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History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 348

EARENFIGHT, C. T. born in 1841, at Cincinnati, Ohio. He 7 lived in Illinois five years, then a short time in Indiana, and in 1863, removed to Minnesota; he has lived in Minneapolis, or near there most of the time since. He has eighteen acres of land on section 6, and is engaged in gardening; is also a wholesale dealer in cattle, on foot and dressed.

 

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

EASTMAN, Charlotte A. was born and passed her early childhood in Conway, N. H. In September, 1854, in company with her brother, W. W. Eastman of this city, she came to St. Anthony, arriving at St. Paul from Galena on the steamer War Eagle. She was married Feb. 27, 1855, at the home of another brother, John W. Eastman, by judge Lardner Bostwick, then a justice of the peace, to David Adams Secombe. A large number of the early settlers were present at the ceremony, which was one of the first weddings of the community. Mrs. Secombe has been a resident continuously of that part of the city which was then St. Anthony, residing at present on Nicollet Island.

 

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

EASTMAN, John Whittemore was born in Conway, New Hampshire, October 28, 1820. He was the son of Wm. K. Eastman, of old Colonial and Revolutionary stock. He was educated at the Fryeburg (Me.) Academy and graduated at the academy at Plymouth. From 1840 to 1847 he was employed by wholesale houses in either Boston or Buenos Ayres, South America, as accountant or supercargo. In 1849 he sailed around the Horn for California, where he mined; then purchased a schooner and went into the carrying trade between Mexico and California ports; then into the cattle business, and finally into the fruit business in Southern California. In 1853 he sailed for Melbourne, Australia, with a cargo of mining implements, and then sailed for New York, taking the Nicaragua route, arriving in January, 1854. He returned to Conway, and on March 9, 1854, married Susan Maria Farrington.

Soon they started west, and settled in St. Anthony. Among Mr. Eastman's early enterprises was the establishing of the town of Merrimac, some miles below St. Paul. A company was formed, several farms purchased, and a sawmill erected, but a freshet changing the channel of the river, the scheme was abandoned.

Mr. Eastman was the first man to originate and carry out the enterprise of erecting a large flour mill at St. Anthony Falls. Associated with him were John Rollins and R. P. Upton. They built the "Minnesota Flouring Mill" on the east side of Hennepin Island, and soon W. W. Eastman became a partner. The mill had three run of stone, and manufactured one hundred barrels of flour per day, and was a success from the start. The wheat was supplied in part by the neighboring farmers, but the larger portion of it came from Iowa and Wisconsin, in boats to St. Paul, and thence to St. Anthony by teams. The market, in addition to the local consumption, was with emigrants, who took thousands of barrels in their "prairie schooners' in their westward course; also to the fur traders of the Red River Valley of the North.

In 1857 Captain Rollins retired from the firm, and in 1858 W. W. Eastman retired, and Mr. Upton sold out to William F. Cahill. The firm now became Eastman & Cahill, and the mill name changed to "Island Mills." The mill was remodeled and enlarged, having five run of stone, with a capacity of five hundred barrels a day, and employed fifteen men. This change cost $45,000. The first flour exported to eastern markets from Minnesota was made by this mill. During the War of the Rebellion many thousands of barrels were supplied to the army, the firm taking large government contracts. The annual output from the mills of Eastman & Cahill for several years averaged about thirty-two thousand barrels. Eastman & Cahill were also proprietors of large cooper shops located on the lower end of Hennepin Island, employing about one hundred men. In 1867 the Minneapolis Millers' Association was organized, and Eastman & Cahill became charter members of that body.

After retiring from the flour business in 1869 Mr. Eastman, in company with Elijah Moulton, built a large planning and re-sawing mill on Hennepin Island. In a few years he sold out his interest to Mr. Moulton. Mr. Eastman built three houses on University Avenue, near Eighth Avenue S., the first in 1854, and the other two in 1880, where he resided since coming to Minnesota. Mr. Eastman was a Royal Arch Mason, a Republican in politics, and voted on the admitting of both California and Minnesota into the Union.

During the latter years of his life Mr. Eastman became a great reader, not only of the current literature of the day, but of scientific and philosophical works. On February 19, 1899, Mr. Eastman died. In the obituary notices, the Minneapolis journal says:

"John Whittemore Eastman, a resident of Minneapolis for the past forty-five years, a pioneer flour miller and one of the leading men of the city, passed away yesterday morning at his home, 716 University Avenue S. E. Death was due to paralysis of the heart. Last December Mr. Eastman had a severe attack of the grip, from which he never completely recovered. Yesterday morning he complained of pains in the chest, and as his condition continued to grow serious, physicians were summoned. Death came soon after their arrival. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon, at 2 o'clock, from the residence. The Rev. M. D. Hardin, pastor of Andrew Presbyterian church, of which the deceased was a member, will conduct the services. The remains will be taken to Lakewood cemetery. The deceased leaves a wife and two sons, Dr. Arthur M. Eastman of St. Paul, and Alfred F. Eastman of Skaguay." (ALSO SEE BELOW)

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

EASTMAN, Mrs. John W., whose maiden name was Susan Maria Farrington. was born in Conway, New Hampshire, April 26, 1827. She was the daughter of Jeremiah and Rachel (Horne) Farrington, and was of old Puritan stock. She was educated at the town school, the "South Conway Seminary" and Fryeburg (Me.) Academy. At the age of sixteen she began teaching school, first in the town school. then in the South Conway Seminary, continuing it for about ten years.

