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History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 348

GAFFNEY, Thomas a native of Ireland, was born in 1826. When two years old he came with his parents to America, and lived on a farm in Aroostook county, Maine, until eighteen years of age, when he commenced lumbering on the Penobscot river. In 1854, he removed to Saint Anthony, and for eight winters worked in the pineries; in 1857, he secured the claim where he now lives and built his present residence in 1880. August 18th, 1862, he enlisted and went to Fort Ridgely; the following summer he went with the expedition against the Indians, across the plains, and in the fall of 1863 went to St. Louis, where he was engaged in guard duty during the winter and in the spring went into active service, participating in all the battles of his regiment. He was honorably discharged in August, 1865. In April, 1857, he married Ellen Buckley. They have six children.

 

Research and History of the Gagne Family written by Sister Renee La Belle. Granddaughter of Francois & Caroline (Dion) Gagne, and submitted by Claudia Schuman.

GAGNE, FRANCOIS (Frank) was born January 30, 1822 at St. Henri near Quebec, Canada. On July 28, 1846 he married Caroline Dion in the same house in which she had been born eighteen years earlier. By 1854, Francois and Caroline decided to leave Canada and with their three children, Remiel, Delima and George, came to Minnesota.

Exactly what led the Gagnes to leave their home and find a new one in the Minnesota territory is not known. Presumably, they came in search of a better life for themselves and their children, and though it is only speculation, it seems that the adventure of such a trip must have appealed to them as it had to their ancestors. It is likely that they had heard stories of Minnesota, either directly or indirectly, from the many French-Canadian voyageurs and trappers who had long been part of the Minnesota scene, and who traveled home to Canada with stories of this new area to the west. No doubt they had heard that good land in the Minnesota Territory was opening up for settlement, for by 1853 treaties with the Indians had been signed, and the territory seemed ripe for settling. They probably heard news of the "Great Railroad Excursion" of 1854, very important to the settling of Minnesota. In that year the track of the Chicago and Rock Island Railroad was completed to Rock Island, Illinois on the east bank of the Mississippi. To celebrate, on June 9, a group of very influential easterners, including many newspaper editors, traveled from Chicago to Rock Island by train and up the Mississippi by steamboat, arriving at the St. Paul levee in just thirty hours. They were very impressed with their journey and with the territory, and when they reached home, began to tell people about it.

Oral tradition has it that the Gagne family came that same year by boat from Quebec along the St. Lawrence River, through the Great Lakes to Chicago; and then by train to Rock Island and by boat up the Mississippi to St. Paul, just as that famous group had on June 9.

It seems that when they first arrived in this area, Francois and Caroline stayed on Nicollet Island and probably remained there that first winter, along with other French speaking settlers, some of whom they may even have known previously. At that time, the Island was mostly forest and Minneapolis was still very small --just beginning to grow. There was a slight wait to get the acreage they undoubtedly came for; the land was not actually offered for sale until 1855. But many people, and probably the Gagnes too, actually went to live on the land they had chosen, and exercised "squatters rights" even before they could purchase the land officially. When the land was finally opened up for sale, large numbers of new immigrants arrived to claim it, and the whole territory grew rapidly.

In the Hennepin County Record Book of Deeds, it is listed that on January 19, 1856, Francois Gagne first officially acquired land in the Minnesota Territory. It was his homestead plot; 80 acres free from the United States Government in return for a promise that he would work the land and pay taxes on it. This plot was located on the east side of Lake of The Isles, and is bordered today by Hennepin and Lyndale Avenues and West 28th and Lake Streets.

During this time, the Minnesota Territory was experiencing a "Boom" and nearly everyone was invloved in land speculation. It appears that Francois himself profited from the sky-rocketing of land prices; The land which he had gotten free from the United States Government was sold by him for $210.00 -- and it appears that he may even have sold it before he had the official title in his hands. It wasn't pure speculation on Francois' part, however, that made him sell this land. He was looking for good land for farming and trapping, for he had a family to feed and care for. On April 3, 1856, Francois paid $100.00 to a Mr. Richardson for 40 acres of land, this time located east of Lakes Calhoun and Harriet. Today it's boundaries are approximately 42nd and 46th Streets and Chicago and 12th Avenues.

Francois soon became discouraged with the area near the lakes. Not only was the land sandy and not good for farming, but as the city grew in that direction, the game became scarce and trapping was not good. There is a story which claims that Francois came to feel that this land was so useless that he traded it for a hunting dog! At any rate, the family moved on and out of the city of Minneapolis.

In an attempt to find better land, on April 21, 1856, "Francis", (as his name now appears in the record books) purchased 160 acres of land in the town of Corcoran from Joseph Lascombe for $800.00, and on July 1 of the same year, he bought 80 acres from Anthony Lonchard in today's Golden Valley for $900.00. Today this latter purchase is bordered approximately by Highway #55 and Boone, Western, and Winnetka Avenues, and makes up the Western half of the Brookview Country Club in Golden Valley. On July 9, and July 30th, and September 13, 1856, and December 22, 1857, Francois added to his acreage in Corcoran, and this is where the family really settled in and remained for many years to come.

As so often happens, after a "boom" came a "bust". The panic of 1857 in Minnesota was caused initially by the failure of the Ohio Life Insurance and Trust Company of New York. Creditors called their loans, everyone was in debt, and the territory was literally emptied of money,. City lots became virtually valueless and thousands of people who had found themselves wealthy, soon found they were in actual bodily need. The Gagne's could congratulate themselves on their move, their family would survive these bad times and grow in Corcoran.

Trapping was excellent in Corcoran since there were small ponds and plenty of wilderness there. Farming was not quite as easy however, since the land was originally covered by a forest of maple trees and had to be cleared before any planting could take place. However, Francois and Caroline eventually had ten children in all; and with everyone helping out, they managed to make a good living there. The timber brought contact with the lumber companies and many family members eventually came under their employ there, and in other parts of Minnesota, especially during the winter months. Most of the Gagne men possessed a good knowledge of French cooking and occasionally went north to cook for the lumber camps during the winter. The women of the family were excellent seamstresses, and their skill was much in demand in the area.

During the Civil War years, Francois wished to avoid serving in the army, and managed to escape the officers who came to his home to find him. The story goes that he leaped from an upstairs window of the family home and fled to Canada. He returned rarely until the war was over, and then lived on until 1886. Caroline finished raising the family herself and lived until 1914, becoming blind in her last years. (see obituary for Caroline Gagne below). Both are buried in the French cemetery in Corcoran.

The Corcoran land was originally in Francois and Caroline's name, but it then went to Remeil, their eldest son, who saw to it that it was divided among the five brothers. The log house, which the Gagne's built upon their arrival in Corcoran, still stands today, with some alterations. It now belongs to the Watkins family.

Francois and Caroline (Dion) were the parents of 10 children as follows;

Remial Gagne, born July 14, 1848, married Lenore Billodeau and died March 1, 1895.
Delima Rose Gagne, born may 12, 1850, married Joseph Primeau, and died July 8, 1931.
George Gagne, born June 13, 1852, married Adele Bilodeau, and died April 12, 1916
Mary Gagne, born July 24, 1856, married Frank Cloutier, and died March 31, 1941.
Peter Gagne, born July 22, 1858, married Laura Lauzon, and died Jan 25, 1944.
David Gagne, born Sept 22, 1860, married Emilie Laurent, and died Nov 8, 1927.
Adele Gagne, born Sept 20, 1861, married Louis Bilodeau, and died Oct 4, 1897.
Louis Gagne, born Oct 22, 1864, married Jean Hennessey, and died Dec 24, 1923.
Emma Gagne, born Jan 14, 1871, married Auguste La Belle, and died June 5, 1946.
Zoe Gagne, born Jan 12, 1873, married John Belair, and died August 31, 1847.

