Make your own free website on Tripod.com
SURNAME
W

Use Windows "Find" feature to locate surnames on the page (Ctrl & F)

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 284

WAGNER, Leonard was born in Prussia in 1822. In 1848 he emigrated to America, came to Wisconsin and worked in a saw mill. In 1852 removed to St. Anthony, remained there one year, then went to Crystal Lake. Mrs. Wagner was the first white woman in that vicinity. In 1852 Mr. Wagner was married to Margaret Bauenfeind. They have eight children: Maggie, Elizabeth, Heinrich, Eldena, Eleanora, George, Edwin and Adelia.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 652

WALES, Arthur of the firm of Wales Brothers, was born in Tennessee, in l855. Phillip was born at Baltimore, in 1857. They came to Minneapolis in 1869 and in 1876 commenced the manufacture of cabinet organs. In the fall of 1877 they built their first pipe organ, it is now in use at the Gethsemane Church; in 1880 they made the second; that went to Carver county. William Wales, the father of these gentlemen, was a prominent man of Baltimore, and at the opening of the war, was editor of the Baltimore American.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 652

WALES, C. E. was born at St. Anthony, October 4th, 1851. At the age of twelve he began his business career as agent for the St. Paul Pioneer and St. Paul Press, there being at that time no daily paper printed at either St. Anthony or Minneapolis; he continued that business for several years, at the same time attending school. In l869 he entered the employ of J. A. Armstrong, his being the first coal and wood yard in the city; he remained with him about five years and then established himself in the same business. Two years from that time, the different fuel companies of St. Paul and Minneapolis were merged into one under the name of North-western Fuel Company. Mr. Wales was cashier until the death of Mr. Armstrong, since then he has been agent. He married Hattie Raymond, in 1879 ; she has borne him one child, Marie.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 293

WALES, W.W. Jr. was born in North Carolina, in 1828. He moved with his parents to Wayne county, Indiana, and when nine years of age, removed to Hancock county, thence to Henry county, where they remained seven years; then returned to Hancock county and remained five years. In 1853 he came to Hennepin county, and took a claim in Brooklyn township and has since resided here. In 1861 he was married to Miss Sarah E. Gant. They have two children, Flora Helen and Laura Elvina.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 652

WALES, William W. was born March 14th, 1818, in Iredell county, North Carolina. In 1845, removed to Greensburg, Indiana, and taught school in that place for a time; then engaged in the book and stationery business. In 1851 he came to St. Anthony and occupied himself in gardening about three years, after which he again went in the book trade. Mr. Wales connection with local politics has been important; he held the office of city clerk three years, was postmaster two years during President Lincoln's administration, and was twice mayor of St. Anthony; in 1856 he was a member of the territorial council, and the next year was sent by the society of Friends of Indiana, to assume charge of a colored orphan asylum in Mississippi, but failing health obliged him to return to Minneapolis. In 1868 he opened his present business of paper-hangings, window-shades, etc. Mr. Wales married Catherine Bundy in 1848. They have had eight children: Maria, Charles, Laura, William, Florence and Nettie are living. (SEE ALSO BELOW)

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

WALES, William W. was born in Iredell County, North Carolina, March 4, 1818. Removed to Greensboro, Indiana, in 1845. Was school teacher and afterwards druggist. In 1848 he married Katherine Bundy and came to Minnesota in 1851, locating at St. Anthony. He engaged in the book and stationary business which he conducted successfully for several years. In December, Mr. Wales, John H. Stevens, A. E. Ames, A. N. Hoyt, N. E. Stoddard and O. H. Kelly signed the call for the meeting held at St. Paul January 4, 1854, at which the Minnesota Agricultural Society was organized.

In 1857, Mr. Wales was elected mayor of St. Anthony, being the third mayor of the city and succeeding Alvaren Allen. In 1865 he was elected mayor for the second time. In January, 1857, he took his seat in the territorial legislature as the member of the Counsel from the Third Council District, which was the "precinct of the Falls of St. Anthony." In 1859 he was elected city clerk, which office he held continuously until August, 1863, when he was appointed postmaster of St. Anthony by President Lincoln, succeeding David Heaton. Mr. Wales was a member of the school board of St. Anthony for many years.