On March 9, 1854, she was married to John W, Eastman and moved with him to St. Anthony. In the early sixties she united with the Andrew Presbyterian Church, and for many years was one of its most active members. The entertainments, fairs and socials, the charitable and benevolent work of the church, always found in her a hearty and earnest worker. For many years she taught in the Sunday school, and many of' her scholars could bear testimony to her earnest endeavor for their welfare. On December 5, 1865, she had a great bereavement in the death of her only daughter, and it was many years before she could overcome this great sorrow.

Mrs. Eastman was quite literary in her tastes, and kept posted on the current literature of the day. But what may be written of the love and self-sacrifices of a true mother towards her children? The achievements of man may be recorded, the battles they fight and the victories they win may have a place in history; but the historian has not yet been born who can adequately express the hopes, the fears, the days of anxiety and the nights of prayer of a loving Christian mother. Such a mother was Mrs. Eastman; always full of good cheer and encouragement. Scores both young and old sought her society, and were better for the seeking.

On February 19, 1899 her husband suddenly died, and from this blow she never recovered. On June 13, 1900, she died after a short illness of pneumonia, bemoaned by a large circle of friends. As the Rev. Mr. Hardin said, "Her presence was a benediction to all who knew her, and her memory will be sacred to all."

 

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

EASTMAN, William Wallace was born February 6, 1827, at Conway, New Hampshire. His youth and early manhood were spent in Conway. He was educated in the town school, the North Conway Academy and the South Conway Seminary. During his early years he was principally occupied working in his father's paper mill, in which he had an interest, and driving stage through the mountains.

In 1850 he went to California by way of the isthmus, but landing in San Francisco sick, he started home after two weeks, taking the same route, and after enduring many hardships, arrived safely.

He came to St. Anthony, now Minneapolis, in 1854 and became a partner in the Minnesota Flouring Mill with his brother. Here he remained a partner until 1858, when he sold out and formed a partnership with Paris Gibson, and built the first flour mill on the west side, which they named the Cataract Mills. It was a five run stone mill, and soon the "Cataract" brand of flour had a great reputation. In a few years Eastman & Gibson built the North Star Woolen Mills on the west side. It became famous for its blankets, which always took first premium wherever exhibited. The North Star Woolen Mills still continue as one of the industries of Minneapolis.

Mr. Eastman built be first paper mill on the east side, in 1860, in partnership with Mr. Charles C. Secombe. He also built the first wheat elevator in the state, in 1866, at Washington Avenue and Ninth Avenue S. Messrs. Eastman and Gibson and G. H. Eastman built the Anchor Flouring Mill, a twelve run stone mill, the largest then in the city. This was traded to ex-Governor John S. Pillsbury for his wholesale hardware stock and business. The Anchor mill is now one of the Pillsbury plant. He also engaged in the lumber business, the firm being Eastman, Bovey & Co. They became large owners of pine lands and extensive manufacturers. Of this firm his brother-in-law, Mr. John DLaittre, and later his brother, H. D. Eastman, became partners. Mr. Eastman is still a large owner of timber lands in Washington.

In 1869 Mr. Eastman originated an enterprise which promised not only to add to his own fortune, but to greatly increase the upbuilding of Minneapolis as a manufacturing center. He had been the first to demonstrate on the west side that water power could be utilized by a system of tunneling, and had made available power and land that could not be otherwise used. Mills valued at not less than a half million dollars were then being operated by his system, which included the North Star Woolen Mills. As compensation for this work, the West Side Water Power Co. gave him a perpetual lease of 250 horse-power, which was afterwards utilized for the Anchor Mill. He now proposed to develop another power that would eclipse the already famous west side.

He purchased Nicollet Island, a large tract of land lying in the river just above St. Anthony Falls, containing forty acres. He designed to have the south part covered with mills and factories. To supply water power to these, he organized the Tunnel Company, which built a tunnel about 2,500 feet long. The tunnel was 6x6 feet, and was to act as a tail race for the factories which were to be built over it. Enthusiasm for this great work began to spread, and Mr. Eastman was regarded as a public benefactor and the founder of a great manufacturing nucleus. B ut - "The best-laid schemes o' mice and men Gang aft agley, An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain For promised joy."

On October 4, 1869, the workingmen in the tunnel struck a spring or seam in the sandstone, which opened the passage from the bottom of the river into the tunnel. Volumes of water forced the workmen to withdraw. The tunnel was converted into an underground river, and an immense maelstrom appeared not far from the west shore of Nicollet Island. It was plain that the erosion of the water would ruin the falls and totally destroy the island. A general alarm was sounded, and the entire population of the city rushed to the island. Thousands of men and scores of teams were volunteered to stop the gap. Several methods were tried, but were unsuccessful. At the time, Mr. Eastman was East, and received telegrams stating the particulars of the calamity. He replied that the only way to stop it was by means of cofferdams, and on the morning of the 6th this method was commenced. This was the beginning of a mighty struggle between the city and the United States on one side and the Mississippi river on the other. It was a struggle of ten years, such as the people of Holland wrestled with the North Sea. It was a fight for existence - a struggle in which Minneapolis fought for its future greatness. In money it cost $879,500, and in brain energy untold work. To Mr. Eastman credit may not only be given for suggesting the best method of stopping the first break, but also for conceiving the engineering idea of building an immense stone dike, which finally saved the immense water power of Minneapolis from destruction.