Obituary from Minneapolis Journal, Sunday May 14, 1914
Submitted by great-great granddaughter, Claudia Schuman
schumanC@comcast.net

GAGNE, Mrs. Caroline Gagne ( nee DION) In the passing of Mrs. Caroline Gagne, 84 years old, who died a few days ago at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Joseph Primeau, 822 Ramsey Street NE, Minnesota lost one of its earliest settlers. She came here before Minneapolis existed and when there was only one house in St. Anthony.

Mrs. Gagne arrived in St. Anthony in 1854 from Quebec, where she was born January 12, 1830, to join her husband, who had come two years before. For a year they made their home on the East Side and then moved to a farm near Lake Calhoun. After two years Mr. Gagne felt that life on the quiet shores of Calhoun was not primitive enough. He had acquired a taste for maple sugar and decided to delve into the wilderness where he could tap the trees for himself.

Cut Path Through Woods.
With a friend, he literally hewed his way through the woods to what is now the town of Corcoran, where he staked out his claim and made his home. This maples were plentiful and to this day the old Gagne homestead has the finest grove of royal maples in the state. On this farm Mr. and Mrs. Gagne lived until 1886, when Mr. Gagne died, and the farm went to one of the sons, George, who with his family, is still living on it. The couple had eleven children, eight of whom are living, sixty-six grandchildren, eight of whom have died, and sixty-four great-grandchildren, of whom fifty-five are living, or a total of 121 living descendants.

Hid Children From Indians.
Mrs. Gagne often told of the hardships she and her husband had to undergo in the pioneer days, when the woods were full of Indians and wild beasts. She related stories of the raids made by the savages which caused her to hide her children in the cellar and keep them under cover for days.

The funeral services were held at Notre Dame de Lourdes church on the East Side, and the interment was at Corcoran. The surviving children are, Mrs. Joseph Primeau, 822 Ramsey Street NE., Mrs. Frank Cloutier, 512 Fifth Street NE; Mrs. John Belair, 724 Adams Street NE., Mrs. E. La Belle, Glendive, MT., David Gagne, Glendive, MT., who formerly was proprietor of the French hotel on Nicollet avenue; George, Peter and Louis Gagne, all of Corcoran.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 549

GALE, Harlow A. was born in Worcester county, Massachusetts. When three years of age his father died, and he lived with an uncle in Vermont, Rev. Samuel Goddard, until 1846, when returned to his mother. In 1852 he went to Massachusetts, and engaged in teaching and studying until 1856, when he graduated from Union College, Now York. The same year he came to this city, and engaged in the real estate business. In 1858 he was appointed deputy clerk of the district court for Hennepin county, and in 1859 was appointed county auditor. Was subsequently elected for two terms, and in 1865 declined a third nomination. He bought out the insurance agency of W. B. Cornell, and with S. C. Gale organized the real estate and insurance agency of Gale and Company. In 1872 he bought and platted Gale's first addition to Minneapolis, and in 1873 the second. It was he who conceived and executed the idea of the present city market, a description of which may be found elsewhere. Mr. Gale was married in 1859, to Libbie Griggs, who has home him four children: Harlow, Robert, Willie and Isabel.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co. (Also see S. C. Gale below)

Page 549

GALE, S. C. was born September 15th, 1827, at Royalston, Massachusetts. Was apprenticed to learn the tanner's trade until 17 years of age, when he commenced preparation for college. He studied at the academies of New Salem, Shelburne Falls, and West Brattleboro, Vermont, and finally Yale College, where he graduated in 1854, after which he attended Harvard law school one year and taught school two years, continuing to read law in the meantime. In 1857 he came to Minneapolis, and the autumn of the same year he was admitted to the bar. After a year or two he discontinued the practice of law and engaged in real estate business, which he still continues with success. Mr. Gale has a pleasant home on the corner of First Avenue south and Fourth street. He was married October 15th, 1861, to Miss Susan Damon, of Massachusetts. They are the parents of five children.

From, "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", Collected and Compiled by Edward A. Bromley, Voyageur Press. Mpls. 1890.


(Click to enlarge)

GALE, S. C. Minneapolis and S. C. Gale have been good friends and mutual admirers for about thirty-three years. mr. Gale was one of the many young men of the East who, about 1857, followed the Greeley idea and chased up the star of the empire. He was then thirty years old. He had the advantages of a thorough education at Yale and Harvard, and soon after his arrival in Minneapolis began the practice of law. It did not just suit his taste and he went into business a few years later. He has always been active in public enterprises of all kinds, notably the Exposition of later days. Minneapolis owes much to S. C. Gale, one of whose chief characteristics is modesty.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 549

GALPIN, G. R. a native of Tioga county, New York, was born March 27th, 1843. He resided there until 1869, when he came to Minneapolis; he engaged in different pursuits, and for a time worked at his trade of millwright, but finally in 1875, started in the grocery business, which he still conducts at No. 319 Washington Avenue north.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 549

GALPIN, Morenus was born in Auburn, New York, April 23d, 1843. In early life he moved with his parents to Battle Creek, Michigan, where he learned the carpenter's trade. In 1862, he enlisted in Merrill's horse, an independent regiment, designed for bodyguard to General Fremont, served until 1865 and was wounded five times. He came to Minneapolis in 1871; for two years was foreman for Frank Fleming, and was with George Libby five years. The firm of Galpin and Emerson was established April 1st, 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 305.

GAMACHE, F. born in Canada, in 1830. Moved to Michigan in 1850, and engaged in mining, three years. He located on his present farm in 1854. Married in 1852, Margaret Gandrow, who died in 1864. He was married again, in 1867, to Julia Lambert. They have had eight children. He has been Town Supervisor and School Director. He is one of the pioneers of this town. His was the first team brought to Dayton.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 549

GARDINER, Thomas Was born at Fredericton, New Brunswick, September 12th, 1833. He moved to St. Anthony in 1857, and remained until 1860, when he came to Minneapolis and engaged in the doing business with Dr. W. H. Leonard at the present stand of Janney, Brooks and Eastman. In 1868 the firm dissolved by mutual consent, and Mr. Gardiner went in business alone, establishing a homeopathic pharmacy, which despite the fact of its being a new departure, has from the first grown steadily. Mr. Gardiner married in 1862, Mary Knight, of Buffalo, New York. Their children are Louise and Mary.

 

Submitted by Jon A. Gardner kgardner4@wi.rr.com


(Click to enlarge)

GARDNER, Jeffery Watson and wife Ellen Rose Littel. Jeffery Watson Gardner was born March 22, 1845 in Michigan and died February 22, 1924 at his oldest son's farm in Granton, WI. Jeffery and Ellen were married on May 2, 1867. Ellen was born October 10, 1852 in Canada and died June 22, 1905 in Pepin, WI. They had the following children: Leslie Franklin b:  May 31, 1869, Effie Eliza b:  Aug. 4 1871, Clara May b:  Jan 14, 1873, Chauncy Bird b:  Jan 15, 1876, Adelbert (Dave) b:  Aug. 14, 1878

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 549

GARRITY, L. a native of County Mayo, Ireland, was born in 1841. He emigrated to America in 1858, and after a short residence in New York, located in Hudson, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1872; then removed to Minneapolis and embarked in the hotel business on Second Avenue south. In 1877 he went to his present location, No. 206 Washington Avenue south. He married Catharine Hopkins in November, 1869. Their children are Mary, Kate, James, Edward, Timothy and Annie.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 325

GARVAIS, Louis Pierre was born at Wolf River, near Montreal Canada, in 1810. Lived there sixteen years, and moved to Lake Champlain, New York, where he resided for twenty-two years; then came to Saint Paul, remained there two years, and one year in Saint Anthony, after which he came to what is now Maple Grove. He made his claim on what is known as Bottineau Prairie, and was the first settler in this town. For nearly two years their only neighbors were the Winnebago Indians. After he had been here nearly two years, the whites began to settle around him. He married Mary Twombley, in New York, October 15th, 1830. They have had ten children, four boys and six girls, all living, with the exception of the first born, who died at the age of eleven, in York State. On the 15th of October, 1880, Garvais and wife, celebrated their golden wedding, at Osseo, impressive ceremonies being held at the church. Eight children and seventy-five grand children were present.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 349