In all of the public positions to which he was elected or appointed he gave perfect satisfaction to the people of the city.

Since 1884 Mr. Wales has been engaged in missionary work, much of the time among the mountaineers of his native state, in accordance with cherished plans of his early life. Now, in his eighty-fourth year, he is in good health and quite active, residing at Asheville, North Carolina. (SEE ALSO ABOVE)

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALKE, C. B. a native of New York, was born in 1858. He came to Minneapolis in 1876, and two years later went in business, having bought out J. H. Heisser. He deals in scroll saws, scroll work, and all kinds of supplies in connection with the business; he is at No. 403 Nicollet Avenue.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALKER, F. C. was born at Otsego, New York, November 12th, 1829. He lived in his native place until the age of twenty-two, then went to Massachusetts and remained there in the boot and shoe trade until 1879, when he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and about six years was engaged in the manufacture of ladders and eave troughs; after residing two and one-half years in Indianapolis he came here; he does carpet cleaning, and manufactures ladders and the "Boss" washing machine. He was married in 1859, to Miranda Morton; they have one child.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALKER, G. F. born in Scotland, June, 1859; he came to this country and helped dress the first stone used in the Cataract mill. He lived two years in Meeker county, then went to Scott county and leased a mill. In l864 he returned to Minneapolis and had charge of the Union mill one year; then in company with Thomas Noble built the People's mill and operated it four years; he next built the Washington mill at Dassel, and after running it four years, sold out, purchased the Delano mill and operated that about seven years, then returned to this city and has since worked at the Crown Roller mill. In 1861 he married Ann Robertson. Their children are: John, Nellie, Mary, Jessie, Minnehaha, Hattie and George.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALKER, J. C. a native of Canada, was born December 13th, 1842, at Cornwall. He came to the United States in the fall of 1862, and worked at the lumber business in Green Bay, Wisconsin, and Minneapolis, until June, 1879; the following spring he engaged in his present business, billiard hall and sample room at 103 Nicollet Avenue. In October, 1880, his marriage with Julia Monahan took place.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 652

WALKER, Thomas B. was born in Xenia, Green county, Ohio, February 1st, 1840. His father died in 1849, and in 1856 the family removed to Berea, where he aided in the support of the family, and secured the rudiments of an education. Having a taste for mathematics, he pursued the study of engineering, astronomy, calculus and Newton's "Principal" Mr. Walker came to Minnesota in 1862, during the Indian outbreak, and followed surveying, railroad engineering, and examining land and exploring until about 1873. In 1868 he combined with Dr. Levi Butler and H. W. Mills under the firm name of Butler, Mills and Walker, lumber manufacturers and dealers, continuing in the firm until 1876. During these years e was also interested in lands and logs with H. T. Welles, Franklin Steele, Major Camp, Herrick Bros., George Cleveland and others. In 1876, with George A. Camp, he purchased the Pacific mills of J. Dean and Company. This famous mill is described elsewhere. In 1863 Mr. Walker was married to Miss Harriet G. Hulet of Berea, Ohio. They have seven children, two girls and five boys, all of whom are active, enterprising, rough and rugged. They are taught to play, hunt, fish, row boats etc. It was through Mr. Walker's influence that the Athenaeum was opened for the benefit of the public.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALL, Mrs. John came to Minneapolis in 1864, and has been ten years in the hotel business. Since February, 1877, she has been in the Wall House at 17 and 19 Second street north; it is a three story brick house owned by Henry Oswald.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 277