Hon. H. T. Welles, in his autobiography, says "The tunnel had been a blessing in disguise, and it revealed hidden dangers. Mr. W. Eastman, with the best of intentions, had been unwittingly a great benefactor to the community. Until he made that excavation no one knew of the percolating rivulets that were waiting only the slightest invitation to become gush torrents and vent the waters of the whole river through the soft sandstone under the limestone ledge which would fall into the chasrn, and instead of the falls, which would be no more, there would be miles of rapids extending to Anoka."

Mr. Eastman now turned his attention to improving Nicollet Island. It was platted, and on Eastman Avenue he built sixty fine stone tenement houses, part of which he has recently turned into flats. On the lower end of the island he built two long blocks, which he used factory for purposes. On Grove Street he built residence, one of the finest in the city, rounded by beautiful grounds. On the same street are the residences of his brothers, Hasket and George, and his sisters, Mrs. John De Laittre and Mrs. Secombe.

When the Northern Pacific Co. was begun, Mr. Eastman was one of the construction company that built the first section of that road, extending from Duluth to the Red River. This was completed in 1872.

Some years ago Mr. Eastman negotiated the sale of the East Side Water Power from Mr. Butterfield of New York to Mr. Jas. J. Hill of St. Paul, the consideration being $400,000. He received as commission for making this deal one of the best equipped sawmills on the falls, and also three mill sites with power. This power he transferred by cable to his factory buildings on the-lower end of Nicollet Island.

A few years ago Mr. Eastman formed a company that purchased the Consolidated Breweries of Minneapolis. The capitalization is $1,500,000, the breweries having an annual capacity of 500,000 barrels. He is now president of this company, and one of the largest stockholders. He organized the company that built the Syndicate block on Nicellet avenue, and had charge of its erection. It is one of the largest blocks in America, and is capitalized for $1,000,000. He is now president of this company, and also a large stockholder. He also built on his own account the Eastman block on Nicollet avenue. In recent years he has erected a large, magnificent hotel at Hot Springs, Arkansas, called the Hotel Eastman. It is one of the largest and best equipped in the country, and classed with the Ponce de Leon at Jacksonville.

Other lines of business he is at present engaged in may be mentioned: Sheep raising in Montana; the wholesale grocery house of Dunham & Eastman, one of the leading concerns of Minneapolis, and he is also general manager of the Island Power Company, with a capitalization of $140,000.

Mr. Eastman has persistently declined running for any political office, but has accepted reluctantly several. positions of trust, such as state prison commissioner, also director in several of the banks, and assignee in settling up some large estates. He has been a liberal contributor to public and private charities, but has always insisted that his name be withheld in connection with such contributions.

During his entire life he has never been blessed with vigorous health, and for many years it has been necessary to seek a residence in the south during the winter. Mr. Eastman married, in 1855, Susan Randall Lovejoy, and they have had three children, Fred W. Eastman, Ida May Eastman and Josie Belle Eastman.

Mr. and Mrs. Eastman have always borne a conspicuous part in the social life of Minneapolis, and their elegant home on Nicollet Island is often open for social entertainment. They are prominent members in the Church of the Redeemer, and liberal supporters of its religious work.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


Click to enlarge

EBERT, CONRAD, Conrad Ebert was born in the Maple Grove Township of the New Schwanden Area on Aug.11,
1867. He continued on with His Fathers farm and He married Minna Martha Eliese Cornelius
on May 29,1890.Minnie was born on Aug.31,1866. There were 3 children born of this union 
1.Infant son 1894, 2. Albert Carl 1894, 3. Oscar George Ebert 1898. Minnie died on May 2,
1934 of ill health, and Conrad lived the rest of His life on the farm & Conrad died on Jan.27,
1950.They are both buried at the American-Lutheran Cemetery at Osseo, MN.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 325

EBERT, Fredrick was born in Germany, 1816, came to Illinois in 1817. Married October 10th, 1848, to Julia Ostrath, of Macon county, Illinois, and lived there eighteen years. Came to Hennepin county, in 1864. Have eleven children: John, Frederick, Margaret, George, Julia, Adam, Henry, Susan, Charles, Conrad and Willie. (See also below)

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co. (See also above)

Page 325

   
EBERT, Frederick & Julia
settled on a farm in Waterloo, IL.   Martini Cemetery was started on the West Side of Frederick & Julia's farm.   Frederick & Julia donated land from their farm in Waterloo, IL to St. Paul's Church of Christ, German Evangelical Lutheran Church.   Sold farm in Waterloo, IL on March 5, 1863, and moved to Minnesota. They settled on a farm outside of Osseo, MN (near Mud Lake).   Frederick Ebert's farm was passed on to Conrad Ebert, then Oscar Ebert.   The farm is now part of the Elm Creek Park Reserve in Maple Grove (on Territorial Road).   Both Frederick & Julia are buried in American-Lutheran Cemetery in Maple Grove, MN. This cemetery is located adjacent to the cemetery of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Osseo, MN    Little tidbits of information recalled by members of the Ebert Family Tree.
Updated: 5/29/99   1.  Robert Ebert - Grandfather George Ebert was standing below electrical power pole watching man install electrical lines for new Rural Electrification Program, when a wrench was dropped on his head causing a cut and bleeding.  After a patch-up he was fine.   2.  Robert Ebert - Grandfather George Ebert was in the screen porch on the old homestead house when lightening hit nearby knocking him to the floor.  He got up apparently not seriously hurt.   3.  Alvin Ebert - Grandfather George Ebert  peeling apples with his jackknife.  Starting at one end and making a complete coil until finished.  Apparently good eyesight as never wore glasses.  
Page 1 of 2   4.  Alvin Ebert - Grandfather George Ebert  seemed most content when doing daily chores which included, daily stripping cows after being milked by machine, daily tending to the hogs, and working with team of horse on jobs such as cultivating row corn with single row cultivator.   5.  Alvin Ebert - Father Alfred Ebert - only plug tobacco ever chewed regularly - "Yankee Girl"   6.  Alvin Ebert - Grandmother Emma (GIESE) Neuman - Always had a hollow chocolate candy for each of us (Russell & Alvin) when we visited as small kids.   7. Alvin Ebert - Mother Lillian Ann (NEUMAN) EBERT - Told me I have to either give up my trap line (Muskrat & Mink) or move out and live in the barn.  I was about 13 then.  Accidently caught a skunk in the trap.  Decided to give up the then lucative trap line since those Minnesota winters got pretty cold.   8.  Fredrick Ebert was born in Germany, 1816, came to Illinois, Married Oct 10, 1848 to Julia Ostath of Macon Co., Illinois and lived there 18 years.  Came to Hennepin Co., Minnesota in 1864.  They have 11 children.   John, Frederick, Margaret, George, Julia, Adam, Henry, Susan, Charles, Conrad & Wille. 
 