GARVEY, C. C. was born in New Brunswick, March 29th, 1828. At the age of four years he went with his parents to Maine. When he was but eighteen his father died, and it became his duty to cue for and support the family. In 1850 he came to Minnesota, made one of the first claims on the west side of the river, and received the second patent from Washington. Mr. Garvey attended the first election on this side of the river and cast the first ballot. He was married, in 1859, to Miss L. A. Nason. Nine children have been born to them.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 290

GASLIN, W. H. was born in Maine, December 8th, 1813. He lived there until 1853, when he moved to Ohio, and engaged in railroad contracting. In 1854, moved to Kentucky, where he was largely engaged in building railroads. In 1862 he bought horses for the government. He came to Minneapolis in 1866, engaged in business, and continued, until 1875; then went in the book trade, firm of Gaslin, Wales & Co., and remained until January, 1878, when he moved to his present residence on the Mississippi, twelve miles north of Minneapolis. Married, in June 1835, to Harriet Monk, of Maine. They have adopted two children; only one is now living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 549

GAU, C. A. a native of Germany,, was born in 1844. He came to the United States in 1866. For three years he lived in Carver, Minnesota, and kept the Railroad House; the rest of the time he has been a resident of Minneapolis, and since November, 1877, has been proprietor of the Union House, No. 613 Washington Avenue south. In 1872 he married Louise Thorn, who has borne him three children: Henry, Amelia and Louise.

 

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

GETCHELL, Warren H. was born Feb. 25, 1825, in the town of Bloomfield (now Skowhegan), Maine. When nine years of age the family moved "down east" to the town of Stetson, Penobscot County, Maine, and he assisted in clearing up a farm from the "primeval forest;" received a common school education and attended several terms of the Newport Academy, and taught in the district schools three winters before he was of age. In 1841the "home nest" became crowded, and his father purchased another farm in Carmel. Maine, where part of the family, including Mr. Getchell, resided. In 1846 he went to Boston, Mass., and engaged as clerk in a wholesale house until the spring of 1851, when he located in business with his brother at Ogdensburg, N. Y. Mr. Getchell was married in September 1857, to Drusella M. Pray of Livermore, Maine. In the fall of 1856 he came to Minneapolis. His wife died at Minneapolis the following winter.

Now, in his seventy-seventh year, Mr. Getchell is hale and hearty, enjoying the best of health and attending daily to his regular business duties as secretary of the Twin City Iron Works, one of the large manufacturing plants of Minneapolis.

Mr. Getchell enjoys meeting with the territorial pioneers at their gatherings, and last year, in addition to contributing his share toward the cost of the log cabin, presented the association with the large flag that was first used on Dedication Day, May 11, 1900.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 550

GIBBS, G.A. was born in Montreal, Canada, December 28th, 1841. In September 1861, he moved to Port Hope, Michigan, and the same fall enlisted in the Tenth Michigan Infantry, and served until August, 1865; he returned to Canada and worked at carpentering there until 1870, when he came to this city and continued in his trade several years. In 1877 he passed six months at Fort Custer, Montana, but returned in June 1878, and engaged as millwright at the Zenith mill; he now occupies the position of head millwright at the North-western mill. His wife was Anna Sweet, of Nova Scotia; they were married in September 1871. They have three children: Marion, Edgar and Howard.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 254

GIDEON, P.M. was born in Champaign county, Ohio in 1820. Lived there twenty-one years, then moved to Clinton, Illinois; from there to Excelsior, Minnesota, in 1853, where he found plenty of Indians, and but half a dozen families of whites around the lake. He is superintendent of the state experimental fruit farm, founded in 1878. He began fruit growing in 1854. His efforts have been experimental, and have been to his entire satisfaction, he is now one of the most successful fruit growers in Minnesota. Married Wealthy Hall, January 2d, 1849. They have seven children.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 282

GIEBENHAIN, George was born in Germany, March 29, 1827. He came to America in 1850; lived in New York state two years; went to Illinois, and remained about three years. In 1855 he came to Crystal Lake, Minnesota, and located where he now lives. He has 270 acres, 130 under cultivation. In 1864 he enlisted in Co. F, 5th Minn. Vol. Inf., and served till the war closed. He was in the two days battle at Nashville; went into it with 300 men, and lost 135. In 1855, he married Miss Margaret Schofield, of Crystal Lake. They have had twelve children, ten of whom are living; Louisa, Albert, Nicholas, William, Charles, Katherine, Peter, Edward, Frank and Eldina.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 550

GIERTSEN, N. H. a native of Norway, was born January 25th, 1852. He came to the United States in 1867, and settled in Minneapolis where he worked in various lines of business until 1871, when he opened a grocery and general merchandise store at 213 First street north where he still continues in business. Mr. Giertsen was married in 1874 to Mary Clark of this county. They have two children: Arthur and Mabel.

 

GIESE, August Not too much is known of the early family history.  August Giese was born in Polichno Hauland bie Nakel, in Germany.  His father’s name was Gottlieb Giese and his mother’s name was Florentine Ewald.  Augusta Giese was born bei Nakel, in Germany.  Her father’s name was Michael Dickmann and her mother’s name was Henrietta Klawetter. August and Augusta came to America in 1900 or 1901.  They entered via Ellis Island, New York.  Some of the children came to America ahead of the parents and then the rest of the family followed.  They come to Loretto, MN, Hennepin County, Greenwood Township, now called Greenfield Village.  They cleared land and settled near the Crow River about 1 miles from Hanover, MN.    Later they moved a little farther down the road to the place that was operated by son William and his wife Bertha.  Later the farm was operated by their son, Waldmar and his wife Caroline. Grandpa and Grandma Giese lived with their son, William and his wife Bertha all their life.  The original house burned down in 1930 and William had the house, which still remains on the farm, built in 1930.  The farm was sold in 1981.  Part of the farm is now a gravel pit. The house is occupied. August and Augusta had  14 children, one of whom, Emma (Giese) Neumann was my grandmother.

Submitted by Alvin G. Ebert - alebert@aol.com

 

Minneapolis Morning Tribune, Monday Dec. 17, 1928

Pioneer's Funeral Set for Wednesday

GIFFORD, Ichabod W. Pioneer's Funeral Set for Wednesday Rites for Ichabod W. GIFFORD to Be Held at Welander Temple Funeral srvices for Ichabod W. Gifford, 79 years old, who died Saturday at his residence, 3942 Stevens avenue, will be held Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at the Welander funeral temple.  Mr. Gifford, who had been a resident of Minneapolis for 42 years, retired from the carpentry and decorating business six years ago.  Surviving him are a son, Ernest, and two daughtes, Helen Gifford and Mrs. Amy Ackerson (AKERSON).  (If anyone has additional information on Mr. Gifford's family, I'm interested.  I have a lot of information on his first family with wife Zemine GEORGE). Submitted by  Jackie Ginn

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 550

GILES, Henry was born in Oxfordshire, England. He came to New York, July 6th, 1848, and remained until September 1849, having charge of the naturalist Audubon, during the time his mind was impaired he then went to Eldorado, Wisconsin, thence to Fon du Lac where he fitted up the Forest street steam mills; he then had charge of a mill in Menasha for about two years, and of the Lawrence mills at Appleton, three years. In March, 1878, he came here and was employed as head stonedresser at the "A" mill four years previous to the explosion and since July 1878, has been at the "C'' mill. He married Sarah Gilbert, July 16th, 1849; she has borne him seven children: Henry, Lucy, Willie, Louisa and Luella, twins, and Hattie. Gilbert died at the age of four years.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 551

GILLE, Charles a native of Prussia, was born September 25th, 1842. He came to America in 1852, and lived at Watertown, Wisconsin, until 1861, when he enlisted in the Twentieth Wisconsin Infantry, and served three years. He was mustered out, and reenlisted in the Forty-third Wisconsin Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He then went into the furniture business in Iowa, and from there to Mankato, Minnesota, where he was employed as carpenter until 1877, when he came here, and has since been a contractor for carpenter work; office on Third street and Fifteenth Avenue north-east. In 1869 he married Mary Malli, who has borne him seven children. Those living are: Lena, Emma, Bertha, William, and Herman.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 550