WALSH, E. F. born in Nova Scotia, in 1827. He settled in Hennepin county in 1856, and took a claim where he now lives. Married in 1855, to Mary Gilman. They have six children, Lahelia, Burke, J. D., Ida May, Eda Mary and Frank.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALSH, Matthew, born in Ireland, June 15th, 1841. He emigrated to the United States in 1861, and located at New York city; during one season he was employed on a merchant steamer, running between New York and New Orleans. In 1865 he removed to this city, and has since that time been at the Cataract mill, with the exception of one year with Judd and Brackett. He has been head miller at the Cataract since 1871. In 1864 he married Annie Stacy, who has borne him seven children, Walter, Edward, Margaret, Alice, May, Katie and Julia.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALTER, John was born in 1831, in Switzerland. He graduated in 1846, and then engaged in mercantile business three years in his native country. In 1849 he moved to New York, and the next year to Canada, where he taught school fifteen years; then returned to New York, and after teaching in that state one year, went to Illinois for three years, then to Sioux City, where he was assistant in the high school four years; at the expiration of that time, he came here, and after teaching two years, engaged in his present business. In 1854 he married Miss S. Smith. They have had fourteen children; the living are, Emma, Henry, Sidney, Gustavus. Minerva, John, Herman, Stella, Charles and Effie.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WALTON, Swan born December 20th, 1840, in Sweden. He passed about three years in Denmark; then returned to Sweden and engaged in milling. In 1868 he came to Minneapolis; was several years in the furniture business with W. F. Warner and also with Mr. McLean. In 1870 he was appointed on the police force, and two years later engaged in the grocery business under the firm name of Vanstrom and Walton. He was again appointed on the police force in 1878, and still holds the position. His wife was Annie Anderson, whom he married in 1868. They are the parents of five children: Frank, Annie, Nellie, Matilda and Mary.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 277

WAMBOLDT, A. W. born in Nova Scotia, in 1851. He moved to Hennepin county in 1863, and learned the cooper's trade in Minneapolis. He went to Florida, and lived two years, then returned to Medina, where he has since resided, excepting a short time in Meeker county. He was married in 1880, to Miss Ida M. Walsh.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 293

WARD, C. H. was born in Merrimac county, New Hampshire, in 1833. He moved to Hennepin county in 1854, and took a claim in Brooklyn; he now has two hundred acres. In 1875, he was elected county Commissioner, took his seat in 1876, and has held the office for five years; was also Assessor for three years. Married in 1855, to Mrs. M. A. Ward. They have two children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 653

WARNER, George F. a native of Schoharie county, New York, was born in 1828. At the age of sixteen he commenced in the furniture business, and continued. in this trade with success at Albany, New York, Buffalo and Chicago. He came to Minneapolis in June, 1857, and is the oldest established furniture dealer in the city. His places of business are numbers 325 Nicollet Avenue and 106 Washington Avenue south.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 654

WARNER, N. F. was born in 1848 in New York city. In 1851 he moved with his parents to Buffalo, New York, where they remained until 1855, and next lived two years in Chicago. Coming to Minnesota in 1857, they lived a while in Fairbault and then came to Minneapolis, where he has resided ever since with the exception of a short period. In 1869 Mr. Warner joined an exploring expedition up the Yellowstone in order to recruit his failing health; on his return to Minneapolis, he joined a surveying party up the Mississippi river and its tributaries. He there preempted one hundred and sixty acres of pine land, which he afterwards sold for $1,000. He then returned to Minneapolis and began in the undertaking business, in which he is still engaged. He was married in 1879 to Miss Elizabeth Sullivan, of Minneapolis. They have one child, a girl ten months old, who was adopted by the Minneapolis light Infantry as the "daughter of the regiments."

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 293

WARWICK, Thomas a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, was born December 26th, 1826. Moved with his parents to Nova Scotia, where he lived until seventeen years of age; was lumbering in New Brunswick two years, and in Penobscot three years. Went to St. Anthony, Minnesota, in 1850, coming to St. Paul by steamer from Dubuque, Iowa. On arriving at St. Paul, chartered a lumber wagon to bring himself and family to St. Anthony. He then went to exploring pine lands, and engaged in the lumber trade for seven years; was one season on Rum river, and two on the St. Croix and Chippewa, he now lives on a claim eight miles north of Minneapolis. Married Mary E. Smith.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 654

WASHBURN, John a native of Maine, was born in 1858, at Hallowell. He is a son of A. S. Washburn and nephew of C. C. and W. D. Washburn. In February, 1880, he came to Minneapolis, and commenced learning milling, with a view to making it his permanent business.

 

From "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", Collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voyageur Press Inc. Mpls. 1890. (Same as William Drew Washburn below).