(Above data copied from: History - Hennepin County, Minnesota 1881 - Maple Grove - Biographical - North Star Pub.) Provided by Inez (Ebert) Koehler  9.  Adolph & Nell Ebert married Aug. 22, 1911.  Adolph & Nell farmed in Hennepin Co., 9 yrs.  Moved to Cramer, MN in 1920, logging business.  Bought a home out-side of Two Harbors, MN in 1941., lived there and alway had a lovely vegetable garden.  Featured "Eberts Acres" at fair in Two Harbors for many years.   Provided by Inez (Ebert) Koehler 

Additional info may be obtained by contacting - Alvin G. Ebert - ALEBERT@AOL.COM  

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com


Click to enlarge


EBERT, OSCAR Oscar George Ebert was born in the New  Schwanden area of Maple Grove Township Jul.31,
1898 and continued on with farming the land of His Father Conrad Ebert and grandfather  
Frederick Ebert. He married Mathilde (Tillie) Amelia Marie  Schmidt on Nov.20,1924 daughter
of Herman and Amelia Bucholz Schmidt. Mathilde was born on May 8,1904 in Hennepin
County. Mathilde died on Sep.29,1978 and Oscar died at Elk River, MN on Nov.11,1983.They
are both buried in the St. Fridolin  Cemetery, New Schwanden, Champlin, MN. There were 7
children born of this union. 1.Wesley 1926, 2.infant about 1927, 3.Elizabeth Esther 1929, 4.
Lorna Helen 1931, 5.James Cornelius 1934, 6.Mary Ruth 1936,  7.Kenneth Arnold 1941.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 542

EDDY, E. W. a native of Brunswick, New York, was born June 28th, 1826. He went to Albany and remained two years, then removed to St. Paul and remained in the livery business there until 1861, when he came here and in 1864 sold out; then he passed three years lumbering, and in 1867 returned to the livery business. He built the stable he now occupies in 1878; it is located on Third street between Nicollet and First Avenue south. Mr. Eddy married Julia Groff in 1849; she died in 1869, leaving two children, Melford and Carrie: he was married the second time in 187 2, to Anna Walch.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 326

EDDY, John M. is a native of New Haven, Vermont. When twenty-two years old, he went to California, and stayed about five years. In 1856 he came to Minnesota, and settled in Maple Grove. He was married in 1857, to Mary E. Evans, of Chittenden county, Vermont. They have five children. Mr. Eddy was the first town clerk, and held the office nine years. He enlisted in the Second Minnesota Cavalry, December 22d, 1863, was discharged December 2d, 1865, and has been farming since that time.

 

EDSALL, Bishop Samuel Cook D.D. (1860-1917) was consecrated as the missionary bishop of North Dakota in 1899. Dr. Edsall was the founder and first rector of St. Peter's church, Chicago, Illinois. After his consecration, Bishop Edsall spent three years in the North Dakota diocese, and then, at the request of Bishop Henry Benjamin Whipple (1822-1901), accepted election as coadjutor bishop of Minnesota. Bishop Edsall, in 1902, became bishop of Minnesota at the Episcopal Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour in Faribault, Minnesota. Samuel Cook Edsall, although Whipple's successor, centered his work in Minneapolis rather than at Faribault, where Whipple was buried. The Episcopal Church continued to recognize the Episcopal Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour in Faribault as the "Bishop's Church," however, until 1941, when St. Mark's, Minneapolis, became the cathedral for the Minnesota Diocese.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 542

EDSTEN, A. H. a native of Sweden, was born in 1837. He emigrated to America in 1864, and located at Chicago, where he was first engaged as cabinet-maker, and afterward was employed on the wood-work in car-shops; he remained there about two and one-half years, and came to Minneapolis May 5th, 1867. He worked in car-shops until he established himself in the furniture business in 1871.