GILMAN. J. A. a native of Wisconsin, was born in Washington county in 1834. He lived there until 1873. He enlisted in the Twenty-first regiment of United States Volunteer Infantry, and at the battle of Chickamauga, in Georgia, he was captured and taken to Libby prison in company with sixty others. They were transferred several times and after fifteen months imprisonment Mr. Gilman and eleven others were exchanged, the remaining forty-nine having died during confinement. He was honorably discharged at Washington, August 6th, 1865. He then returned to his home in Wisconsin, and in 1873 he removed to Minnesota. He remained at St. Paul a few months, then became a resident of Minneapolis, where he has since resided. He has been in the employ of the St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba Railroad Company as en inspector, since his first locating here. July 3d, 1869, he married Amelia Marco, of Wisconsin. Four children have been born to them: John H., Nellie E., Fred R., and Albert A.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 551

GILMAN, J. Q. born December 1st, 1851, at Hallowell, Maine. When nineteen years of age he learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 1872 opened a shop at Richmond, Maine. Staid there only one year, and removed to Gardiner, where he worked in partnership with another man until 1877, when he came here, and worked at his trade on Sixth Avenue south. From there he moved to the corner of Fourth Avenue and Third street south, and in November, 1880, opened the shop where he now is, at 280 Fifth Avenue south. In June, 1878, he married Miss Ida Blaisdell.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 550

GILLESBY, J. was born in Hamilton, Connecticut, August 20th, 1855. He lived on a farm, and from boyhood engaged in buying and selling stock. He came to Minneapolis in 1873, and has been interested in the meat market business most of the time since. He is proprietor of the Clifton House, on Third street north-east; it is a fine little brick house of thirty rooms and nearly new. Mr. Gillesby married Katie Rice, of Red Wing, in November 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 550

GILMORE, D. M. born at Newville, Pennsylvania, in 1840. He came to this city in 1857, but on account of the financial crash, and the hard times resulting, he returned to Pennsylvania in the fall of the same year. In 1861 he enlisted in the Third Pennsylvania Cavalry, the first volunteer regiment of cavalry in the service. He commenced as corporal, but when mustered out in 1864, held the commission of captain; he was in many of the principal battles, and was wounded in January, 1864. After leaving the army he was in business in Pennsylvania for about one and one-half years, and in 1866, returned to Minnesota; he was in the auction business for six years, and since that time has been engaged in furniture manufacturing. His marriage with Miss Sarah Kyle, of Maryland, occurred in 1867. They reside at 909 Washington Avenue north.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.
Page 218

GILMORE, John F. was born in Ohio, December 2nd, 1816. While young he accompanied his parents to Illinois and resided in that state, occupied in reaching school until 1839, when he went to Mississippi and engaged in the same vocation. In 1845 he removed to Newport., Kentucky, where he was engaged in the nursery business for six years. In 1871 he came to Minnesota, residing at Faribault two years, engaged in the nursery business. He came to Hennepin county in 1873 and has since resided in Richfield. Was married Dec. 3d, 1872, to Miss Belle McClure. Their children are Molly and William.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 550

GILMORE J. H. born at Steubenville, Ohio, July 17th, 1848. When quite young he moved with his parents to Mount Pleasant, where he attended the public schools and worked at farming several years, and then was in the cattle trade until 1867. He read law in Illinois two years, spent the same length of time traveling in the west and returned home, and purchased an interest in a newspaper, which he sold in 1872 and removed to Chicago, thence to Minneapolis; here he followed printing for a time, then became associated with Mr. Baker in civil engineering; he now owns several farms in this state and is interested in real estate and lumbering. His nuptials with Abbie Chase were celebrated February 19th, 1879. They have one child, Raymond.

 

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GIRLING, W. M. a native of England, was born in 1830. He came to America, and following the business of his father and grandfather, went to manufacturing knitted goods. He started factories in Boston, and in New Hampshire, and Germantown, Pennsylvania. In 1874 he came here, and is now one of the proprietors of the Minneapolis Knitting Mills. Mr. Girling has a family of eight children, five sons and three daughters.

 

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GIRRBACH, G. F. was born March 29th, 1842, at Calmbach, Kingdom of Wurtemberg. In April, 1864, he came to America. Lived a few months in Connecticut, then to New York city, and in 1865 came here. He worked for the firm of J. Dean and Company until 1871, when he established himself in the grocery business, and the year following added a stock of general merchandise. He is doing a successful business at 1624 Fifth street south. His wife was Louisa Jager, whom he married in 1864. They are the parents of six children: Louisa, William, Lydia, Fred, Minnie, and Esther.

 

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GIVANS, James a native of Ohio, was born in 1830. He went to West Liberty, Iowa, in 1853, and engaged in the livery business. In 1872 he removed to Minneapolis, and occupied stables with Mr. Ensign until 1880, when he moved to the alley back of the city market. He has a sale stable exclusively. Mr. Givans married Mary Innman, of Pennsylvania, in 1855. She died in 1867, leaving three children: George, Sophia, and Callie. His second wife was Sarah Bozarth, whom he married in 1871. She has borne him three children: Daisy, Ethel, and Mary.

 

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GJERTSEN, Herman J. is a native of Norway, born October 29th, 1826. He followed farming and fishing in his native country until 1868 when he emigrated to America, settling in Isanti county, Minnesota. Came to Richfield in 1870 and in 1878 he bought 81 acres where he now resides. Married Albertina Olson of Norway in 1851. Family record is: Nels P., John C., Ole J., Henry J., Louis C., Assoria M., Eunice T., Sophia J., George H. Three children have died.

 

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GLEESON, Michael was born in Ireland in 1810, and came to this country in 1846. Landed in New York and went to Massachusetts where he resided until 1855, When he came west and settled in Hennepin county. He made a claim of 160 acres, which he has since increased by purchase to 278 acres. He was married in 1852 to Mary Bolden, of Ireland. They have had nine children, Michael, James and John, twins, Thomas, Mary Ann, Daniel, Bridget, Cornelius, William.

 

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GLENN, Mitchell W. was born December 24th, 1830, at Newark, New Jersey. In early childhood he moved to Mount Vernon, Ohio, and at the age of eleven entered a machine shop; he afterwards learned ironing carriages, and then returned to the machine shop. He entered the army as color-bearer of the Eighth Indiana, though he had the use of but one arm, the other being lame from an injury; at the battle of Rich Mountain, he carried the only colors on the field. He received several wounds at that battle, one shows plainly now over the left eye. After his return home he was commissioned adjutant of the Thirty-fifth Indiana, which position he held two years, and in 1863, he was made colonel of the One hundred and Seventeenth Ohio Militia. He came to this place in 1868, and went into the North Star Iron Works. In 1878, he purchased the Minneapolis Boiler Works. He has been a member of the city council since 1872, with the exception of one year, and vice-president of the council two terms; he was also chairman of the board of county commissioners for two years. His marriage with Mary Kelly, of Ohio, was celebrated October 8th, 1862. Their children are: J. Willard and Eugene.

 

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GLESSNER, William was born January 22d, 1816, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. When fifteen years of age he went to Ohio, and remained until the spring of 1854, when he came to St. Anthony. He entered a homestead and lived on it only one year, then returned to St. Anthony and engaged , with Mr. Johnson in the manufacture of furniture; after two years partnership Mr. Glessner carried on the business alone; in 1870, he abandoned manufacturing and entered the retail furniture and the undertaking business, which he still continues. His wife was Miss Abbie DeVaul, of Ohio, who has borne him five children. Mr. Glessner's residence is at the corner of Eighth street and Eighth Avenue, south-east.