(click for large image)

WASHBURN, W. D. Two members of the famous Washubrn family have been prominently identified with the growth of Minneapolis, Gov. C. C. Washburn, although a resident of another city and state, had very large and important interests in Minneapolis. The flour milling industry would not preent the mammoth proportions it does and has for years but for his investment of money and energy here. It is true of that and many other interestes, which have made Minneapolis great, that they would not have enjoyed such phenommenal growth but for the presence and tireless activity of William D. Washburn, the youngest of the seven sons of that worthy Main couple. It was in 1856, at the age of twenty-give, that young Washburn located in Minneapolis and continued the practive of law begun at the East. Not finding sufficient scope for his energies, at the end of two years he abandoned regular practive of the profession. For ten years he was the agent of the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad in 1869, and more recently the Minneapolis, St. Paul, Sault Ste. Marie & Atlantic, both enterprises of the first magnitude. He has recieved many political honors, served several termms in the State Senate, three in the lower house of Congress, and finally brings up in the Senate. He has won a national reputation, and his fellow-citizens are justly proud of him. Through it all he has never forgotten the interests of his native city, but devoted much time and money to its advancement. (SEE ALSO BELOW)

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing (same as W.D. Washburn above)

Page 654

WASHBURN, William Drew was born at Livermore, Androscoggin county, Maine, January 14th, 1831. His parents, Israel and Martha nee Benjamin, were lineal descendants of the old Mayflower stock; the Benjamin family were of Scottish extraction. Until the age of twenty he lived on the farm with his father, and attended school winters; he studied at Gorman Academy, also at South Paris, and finally completed his preparatory studies at Farmington Academy. In 1854 he graduated from Bowdoin College; having taught winters, and worked vacations to defray his expenses; during one of these vacations he was clerk in the house of representatives, under General Cullom. After graduating he studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1857; the same year he came to this city, and was appointed agent of the Minneapolis Mill Company, in which he afterward became a partner. In 1861 he was commissioned by President Lincoln, surveyor general of Minnesota, and removed to St. Paul. At the close of his term of office he returned to this city, built a large saw-mill, and has since been actively engaged in the lumber trade. He was the chief mover in projecting the Minneapolis & St. Louis railway, the success of which is largely due to his enterprise; he is president of the company and one of the largest stock owners in the corporation, has also been interested in other railroads. In 1872 he built the finest lumber mill, in the state, at Anoka, and has since built a large flouring mill at the same place. In 1873, he, with others, built the Palisade mill, here; he is also one of the originators and stock- holders of the Minneapolis Harvester Works. Since becoming a resident of Minnesota, he has been an active participant of public enterprises; politically he has always been a republican. November, 1878, he was elected representative of the third congressional district by three thousand majority, and in 1880 re-elected by a majority of twelve thousand. In his religious belief he is a Universalist. He married in 1859, Lizzie Muzzy, of Bangor, Maine, who has born him eight children, two sons and two daughters are living. (SEE ALSO ABOVE)

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

WASHBURN, William Drew was born at Livermore, Me., Jan. 14, 1831. His ancestors were of Puritan stock, settling in Duxbury, Mass., in the early colonial period. He was the youngest member of the large Washburn family which was so prominent for half a century in the affairs of several states, as well as at the national capitol. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1854 and entered the law office of his brother Israel, afterwards studying law with Hon. J. A. Peters at Bangor. He came to Minneapolis May 1, 1857, and opened a law office but did not devote his entire time to his profession. In the fall of 1857 he was appointed secretary and agent of the Minneapolis Mill Company, then building the first dam on the west side of the river, which position he held for several years. In 1861 he was appointed surveyor general of Minnesota by President Lincoln, and the next four years his official duties required his presence at St. Paul. During this time be purchased, in association with others, large amounts of pine lands, and later erected saw mills and carried on for many years an extensive lumber business both at Minneapolis and Anoka. He was also engaged in the manufacture of flour in Minneapolis, and in 1880 built a large flouting mill at Anoka, which he operated until 1889 when the property was transferred to the Pillsbury-Washburn Milling Company, in which he has since been a stockholder and director.