 

From the Franklyn Curtiss-Wedge's "History of Fillmore County" [Chicago, IL;
1912], page 751. Submitted by Kay Ehlers
kehlers@attglobal.net

EGGLESTON, MARVIN a valiant officer of the Civil War, a former law-maker of Minnesota, a for many years a prominent merchant in Wykoff, was born in Floyd, Oneida county, [New York], September 5, 1839, son of Nelson and Livonia (Jacobs) Eggleston, the former of whom died in 1852 and the latter in 1884. When quite young he was taken by his parents to Holland Patent, N. Y., and at the age of sixteen learned the trade of carriage and sign painter. Subsequently her entered the seminary at Whitestown, N. Y., and graduated in 1861, after which he devoted one year to clerking a store. In the summer of 1862, the war having broken out, Mr. Eggleston, fired with the zeal of youth and ardent patriotism, enlisted in Company D. One Hundred Forty-sixth New York Volunteer Infantry. He showed his valor at the great battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run and Petersburg, and in fact, saw active service in all thecampaigns, skirmishes and engagements in which his regiment participated, until the end of the war. December 25, 1862, having already achieved the rank of first sergeant, he was promoted to second lieutenant. January 10, 1863, he was made first lieutenant. Still retaining that rank, he was made regimental quartermaster, October 27, 1863. He was brevetted captain, March 13, 1865, and on July 10, of that year, was discharged with the full rank of captain. After visiting a while with friends in New York state, he came west in the fall of 1865, and clerked two years in Chatfield. In 1867 he formed a co-partnership with his brother, D. J. Eggleston, and engaged in the general mercantile business in Fillmore village. In 1871 they purchased a corner lot in the village of Wykoff, erected a building and opened and conducted the first general store in the village. In 1875 the subject of this sketch moved his family to Wykoff and established his abode there. In 1879 he purchased his brother's interest in the business, and has since conducted the business, and has since conducted the business along, being very successful in building up a large trade and in winning and retaining the esteem and respect of the community. In 1906 Mr. Eggleston sold his home at Wykoff and purchased a beautiful residence at Lake Harriet, near Minneapolis. He expects soon to retire, and to take up his permanent residence with his family there. Aside from building up a successful business, Mr. Eggleston has taken an interest in public affairs, and has served his community in the legislature, being a member of the lower house in 1871. He married Hannah Jones, in June, 1869, and this union has been blessed with six children : Willis J., Lillis S., Oliver J., Marvin J., Harriet L., and Paul. Mrs. Eggleston has taken great pride in the education of his children. All are graduates of Spring Valley high school. The sons are graduates of the Minnesota State University, one of the daughters of the Minnesota State Normal School at Winona, and one of the Carlton College, at Northfield. Willis J. lives in Helena, Mont. He is an attorney for the United States government in its reclamation work. Lillis is the wife of Dr. John C. Farmer, of McKinley, Minn. Oliver J., is a mining engineer at Kennett, Cal., where he is resident engineer or the Mammoth Copper Mining Co. Marvin J., after being with the Security Bank of Minneapolis for four years, is now auditor for the Gold Medal Flour Co., of Minneapolis. Harriet is now Mrs. Frank P. Botsford, of Biwabik, Minn., her husband being a mining engineer and superintendent of the Bangor mine. Paul died in September, 1884, when but an infant.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 542

EICHELZER, P. F. was born near Heidelberg, Germany, October 7th, 1850. When two Years of age he came with his parents to America and, settled in New Orleans: removed to La Fayette, Indiana, in 1855, and in 1872 he came to this city, and entered his present business as hatter and furrier, with J. S. Sneddy for partner. Mr. Eichelzer had nine years experience in this business while at La Fayette. He married Louise B. Gregory, September 1st, 1874. They have one child, Hattie G.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 244

EIDAM, Edward A. born in Germany 1839. Came to America when young, and moved from place to place. In 1853 came to Fillmore county, Minnesota. Lived there five years, then moved to Decorah, Iowa, and went to school. Married Susan Bender, December 31, 1860. In 1867 came to Minneapolis. Lived there a year, then moved to Minnetonka, and worked at coopering till 1877, when he opened the store now owned by him. He has three children now living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 348

EKES, Martin a native of Germany, was born in 1834. He received his education in the schools of that country, and was by occupation a farmer. In 1853, he came to America and lived four years in New York city, being engaged as coachman; while in that city, he married Miss Catherine Gerard. They are the parents of two children. Mr. Ekes came to Minneapolis in 1858, and has since resided here; he has a vegetable garden of fifteen acres on Hennepin Avenue, where he also raises all varieties of strawberries; he was the first man to sell vegetables in this market.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

ELLIOT, Charles J. a native of Canada, was born December 25th, 1848. He came to this city in the summer of 1871 and worked at his trade of miller until 1872, when he commenced in business and continues very successfully, as dealer in fruits, confectionery, oysters, ice cream, etc., at 727 Washington Avenue south. Mr. Elliot married in 1875, Dora Tool of Minneapolis.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

ELLIOT, D. was born December, 1828, in Penobscot county, Maine. In 1852, he went to California and was interested in mining until the winter of 1854, when he returned to Maine, and the following spring came here and preempted a farm of 180 acres where his present residence is, 1415 Sixth Avenue south; for five or six years he was engaged in gardening. In May, 1862 he went to Montana but returned in 1864 and for a time carried on a grocery business. Mr. Elliot's wife was Marietta Smyth, of Maine. They have one child, Etta.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

ELIOTT, Wyman was born in Penobscot county, Maine, May 19th, 1834. He came to Minneapolis in 1854, and has been closely identified with the growth and prosperity of the city; he has had the advantage of witnessing its advancement in every direction, and has thus become well acquainted with its history and early settlers. He passed his first year in Minnesota on a claim near Monticello; he is one of the pioneer farmers and market-gardeners of this county. He has a pleasant home at the corner of Tenth street and Ninth Avenue south. Mr. Eliott was married November 25th, 1868, to Mary Ella Chase, of this city. They have two children, Sarah and Jenella.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 244

