, remaining until January, 1880, when he came to this city as a member of the firm of E. B. Preston and Company, and opened business in the sale of leather and rubber belting and rubber goods of all kinds. Located at 203 Nicollet Avenue.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 607

NUDD, W. H. was born at Wakefield, New Hampshire, July l6th, 1831. He came to Minneapolis in 1857 and was in a bakery seven years, then engaged in farming in St. Anthony. In 1870 he entered the firm of which he is now the head. The firm name is Nudd and Knight, and they manufacture wood eave troughs, etc., on Main street, south-east. He married Miss Laura Shepherd of Bangor, Maine, in 1859. Their children are: Lottie S., Henry A., Benjamin F., and Edwin F.

 

From the Minneapolis Morning Tribune, Monday Dec. 17, 1928

NYBECK, Anna - Residence 2107 Menneapolis av, passed away Saturday, aged 79 years.  Survived by husband, 3 daughters, 1 son.  Services Tuesday at 2 o'clock from Rierside chapel, corner of 20th and Riverside. Interment Crystal Lake.  Walter A. Anderson Co., 1825 Riverside ave, in charge.

Submitted by Jackie Ginn. (Jackie is not related to the above and does not have additional information.) 

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881, North Star Publishing Co.

Page 607

NYBERG, W. of the firm of Lockwood, Upton and Company, is a native of Sweden, born May 2d, 1852. He came to America with his parents in 1858, and received his education in the schools of this city. In 1869 he apprenticed in the St. Anthony Iron Works and after finishing his trade remained until its destruction by fire in April, 1879. In June, following, he formed a partnership with Mr. Upton in the Union Iron Works, afterwards taking Mr. Lockwood, which formed the present firm. Mr. Nyberg is unmarried.