 

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GLUEK, Gottleib was born April 22d, 1828, in Germany. In 1855, he came to America and the year following moved to Minneapolis. In 1857, he built a brewery, which was destroyed by fire and rebuilt in 1880; it has a capacity of forty-five barrels per pay. He married Caroline Foell in 1857; eleven children have been born to them, Louis, Charles, Emma (deceased), Emma, Jennie, Carrie, John, Louisa, Christina, Annie and Lydia. Mr. Gluek died October 16th, 1880.

 

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GLUCK, J. G. was born March 24th, 1833, in Bavaria. In 1849, he came to America and lived in New York city nearly four years, then was employed as journeyman at the tailor's trade which he learned in Bavaria. In 1857, he came here, and the year following, established himself in business as a merchant tailor at St. Anthony; since 1868, he has been on the west side of the river. He married Annie Gutzwieller in 1858, and in March 1876, she died, leaving four children, Franklin, John, Mary and George. His second wife was Franziska Boldt, who has borne him two children, Hugo and Albert.

 

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GODFREY, Ard a native of Penobscot county, Maine, was born at Orono, January 18th, 1813. His father and elder brother being mill-wrights, he learned that trade, and at the age of eighteen, had charge of building a lumber mill. In 1847 he came to St.. Anthony, to take charge of the improvements of the water power then inaugurated by Franklin Steele, Rantoul and others. He arrived in October, and in 1848 returned to Maine. While there he made arrangements with Steele to return to St. Anthony. He had quite an experience in building dams in Maine. After his return to this place he operated in lumber for Steele and others, also for himself, for several years. In 1852 he had a claim made for him by Captain Monroe, of Fort Snelling, near Minnehaha Falls, where he has since lived, with the exception of seven years spent in this city, to give his children better educational advantages. In 1853 he built a saw-mill on Minnehaha Creek, and in 1866 a grist-mill; both were destroyed by fire. He was married in January, 1838, to Harriet N. Burr, of Maine; children, Helen, now Mrs. M. Berry, of Minneapolis; Abner, a farmer near Hancock; Harriet B., a teacher; Martha A., Sarah C., now Mrs. Osborne, of this city; Mary and Minnie. Three children died in infancy. Mr. Godfrey resides on his farm near Minnehaha Falls where he has a pleasant home. (SEE ALSO BELOW)

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

GODFREY, Ard was born in Orono, on the Penobscot River, Maine, Jan. 18, 1813. His father was a millwright and the son, brought up about the saw mills, followed the same occupation. He came to St. Anthony Oct. 1, 1847, to construct. for Franklin Steele, the first dam and saw mill above the falls. Later he became a partner.

That fall a temporary dam was built between the east shore and Nicollet Island, and in October Caleb D. Dorr, with a crew of men, was sent to Swan River, near Little Falls, to get the timber for the permanent dam on Hennepin and Nicollet Islands. Daniel Stanchfield took another crew up Rum River. The mission, however, was a failure, as the logs were hung up at Pike Rapids, owing to the lateness of the season, and Stanchfield's logs did not fare any better. It was then decided to build the dam of hardwood logs cut from the lower end of Nicollet Island, and the work was carried on through the winter, and plank for the covering hauled from the St. Croix River, where a mill had been previously built by Steele and others.

Piers were built that winter for booming the logs, but no logs were received until Sept. 1, 1848, when Caleb Dorr, with a crew of log drivers, brought in the first lot of logs ever driven to the falls. The mill started up soon after, and that fall three frame houses were built, one for R. P. Russell, agent for Mr. Steele, one for Mr. Godfrey and one for Mr. Huse, and others quickly followed. In the winter Mr. Godfrey went cast for his family, who arrived at St. Anthony April 12, 1849.

Mr. Godfrey was the first postmaster at St. Anthony Falls, the office being established in the spring of 1851, with a weekly service to and from St. Paul.

Mr. Godfrey continued in business with Mr. Steele until 1852, when be left his home at St. Anthony and took a claim on the military reservation at Little Falls creek, which they occupied until it was transferred to the state by citizens of Minneapolis at a cost of $50,000 for the soldiers' home and park in 1888, after which time they made their home on Chicago avenue.

In 1853 Mr. Godfrey erected a dam on the creek below Minnehaha Falls and built a small saw mill and added buhr stones for grinding grain. Two or three years later the mill was destroyed by fire.

After Mr. Godfrey left the St. Anthony house it was successively occupied by R. P. Upton, Geo. A. Nourse, and Edwin Clark, with their families, until the fall of 1863. During all of these years many pioneers were sheltered beneath its roof. The house has been moved twice since its original location, once for opening a street to the Winslow House, and once to give room to the Union Iron Works shops. It is the oldest frame house in the city and is in a fair state of preservation. It would seem to be the proper thing for some society or association to have this house put in order and removed to one of the parks of the city for preservation.

Mr. Godfrey was married to Miss Harriet Newell Burr in 1838. He died in Minneapolis in 1895.

 

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

GODFREY, Harriet Newell ( Burr ) was married to Ard Godfrey at Orono, Me., and came to St. Anthony Falls with her husband, April 12, 1849, and a few weeks later May 30 gave birth to the first white child born at St Anthony Falls, Harriet R. Godfrey.

It was in the parlor of their house that the first Masonic lodge at the Falls -- the Cataract -- was organized on the 14th day of February, 1851. A. F. Ames, William Smith, Isaac Brown. Ard Godfrey, J. H. Stevens, D. M . Coolbaugh, H. S. Atwood and William Brotuter, officers. At the first meeting Mrs. Godfrey acted as tyler, and young Abner sat on the stairs to watch for intruders. The first to become masons here were Isaac Atwater, J. G. Lennon, Anson Northrup, J. C. Gairnes, J. H. Murphy and R. W. Cummings.

The Chickering piano of Mrs. Godfrey, which was the first one brought to the Falls, has been loaned the Territorial Pioneer Association by her children, and is now at the log cabin of the association at the State Fair Grounds, where it is used by the pioneers at their meetings.

Mrs. Godfrey died at Minneapolis in 1897.

 

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GOEHRINGER, Chris came to Minnesota in 1865, and located at North Branch; he was one of four men who located and named the town. He resided there about three and one-half years, then came to this city and worked in a saw-mill two years. For a short time he was in the grocery business, then started a saloon on First Avenue north, and is now in the same business at 101 Nicollet avenue. In 1870 he helped to organize hose company number three, and in 1872 was elected its first assistant, which position he held until 1875, when he was elected foreman, and acted in that capacity until the company disbanded in 1879. He married Mary Nieson in 1870. Their children are Lena, Chris and Kate.

 

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GONYEA, O. A. a native of Maine, was born January 26th, 1833. He came to Minneapolis in 1865, and for sixteen years worked in the woods and on the river. He is proprietor of the New Idea billiard hall, No. 21 Main street south-east, which he built in 1872. His wife was Catherine Hogan, whom he married in 1861. They have four children: William, Lillie, Nellie and Charles.

 

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GOODALE, John W. born in Liverpool, July 24th, 1803. Came to America when seven years of age. Lived in New Brunswick a short time; then went to Maine. Finally settled in Brooklyn, in 1853, and has since made it his home, with the exception of three years spent in Crystal Lake. Married in Penobscot county, Maine, in 1831, to Nancy R. Willis. Nine children have been born to them, four of whom are now living.

 

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GOODE, A. H. is a gentleman whose long experience well qualifies him to fill the position he holds as manager of the Minneapolis branch house of J. H. Kerrick and Company. This firm manufacture and deal in iron and wood-working machinery and supplies.

 

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GOODRICH. P. was born at Rochester, New York, in 1857. At the age of three years he went with his mother to Boston and lived eight years; then after passing three years in Chicago, he returned to Rochester to prepare for college; he graduated from the university of that city in 1880, and came to Minneapolis in August of the same year. In September, 1880, he purchased in company with J. T. Barnum, the trunk manufactory of D. D. Whitney, which business they are now conducting at 26 Washington Avenue north.