ELLINGWOOD, Fernando was born in Maine, October 27, 1840. Lived there twenty years then came to St. Anthony. From there to Anoka where he lived ten years. 1865 went to Lake George and built a planing lath and shingle mill. Run it for three years, and in 1868 sold out; moved to Spencer Brook, Isanti county. Bought a saw mill, and in 1870, built a grist mill. Is now sole proprietor. It was the first mill in that county. Was postmaster five years, and county commissioner three. Married, November 30, l859, Ellen Carson. Have three children living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

ELLIS, B. R. born October 19th, 1835, at Nantucket, Massachusetts. In early life he went to northern New York, and at the age of seventeen commenced to learn carpentering. In 1862 he removed to Iowa and remained six years, then returned to New York. After a residence of four years there and one year in Canada he went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In the spring of 1874 he came to Minneapolis and has since been engaged in business here; the firm at present is Ellis and Huff, carpenters, builders and jobbers, 305 Second Avenue south. Mr. Ellis was married October 19th, 1854, to Miss Spears, who died in 1862, leaving two children; his second wife was Mary Mead, who has borne him two daughters.

 

Information gleaned from Civil War Regiment History for the "19th Independent Battery Light Artillery New York Volunteers"

ELLIS, ROBERT S. age 21, 5' 7" tall, light complexion, grey eyes, light hair, by occupation at enlistment a tailor. He was born at Bethany, NY approx. 1842. He enlisted at Alabama, NY, Dec 28, 1863 and mustered in as a private on the same date in the 19th Independent Battery Light Artillery NY Volunteers for three years. He mustered out by disability discharge at Elmira, NY on May 11, 1864. Before his service he married Bessie Tomlinson (born 1839 approx. in England) Nov 15, 1861 at Wales, NY, she died 3-2-1895 at Minneapolis, Minn. They had at least four children; Charles R. born 05-30-1864, Samuel F. 07-18-1867, Mary 06-14-1869, and Kitty A.M. 06-14-1869. He was discharged from the service for disability (typhoid fever, total blindness). He lived in South Alabama, NY following discharge from the service and then went west to Minneapolis, Minn. where he married on 3-2-1899 Annie Lyford b. Exter, NH following the death of his first wife. He and Annie were married by a Baptist minister by the name of W. B. Riley of Minneapolis, Minn. Annie died 11-20-1935 at Eitel Hospital, Minneapolis, Minn. Robert died 2-06-1904 at Minneapolis, Minn and was buried in Lakewood, Minneapolis, Minn. cemetery.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 282

ELLSWORTH, David was born in Chenango county, New York, July 28, 1820. In 1836 he moved to Syracuse, where he learned the tanner's trade, following it for some time. He then embarked in the mercantile business, until 1867, when he came to Minnesota, and settled on the land he now occupies. October 7, 1845, he married Miss Caroline Wales, who died May 22, 1849, leaving two children, Mary and Caroline. The latter died in infancy. His second wife was Miss Euphemia Stevens. Martha A., Margaret D., Ameliaa B., Frederick J., George W., David F. and Edward H., are children by second marriage.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

ELWELL, James T. was born July 2d, 1855, at St. Anthony, Minnesota. He moved with his parents to Granite City and thence to St. Cloud, where he remained until 1864, then removed to Cottage Grove. In 1874 he came here and established the business of manufacturing spring beds. Mr. Elwell is a young man of energy and perseverance, and is meeting with deserved success; a description of his business will be found in this work among the manufactures of the city.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

EMERSON, Seth was born at Deer Isle, Maine, in 1834. Twenty-three years of his life were passed on the sea; he commenced before the mast and worked his way up to Captain. In 1870, he came to Minnesota and located at Wolls, remained only two years, then came to Minneapolis and engaged in carpenter work. He is now a member of the farm of Galpin and Emerson, carpenters, builders and jobbers; they employ eighteen men, and their principal business has been building residences. Mr. Emerson was married in 1864 to Miss Whitney. Their residence is 923 Twenty-first Avenue south. They have had five children, only two of whom are living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 300

EMERY, Colby one of the oldest settlers in Champlin, was born in 1822, in Oxford county, Maine, where he resided, with the exception of some time passed in the hotel business in Boston and New York, until 1853, when he came to Minnesota. He at once preempted a claim of 160 acres, and has since resided in this town engaged in farming. He now owns 120 acres of fine land. He was married, July 2,1855, to Ruth Blaisdell, of Tamworth Iron Works, Carroll county, New Hampshire. She died, January 1875. The family record is, James R. born in 1856; Charles B., 1857; Zenus B. 1863, died 1870; Anna G., born 1869.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

EMERY, George W. M.D. was born at Toronto, Canada, May 21st, 1841. He received his education in the schools of that city; Knox college and Model school. He studied medicine at the University of Tronto, at Bellevue hospital medical college, and in 1865, graduated from the Berkshire medical college of Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He practiced in Illinois eight years, and four years in Wisconsin. In May, 1877, he came to Minneapolis and has since followed his profession here. He is physician to the Bethany Home, and is medical examiner for the New England Mutual, New York Life and Hartford Continental Insurance companies. Dr. Emery was married in 1861 to Miss Hall, of Philadelphia, who died in 1862; in 1864, he married Matilda Fairfield, of Toronto, Canada. They have one child, Bertha. Dr. Emery is a member of the Peoria county, Illinois medical society, and of the Minnesota state medical society.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 543

EMMANS, N. H. a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, was born January 19th, 1854. He grew to manhood with his parents on a farm and attended the public schools at home, also Starkey Seminary, at Eddytown, New York. He came to this city in 1875, and two years later entered the Boston one price clothing store, where by energy and strict attention to business, he has gained the entire confidence of his employers, and now has charge of the merchant tailoring department.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 244

EMPENGER, Joseph H. was born in Bohemia January 19th, 1847, and came with his parents to America, in 1858, settling in Minnetonka township, where he has followed farming. He held the office of assessor for six successive years, ending in 1878. Was elected justice in 1879, and held through the following term, on account of his successor failing to qualify. He married Anna Miller, November 22, 1871. She was born in Bohemia in 1849. They have four children: Emily E., Edward, Anna and Joseph.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 544

ENDE, August was born in Germany, in 1829, and emigrated to America in 1847. He lived at Baltimore, Maryland, the first year then removed to St. Louis, Missouri; thence to Freeport, Illinois, where for two years he was in the hotel business. In 1855, he came to St. Anthony and continued the same business until 1863; he then moved to this side of the river, bought and enlarged the Farmer's hotel, and has since kept the house. He married Miss Amelia Rey, at St. Louis in 1853. They have nine children, Louisa, Edward, Bertha, Charles, Adolph, Amelia, Emma Anna and Julius.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 305

ENGEL, Nicholas was born in Prussia, in 1820. Learned the trade of shoemaking. He was drafted into the army at twenty, and served two years. He emigrated to America in 1852, and settled at Port Washington, Wisconsin, working at Ms trade. Moved to Plattsmouth, Nebraska, in 1858, and followed his trade. In 1875, went to Frankfort, Wright county, and in 1876 came to Dayton. Has held the office of Justice of the Peace for two years. Married, in 1863, to Catharine Schluentz. They have had five children, four are now living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 544

ENGER, Henry a native of Norway, was born February 19th, 1847. He emigrated to America in 1869, and located in Wisconsin, where for three years he was in the saloon business; in 1873 he came to Minneapolis, passed eighteen months in a hotel, and three years in the North Star Laundry. Since that time he has been in the restaurant business. He married Miss Lena Olsen in 1876. They have one child: Mary.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 544

ENGLESTED, C. O. was born in Norway, in 1851. In 1868 he came to the United States, and passed two years in farming, at Rushford, Minnesota; he came here in 1872, and for four years worked about the lumber mills; in 1876 he started in the saloon business at 117 Washington Avenue south, and in April, 1880, moved to No. 1201. He was married in 1878, to Laura Egstrom, who has borne him one child, Harry J.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 544

ERB, Samuel was born in Canada, January 26th, 1852. He came to Minneapolis in 1870, and the year following went to work at the Goodnow and Hawly lumber mill, where he had charge of the scaling department two years; since 1873 he has had the management of the mill. Mr. Erb's wife was Catherine Hoben; they were married June 30th, 1874, and reside at 112 Fourth Avenue north. Their children are Mary, who died at the age of one and one-half years, William and Samuel.

 

Submitted by great-great granddaughter, Claudia Schuman, from genealogical resesarch and family knowledge.


(click for large image)

ERICKSON, Lars, arrived in America on September 13, 1853, according to his application for naturalization. He was born in Norway on July 9, 1829. His death certificate states he was the son of Eric Jensrud. However, no further information has been found on his parents or his place of birth in Norway.

He came to Minneapolis, which was at that time still St. Anthony, some time between 1853 and 1855. He was married to Troen Jonsdatter in St. Paul on January 4, 1855, daughter of John and Betsy Peterson. Their first child, Josephine, was most likely born in Minneapolis in 1857, and in 1858 they moved to Carver County, Minnesota. Lars purchased 160 acres of land in Dahlgren Twp. In 1858 the East Union Lutheran Church was formed and Lars and Troen were one of the first families to join. Also, listed in the first book of members was an Arne Erickson, who was also from Norway. It's believed that Arne may have Lars' brother, but I have been unable to find documentaion to prove it.

Around 1866 the family left Carver county and returned to Minneapolis where Lars established the "Scandia House", a boarding house located on 3rd Ave and 2nd St. This boarding house was generally frequented by newly arriving Scandinavians coming into the city. At this time there were no Norwegian churches in Minneapolis and all Scandniavians attended the Swedish churches. Meetings began being held in the Scandia House, as well as Sunday Services, to form a new church. In 1869 the Trinity Lutheran Church was formed, with Rev. Ole Paulson delivering the first sermon. Rev. Paulson had been former neighbors of the Ericksons in Carver County.

By 1869 the Scandia House had either been sold or closed and Lars worked at other various occupations until 1878 when they moved to Redwood County MN. Lars filed for a homestead in Gales Township near the town of Walnut Grove. For the next few years he farmed and made improvements on the land as was required for 5 years. On December 3, 1882 Troen passed away after having contracted Tuberculosis. She was buried on the farm of a neighbor, Lars Pederson. Two children of the Pedersons were also buried nearby.

Lars remained on the farm in Gales, receiving title to it on September 17, 1883. He had fullfilled the requirements of the Homestead Act of 1862 by building a house (14 x 20 feet and a 9 x 10 addition), a granery, stable, and planting trees valued at $300.00. He cultivated 60 acres of the 80.

In 1885 Lars married a widow from Sweden, Mrs. Hanna Lindstrom, who had one child from her previous marriage. She had come to America with her first husband and settled on a farm near Walnut Grove in Springdale twp. Her husband, John Lindstrom, had died the same year as Troen, and according to information provided by her descendants, Lars and Hanna married more for convienience and had a legal arrangement regarding their property and assests to protect their children. Lars moved into Hanna's home in Springdale and Lars' son John ran the family farm in Gales twp. Lars also had income from his work as a salesman, or "peddler" as they were referred to then. Hanna had income from her farm.