 

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GOODRICH, Samuel Augustin was born in Benson, Vermont, September 19th, 1827. In 1832 his parents moved to Du Page county, Illinois. He there attended school, and in due time entered Knox College, Galesburg. His health would not permit him to complete his course and he left college. In 1852, in company with others, he came to this town and made a claim where his family now resides. In 1854, and again in 1856, he visited Illinois. During the last visit he married, at Chicago. His wife was a Miss Adams, a native of Enosburgh, Vermont, born March 18th, 1830. She came to Chicago, in 1854. Mr. Goodrich was the first assessor for Hennepin county, and held the office of Justice of the Peace. He died Nov. 21st, 1865. There were six children. Mrs. Goodrich still resides on the old homestead.

 

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GOODRICH, W. H. was born in Carroll county, New Hampshire November 21st, 1844. When ten years of age he came to Hennepin county with his father, who took a claim in Brooklyn, and was afterward killed by a falling tree. W. H. bought eighty acres in Brooklyn, in 1865. He was married in July 1864, to Mary A. Gibbs. They have five children: J. Albert, William A., Eugene H., Eva L. and Milo E.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

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GOODSPEED, E. A. was born in 1854, at Vassalborough, Maine. He came to Minneapolis in April, 1871, and was engaged in the lumber trade until 1877, when he became a member of the firm of Goodspeed and Sons, wholesale dealers in sheep. This business is exclusively wholesale, and they sell either on foot or dressed. The individual members of the firm are A. H., J. B., and E. A. Goodspeed. April 13th, 1879, Mr. Goodspeed married Mary Townsend They have one child.

 

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GOODWIN, W. H. was born in New Brunswick, June 4th, 1812. He moved with his parents to Calais, Maine, where he lived until he came to Hennepin county, in 1851, and took a claim in what is now the center of the city of Minneapolis. He lived there sixteen years. In 1867 he moved to his present location at Brooklyn Centre. Married to Susan H. Fletcher, August 16th, 1845. They have three children living: A. J., Harriet A. and Bertha F.

 

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GORDON, E. a native of New Hampshire, was born in July, 1853. When fourteen years of age he commenced learning the mason's trade, and has followed that occupation since. In 1855 he came with his parents to St. Anthony, and in 1867 removed to Colorado, he went to Michigan in 1876, and returned to this city in 1878, since which time he has done business here as contractor for masonry work: he makes a specialty of plastering, cistern-building and kalsomining. His residence is No. 810 Washington Avenue north.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

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GORHAM, David one of the earliest settlers of Hennepin county, was born in Quebec, Canada. When he was four years of age his father died, and David went to Montreal. He was occupied in farming until 1836, when he came to the United States, and resided two-years in Virginia, and twelve years in Maine, engaged in lumbering on the Penobscot. In April 1849, he came to St. Anthony. He made a claim of 160 acres in what is now North Minneapolis, and also of the farm now owned by R. P. Russell, near Lake Calhoun. He ran the first shingle and lath mill in the place. In 1854, he made a claim in what is now Plymouth township, and after remaining on it one year, returned to Minneapolis, where he was engaged in the lumber mills for about twelve years. In 1864, he, in company with others, started for California, but on reaching the Bad Lands, were surrounded by Sioux Indians, and held seventeen days, then rescued by General Sully's Cavalry. They then returned to Minneapolis, satisfied with their adventure. In 1867 he bought his present farm, and has since lived in Plymouth. He hard held the office of Supervisor for ten years, and has done much for the cause of education. He was married, in 1850, to Miss Barber, of Maine. They have had nine children; seven of whom are living: Addelle., Thados, Edwina, David G. T., Emma, Lizzie, and Angelina M. Mary L. died the day of her birth, and Angelina died at the age of twelve years.

 

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GORMAN, L. B. a native of Quebec, was born in September, 1853. He came to the United States in 1867, and followed the lumber business at Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, for one year. In 1868 he came to Minneapolis and continued the same work until June, 1878, when he took the billiard hall at the corner of Hennepin Avenue and Second street. His marriage with Jennette Hibbard occurred December 25th, 1878.

 

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GOULD, William W. was born in Canada, December 15th, 1840. He learned the milling business in Uxbridge, Ontario county, and in September, 1865, moved to South Bend, Indiana, where he taught school one year, then went to Boone county, Iowa, and was employed in cabinet and carpenter work one year, thence to Council Bluffs, where he worked as carpenter for the Chicago and Northwestern Railway. He returned to South Bend and worked at milling and cabinet making until June, 1878, when he came to this city and helped build the Pettit and Washburn mills; since June, 1880, he has been employed as Mill-wright at the North-western, mill. He married Alice Burdic in 1873., They have one child, Harry.

 

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GRANDY, J. L. was born in Dundas county, Canada, in 1825. He moved with his parents to St. Lawrence county, New York, and lived there until 1847, when he went to Wisconsin. He did carpenter and jobbing work at Grand Rapids until the war broke out, when he enlisted in the Eighteenth Wisconsin Volunteers, served one year and was discharged for disability. In the spring of 1863 he removed to Beaver Dam and remained four yews in the employ of J. H. Rowell & Co., manufacturers of seeders. Since the fall of 1867 he has resided in Minneapolis, engaged in the manufacture of the New Comet washing machines. He married Pauline Eaton, in Wisconsin. They have four children, Phoebe Ann, Augustus, Louis Lincoln and Ida May.

 

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GRAVE, Allen, was born in Kent county, Delaware, in 1811. He came to Hennepin county in 1855, and settled near Long Lake; at that time the country was thinly settled. In 1857 he suffered much from the ravages of the grasshoppers. He married in 1833, Mary Teas, of Wayne county, Indiana. They have six children now living.

 

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GRAVES, C. A. was born at Cameron, Somerset county, Maine, April 26th, 1837. In early manhood he commenced to work at building, and was engaged on saw mills on the Penobscot river, and at different places in the United States and Canada. In 1857 he came to St. Anthony; worked at his trade on the St. Croix river two years, thence to Stillwater, where he remained until 1864, when he went south and worked one year for the government construction department. In 1867 he came to Minneapolis and since that time has been employed constructing mills.

 

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GRAY, A.N. was born in Duchess county, New York, August 29th, 1824. In 1880, moved with parents to Pennsylvania, and engaged in farming until eighteen years of age, when he engaged in lumbering, also learning the trade of millwright. He came to Minnesota in 1853, and settled in Minnetonka township. In August, 1864, he enlisted in Company B, Eleventh Inf., serving in the Commissary Department. He was the first Overseer of Highways in the township after its organization, and member of the town board in 1861-62-63. Married Susan A. Chowen, in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, May 30th, 1847. They have had eleven children. Those living are L Alcester E., Phoebe C., Sybilla H., Ernest W., Willie E. and Jessie W.

 

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GRAY, Charles E. born at Westerly, Washington county, Maine, October 7th, 1849. When six years of age he came here and at the age of eighteen commenced lumbering, which employment he continued for seven years. In 1874 he engaged in the milling business at the North Star mill; remained two and one-half years with this firm, being part of the time in charge of a mill at Long Lake, since then he has been at the North-western mill. Mr. Gray married Eva Lowell, April 4th, 1876. They had one child, Sadie, who died in infancy.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Bill Boggess william-boggess@webtv.netGRAY,

Harriette Amanda (Flora) Harriette was apparently named for both grandmothers. She was born Friday, 17 September 1869, according to 1926, Volume II and subsequent editions of "The Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy", and 19 June 1956, obituary in "The Courier-Gazette", of Rockland, Maine --- and according to William G Cutler's writings of 1883, "... the first white child born in Montgomery county, Kansas.". She was married 6 December 1886 to "Frisco's" Carl Raymond Gray (1867AR-1939DC), who had boarded at her father's "Condon House".