Lars Erickson passed away on March 8, 1899 from Stomach Cancer and was buried in the Swedish Lutheran Cemetery in Walnut Grove. The headstone has both Lars' and Troen's names on it, but there is no evidence that her body was ever removed to the cemetery. Hanna died May 3, 1918 was buried next to her first husband, John Lindgren.

Mention of Lars' death was published in the Walnut Grove newspaper:

Lars Erickson's death occurred Wednesday morning from cancer of the stomachs. He was formerly of this town.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 544

ESSENE, T. J. was born in Sweden, February 26th, 1853. He came to America in 1863, and lived in Chicago until 1866, when he removed to this city; he was employed by Thompson and Wiggin until 1870, when he went into the meat business, and since 1877 has kept a market in partnership with Mr. Hopper. Mr. Essene's wife was Annie Mersen, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; she has borne him two children, only one is living, a girl born in 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 355

ESTES, Charles was born in the town of Cornish, York county, Maine, April, 1835. He engaged in railroad business in Massachusetts for a time, and in 1853 moved with his parents to Minnesota. He located at Anoka, and helped build the first mill-dam at that place. He eventually came to St. Anthony, which is still his home. His father is living with him a vigorous old gentleman eighty-seven years of ago. Charles Estes enlisted in the Ninth Minnesota Infantry, and served three years. He is one of the old settlers, and has a fine place. The first brick made in this country were manufactured on his farm. His wife was Mrs. Julia Estes, whom he married in 1872. They have three children living.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 544

EUSTIS, J. M. was born in Oxford county, Maine, December 15th, 1827. In 1857 he removed to Minneapolis, and with his own hands cleared away the hazel brush and threw up the first dirt for the Nicollet House, which was completed, furnished and opened May 1858; during the hard times of 1857, he was advised by some of the leading men here, to abandon the enterprise, but with his pluck and perseverance he carried it through to successful completion, and then disposed of his interest to Gilson Brothers. At the commencement of the rebellion he made a contract with the Government to feed all the Minnesota soldiers for thirty-seven cents each per day; he also supplied the army under General Sibley, during the war upon the frontier, after the Indian massacre. At the same time he was engaged in the lumber business with W. E. Jones and Company, for about five years, then built a block on Hennepin Avenue. He, in company with others, selected the site for a fair ground, laid out a track, erected buildings and put everything in good order for the purpose. Mr. Eustis has been a contractor on the Northern Pacific railroad; and was in the employ of the St. Louis railroad company for several years, until in the fall of 1880, he was elected sheriff of Hennepin county for two years.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 544

EVANS, O. J. M.D. was born in Oneida county, New York, February 5th, 1840. He was educated at the academy of Rome, in his native state, and studied medicine with Dr. Armsby, professor of anatomy at the Albany Medical College, also with Dr. Virgil of Rome, New York. After completing the regular courses of lectures at the Albany College, he graduated from that institution in 1862, receiving the degree of M. D. Dr. Evans was commissioned as assistant surgeon of the Fortieth New York Infantry, in 1862, and in 1864 was promoted to first surgeon. He was also medical director of the department of Farmville, Virginia, and was placed on the operating board of surgeons, holding both positions until the close of the war. He was mustered out of service in July, 1865, came to this city, and has since practiced medicine here, his office being at 22 Hennepin Avenue. He is president of the Hennepin County Medical Association, a member of the State Medical Society, and president of the Minneapolis Board of Health, this being his second term. He also served one term in the City Council. Dr. Evans was married in 1869, to Elizabeth Dodge, who died in January, 1879. She was a daughter of Colonel John Dodge, of Princeton, Illinois.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 326

EVANS, W. E. was born in Chittenden county, Vermont, December 28th, 1824. He remained there, working as millwright, until he came to Minnesota; was one of the fast settlers of Maple Grove, and built the first house on this road, a log cabin, now used as a granary. Before his block-house was finished, he covered it with blankets to protect his family. In 1847 he was married to Miss Lucia C. Austin, of Vermont; she died in 1880. Mr. Evans has held various town offices since he came here.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.

Page 545

EVERARD, John R. a native of Liverpool, England, was born in June, 1828. While there he learned the tailor's trade. In July, 1878, he came to Minneapolis, and locating at 213 Hennepin Avenue, established a merchant tailoring business, in which he invested a capital of seven thousand dollars. He employs fourteen men in his manufacturing department, which is still located at 213 Hennepin Avenue, but in November, 1878, he removed his place of business to 10 Washington Avenue south.

 

History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing Co.
Page 218

EWING, William M. was born in Canada in 1816. Learned the trade of wagon maker, and served the government during the rebellion in Canada. In 1848, removed to New York; remained one year; thence to Michigan. In 1851 he came to Minnesota, assisted in the survey of Maple Grove township, and in naming it. In 1857 he removed to Osseo, and was the first secretary of the corporation. In 1862 he removed to a farm in the town of Brooklyn, and resided there eight years. He enlisted in Company C of the Mounted Rangers, serving as clerk in the Quartermaster's department, until the company was disbanded. Was married in 1840, to Myra Rogers; by her he had five children, two of whom are now living. He has been married three times; has four children living, Charles Arkland, Alice Myra, Francis Cordelia and Mary Adelma.