Harriette spent over 52 of Carl's 56+ years of railroad career with him. She also remained ever so close to her Flora family. The first 28 years were with "Frisco", Saint Louis & San Francisco RR, starting at age 15 in Rogers, Arkansas, then Oswego, then Wichita where first son Carl Raymond (1889KS-1955 MN) was born, then Neodesha,son Russell Davis (1899 KS-1875 NJ) born at Wichita. Son Howard Kramer (1901 MO-1955 MN) born Saint Louis. Carl was president of Great Northern RR from 1912 to 1914. Carl is on page 479 in Volume I and sons Carl Jr. & Howard are in Volume III, "Who was Who in America", sons also in Volumes 27 & 29 "Who's Who in America", and, plus Harriette, are in "The Compendium of American Genealogy". Carl Jr. was Boreas Rex V in 1939. Harriette taught Bible Classes from the get-go and was first women to be nation-wide on radio, WOW - Omaha, with a Bible Class. Friends hosted Gray's Golden Wedding Anniversary party, with 1,400 guest in Omaha, found in 21 December 1936 issue of "Life" Magazine's, pages 68-72. She was selected "American Mother of 1937" ("Time" Magazine, 3 May 1937, page 17) by Golden Rule Foundation. Carl became president of Union Pacific RR 1920, vice-chairman 1937 ("Time" Magazine, 26 Apr 1937, page 74), and selected as Trustee at Colby College, Waterville, ME in 1938, his father's 1855 Alma Mater. He received honorary LL D degrees from University of Maryland, 1916, University of Arkansas, 1929, Washington and Jefferson College, and at Sioux Falls college in 1937.

Carl was found dead in his bed at Mayflower Hotel, Washington D C Tuesday, 9 May 1939. He had dinner with two of his sons, evening before 70th anniversary celebration for cross-country railroads of 10 May 1869. His death was announced while movie "Union Pacific" was being shown at Strand theater. Harriette died after 3 weeks in Knox Hospital, Rockland, Maine, 17 June 1956, both buried with second son, Russell, his wife and their son in Druid Ridge Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Carl Raymond Gray included his step-sister-in-law, "Mrs Elmer Clark" (Linnie C), in his 1939 will. October 1989, a RR Caboose was dedicated at Oswego, Kansas in memory of Harriette & Carl Gray and Hobart Holmberg Young. Their life story follows his parents: http://www.rootsweb.com/~arwashin/pics/grays.html>, also Gray's tombstone
at Druid Ridge Cemetery, Baltimore, MD. http://www.crowolf.net/illuminations/000039.html>

Additional Comments:

Carl Raymond GRAY Jr. was Veterans Administrator under President Harry Truman, and lived in Saint Paul where he died 1955, and is found in Who's Who in American, Vol. 27 & 29.

Howard Kramer GRAY, M D , was a member of "The Team of Destiny" at Princeton, becoming a medical doctor and served at Mayo Clinic, died also 1955, and is found in Who's Who in America, Vol. 27 & 29.

 

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GRAY, Thomas K. was born in Lincoln county, Maine, in June, 1833. His home has been in Minneapolis since October, 1855. In 1866 he married Julia Allen; they are the parents of five children: Horace, Edward, Herbert, Gracie and Daisy. Mr. Gray is a partner in the firm of Gray and Hofflin of this city, and is also in the drug business at No. 108 Bridge square; this business was established in 1856 by John D. Gray and Dr. M. R. Greely. In 1858, T. K. Gray bought the doctor's interest and the firm of Gray Brothers continued until 1870, when John D. was obliged to travel for his health, and Mr. T. K. Gray has since been alone in the business. In 1865 the present building was erected; three stories and the basement are occupied for the transaction of this large and increasing business.

 

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GREELY, W. Q. was born May 20th, 1827, in Waldo county, Maine. He attended school until seventeen years of age, when he commenced to learn blacksmithing. He went to Bangor, where for five years he worked at forging for Pope and Lang; also fitted up a factory at North Vassel-borough, Maine. Since October, 1855 he has lived at St. Anthony. He occupied various locations for a number of years, and finally built a shop on Main street south-east. This was destroyed by fire, and in 1877 he purchased the shop he now occupies, No. 121 Main street south-east. His wife was Amanda Gowan, of Bradford, Maine. They have two children living: Otto and Alice.

 

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GREEN, John born in New Brunswick, in 1820. He lived there until twenty years of age, engaged in farming: then went to Maine, and for eleven years was in the lumber business. In the fan of 1853 he came to Minneapolis, and in 1855, took by pre-emption the farm he still owns, and built his present residence in 1875. Mr. Green was married, in 1850, at Old Town, Maine, to Mary Hutchins, who was born in 1830, at Knox, Waldo county, Maine. They have three children : James, Rhoda, and Luella.

 

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GREEN, M.A. a native of Pennsylvania, was born July 22d, 1818. When twenty-one years of age, he moved to Belleville, Illinois, where he , worked at saddlery and farming. He enlisted in 1846, for the Mexican war, in Company G, second Illinois, served one year, and was wounded at the battle of Buena Vista. In 1862 he settled in Brooklyn, Minnesota, where he has since lived. Married in November 1847, to Margaret Jared. They have eight children living: Alexander N., Duff D., Benjaman E., Mary E., Sarah C., Margaret O., William.H. and Frederick A.

 

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GRETHEN, Anton a native of Germany, was born in November, 1834, and in 1854 emigrated. to America. He read law with Brisbin and Bigelow, of St. Paul, and was admitted to the bar in December, 1858. He followed his profession until elected auditor of Hennepin county in 1864. This office he filled until 1871, when he resumed his law practice in the firm of D. G. Shillock, and afterward with General Baxter. In 1880 he was elected alderman for the First ward. Mr. Grethen resides on Nicollet Island. He was married in 1857 to Babette Jenkins. Their children are: Emilie, Adolf and Otto.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 554

GRIFFITH, J. M. was born in 1835, in Germany. When a child he came with his parents to America, and lived in Saint Clair county, Illinois, until twenty-one years of age, and then in Montgomery county five years. He removed to Montana, where, for nine years, he was engaged in contracting and building, also operated a saw-mill, and for a time conducted a general merchandise business. His marriage with Carrie Sharp occurred in April, 1867. They are the parents of five children: Ernest, Benjamin, Mary, Franklin, and an infant. He is now engaged in the manufacture of brooms., and dealing in broom corn.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 554

GRIME, John a native of England, was born in 1846. He came to America in 1869, and locating at Scranton, Pennsylvania, commenced work in the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western railway shops, where he was employed until 1870; that year he came to Minneapolis and worked for the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway Company until 1872, when he went to the Harvester Works, and in April, 1880, began preparations for his present business, that of manufacturing machinists' and engineers' tools. Mr. Grime was married in this city, September 22d, 1875, to Emma Morrill. They have one son, Edward.

 


(click on photo to enlarge)
GRIMES, Jonathan Taylor, was born at Leesburg, Loudoun County VA., May 10, 1818. Oldest child of George and Elizabeth (Donahoe) Grimes. The family moved to Terre Haute Indiana about 1840 and Jonathan married Eliza Angeline Gordon in Terre Haute IN on Sept 20, 1843.  Eliza Angeline Donahoe was the daughter of John and Anna (Armstrong) Gordon, born July 12, 1826 in Springboro (near Cincinnati) OH. Jonathan and Eliza moved to Minneapolis MN in the spring of 1856 with their three small children.  Eliza Grimes died in Minneapolis on Nov 15, 1902 at their home at 3209 Nicollet Ave., and Jonathan died in Minneapolis on Feb 10, 1903 at the home of his daughter Ella at 3400 1st Ave So.  Both are buried at Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis. Further information on the Grimes family can be found at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jtgrimes/  Information supplied by Ralph S. Grimes.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 554

GRIMSHAW, William a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was born December 6th, 1853. He came to Minneapolis with his parents in 1855; he studied here and graduated from the only high school in the city at that time. When only fourteen years of age he commenced the carpenter's trade, working with his father summers and attending school winters; his business is now that of architect and builder. He was married in October, 1876, to Miss Minnie, daughter of George Roberts, of Wisconsin.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 554

GRINDALL, E. S. was born at Penobscot, Maine, March, 1832. He moved with his parents to Bangor, and followed butchering for five years; then he went to Boston and engaged in draying until 1855, when he removed to Iowa, and a few months later, to this city. He was with Hause and Bailey for a time, and then in the employ of Stimson and Hayes, and in 1855-56 assisted in drawing stone for the old Winslow House. In 1865 he started a dray line, which he has since continued with profit. He was married in 1858 to Sarah Smith. They are the parents of four children: Sabine, George, Eaber and Bertie. Mr. Grindall's father, was county commissioner for several years; his mother is still living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 356

GRINDALL, Elijah W. was born September 20th, 1804, at Penobscot, Hancock county, Maine. He received his education in the public schools, and then worked at farming. In January, 1826, he married Caroline Higgins, who bore him nine children. Mr. Grindall came to St. Anthony in 1854, after a few months residence in Iowa. He was an energetic farmer, and served as County Commissioner several terms. His death occurred in 1872. Mrs. Grindall and her youngest son, Olin, live at the farm.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 554

GROSBSCH, John a native of Germany, was born in 1846. He came to America in 1868, and lived on a farm one year near Albert Lea; from there he went to Steele county where he worked on a farm and in a brewery until 1871, when he removed to this city, and was in a brewery here four years, then started a saloon on Washington Avenue, and in the spring of 1880 moved to his present location He married Theresa Hausler in 1876. Their children are Mary and John.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 554

GROVER, Freeman a native of New Brunswick, was born September 13th, 1831. In 1857 he moved to Wisconsin and was in the lumber business until 1875, then he went south and for three years, was engaged in growing oranges in Florida, but returned to Wisconsin and in 1880 came to this city. He is proprietor of the Butler Hotel, No.709 Third street south. In June,1862, he married Margaret Heasely. Five children have been born to them: John, Mary, Otis, George and Ward.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 554

GRYGLA, Frank born in 1848, at Cracow, Poland, and emigrated to America in 1870; he lived in Milwaukee two years, then removed to Chicago. In 1877 he came to Minneapolis and in company with Mr. Selden engaged the manufacture of galvanized iron cornice, fire and water-proof sky lights, elevator buckets, doors and shutters, etc., No.114 Third street north. Mr. Grygla was married in 1877. He is the father of two children.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 555

GUILDER, Absalom R. born at Milton, Vermont, in August, 1826. He lived with his parents until 1842, when he moved to Watertown, Wisconsin, and engaged in building the "Old Yellow mill" of that place. In 1866 he came to Minneapolis to assist in the construction of the Washburn B mill; after its completion he turned his attention to a long felt want of those interested in milling; after a long and laborious task he was rewarded with a series of patents, which placed him in the front rank of our ablest inventors. In June, 1872, he secured his first patent for a middlings purifier, the second in December of the same year, the third in October, 1873, the fourth in September, 1874, the fifth in May, 1875, and the sixth was for drying and draining hose. In April 1876, he made an improvement on granulating machines, and in September, 1876, another patent on middlings purifiers, July, 1877, an improvement on the turbine wheel. and in 1877, 1878, and 1880, he received re-issues on several of them; they are all patented in the United States and Canada and his machinery has been sold in all parts of the world where flour is manufactured. Mr. Guilder married Eva Collins in I 850. They have one child, Ella. Mrs. Guilder died February 10th 1871.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 555

GUIMON, Simon was born in Quebec, Canada, May 12th, 1840. He moved to Dayton, Minnesota in 1862, and for four years was in the wood business; in 1866, he moved to Anoka, and worked eleven years as rawyer in the mills; he removed to this city in 1877, spent two years more in the wood business, and in May, 1880, bought the Union house, 121 First street north. His wife was Ellen Goodin; they were married in July, 1866; seven children have been born to then, those living are Mary, Josephine, Simon, Nellie, and Ida.

 

Submitted by Patty Guimont ,from Guimont History and Obituary for Francis Guimont.
freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~patty0802

GUIMONT, Francis Oliver (Frank)
1832-1925
Parents: Francois Olivier and Marie Soulange Moreau

Three brothers; FRANCOIS, ALFRED (ALPHEE) and GEORGES arrived in Dayton around 1850.  They came up the river from St. Paul, and Francois was to say many years later, that they could just as well have stopped near St. Anthony Falls to settle down, but the urge to go on for some reason or other - caused them to eventually settle along the banks of the Mississippi in Dayton.

Francois Guimont came to Minnesota as a youth when the state was still largely a wilderness and saw it become populous and modernized.  Settling in Dayton in 1848 he helped to send the first raft of logs down the Mississippi, and lived to see the day when there were no more logs to be seen upon the stream.

Francois and Alphee married twin sisters.  Francois married Philomene Baudet and Alphee married Nathalie Baudet.  They lived close to each other.  For some reason Alphee spelled his name with a "g" on his mailbox, while Francois and Georges kept the "t" in the Guimont surname. 
Georges was to marry Marie Caouette many years later than his two older brothers married.  His children were therefore  much younger than the children of Francois and Alphee.

The brothers were great card players and usually each evening they  played, it would end with one of them stomping off home in a "huff."  But come the next evening, (after a certain amount of sitting in the same room not speaking), Philomene would smooth it over and then the game would continue.

Francois and Philomene were parents of twelve children; Nelson (Narcisse), Marie Josephine, Marie Sophie, Melina, Francois Alphonse (Henry), George, Marie Emelina, Olivier Francois L., Jean, Ida Agnes, Eli Norman, and Joseph Octave.

 

GUIMONT, George 1838 - 1934
Parents:  Francois  Olivier and Marie Soulange Moreau
Born at Cap St. Ignace, Canada, he came to the United States by ox team with his two brothers, Frank and Alpha.  His farm was three miles south of Dayton village.  His brother, Frank, the oldest one of the brothers, died in Anoka at the age of 94, and his brother Alpha, died in Anoka at the age of 88. 

He married in 1883 to Mary Caouette and they had four children; George Napoleon, Marie Louisa, Joseph Alphonse, and Josephine Exilda.

For many years, Mr. Guimont had been  prominent in the Dayton community.  He was an old time fiddler and dancer of considerable renown and won first prize in an old time fiddler's contest held at Dayton.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 555

GUNNERSEN, S. R. was born in Norway, in 1844. He attended school in his native town until his eighteenth year, when he entered the University at Christiana. Passed all the degrees common to a divinity student, and in 1867, took the degree of D. D. Afterwards studied theology in Germany. After traveling through several European countries, came to Augsburg Seminary, Minneapolis, in 1874, and was elected a member of its faculty.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com


John, Rosina and Anna Gygli
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GYGLI, Fridolin Johann born on March 9,1823 at Bern, Switzerland.  He married Rosina nee Schenk born on June 14,1832 and married about 1852.  One son, Johann Robert, was born on Nov.19,1856  who served in the Swiss army until age 20 before he came to America in 1876. Their daughter Anna was born on July 14,1858 who married John P. Blesi, and daughter Mary, born on Apr.16,1861 who married Theodore Ferrian. The family came in 1868 to New Schwanden, MN. and lived on the north and west side of Mud Lake of Maple grove township. John Frederick Jr. married Rosa Wild and had 3 children;  Edward, Rose (who remained single) and Fred John who married Anna Wod- tke and had 2 children, Lorraine "Pavey" and Donald Gigli. There is no grave site to be found or records for Fridolin Johann or Rosina Gigli who married a Wagner buy a death certificate for Rosina  was recorded in 1882 in Osseo,MN. However, her place of her burial site is unknown.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com


John Robert Gigli
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GIGLI, John Robert was born on Nov.19,1856 at Bern, Switzerland. He served in the Swiss Army Cavalry until age 20 and came to New Schwanden, MN. after 1872 and worked for many farmers in the Swiss community. He never  married and did not save his earnings and stayed very poor. Some say he drank it all up and towards the last he didn't spend money for boots or shoes and he would wrap his feet up in layers of gunny-sacks to keep warm. The last several years he spent at the House for The Poor on Medicine Lake in Plymouth, MN. In the end he committed suicide and died on Jan.22, 1926. John is buried in the potters field in St.Fridolin's Cemetery  of New Schwanden, Champlin, MN.