Mr. Washburn was elected to congress in 1878 and re-elected in 1880, and again in 1882, serving six consecutive years. In 1889 he was elected United States Senator for the term of six years. During his term in congress, both in the house and senate, he represented his state faithfully and ably. He was largely instrumental in enlisting men and capital in building the Minneapolis & St. Louis, the Minneapolis & Duluth, and the "Soo" railways, and to his persistence in pushing these roads to completion is the City of Minneapolis indebted for much of its prosperity.

His beautiful home at "Fair Oaks" is one of the finest in the Northwest.

He was married to Miss Lizzie Muzzy, daughter of Franklin Muzzy of Bangor, Me., April 19, 1859. (SEE ALSO ABOVE)

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 654

WASHBURN, William P. a native of New Brunswick, was born in Northumberland county, February 10th, 1850. He came to Minneapolis December, 1874, and worked in the lumber business four years, on the boom in the summer and winters in the woods. September, 1878, he took an interest with T. G. Salisbury in the manufacture of mattresses. His marriage with Ida Rowe took place in November, 1876.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 268

WASHINGTON, George was born in Virginia, in 1843, and remained there until 1849, when he removed with his parents to Tennessee, and in 1863 came to Minnesota. He was married in 1879, to Phoebe Yancey, by whom he has one child, Willie, born, March 21st, 1880. Mr. Washington is engaged in farming, and is the owner of eighty acres of land on section fifteen.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 654

WATSON, John was born March 26th, 1830, in Somerset county, Maine. In 1851 he went to California, where he was mining and lumbering about five years, then returned to Maine and went into the tanning business. In 1861 he removed to Minnesota and engaged in railroad building. He has been connected with the interests of this city since 1864, and since 1872 has been an officer of the City Bank; he was vice-president five years, and in 1879 took charge of the Telephone Company as its general manager. Mr. Watson married, in 1856, Olive Thompson. Their children are: May, Florence, Louis and Henry.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 327

WEAVER, Josiah born in Miramichi, New Brunswick, November 26th, 1845. Went with his parents to Frederickton, lived there nine years and came to Minnesota in 1856, with his father, his mother having died when he was eighteen months old. Since coming to this state he has lived with Mrs. Hoff. He enlisted January, 1865, in company B, Second Minnesota Infantry Volunteers; served until July 10, 1865, when he was discharged.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 321

WEBB, F. W. was born in England, in 1849, and lived there twenty-one years. He emigrated to America in 1870, and settled in Corcoran where he has since resided. He has built a substantial farm house valued at $1,000. In the fall of 1872 he returned to England, and married Elizabeth Barrows; he returned the following spring with his wife to his home in Corcoran. They are the parents of two children.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by: Wayne C. Blesi.  waybliss@aol.com

WEBER, Jacob was born in 1853 in Zurich, Switzerland His wife Bertha born in 1853 of Zurich came to America in 1877 and settled in Champlin, MN. around 1880-1882, He built a home across the road from the town cemetery by Elm Creek. They were active in the St. Fridolin Lutheran Church of New Schwanden, A son Julius was born on Aug.8,1887 and died on May 12,1915 from a gunshot wound by William Karstedt while wrestling to remove the gun who had mental problems and anger because his wife Edith Weber Karstedt who had separated from him and was staying at her fathers home.  Jacob had come out of the house to settle the issue when he got entangled under the horse when it was shot and frightened and got trampled on and run over by the buggy which William had rented from the Anoka Livery stable. Jacob recovered from his injuries. He died on Jan.21, 1934 and buried in the Town Cemetery of  Champlin. MN. Mr  Karstedt was arrested and was placed in a asylum for a few years and was released being considered cured of his problem. William had a son William Karstedt Jr. born on Nov.3,1913 died on Nov.13,1974 who was either born with a short leg or had polio. Jacob and Bertha had another son John C Weber born in 1883 who lived his entire life in his fathers home. He was engaged in auto repair and machine shop work until his death in 1964. John also served as the church janitor for many years of which Nicholas Zopfi took on his duty afterwards. Edith Weber was born in 1873 Jacob and Bertha also had 2 younger children 1 Edwin born in 1910 2. Emma born in 1908.Only Julius Weber in 1915 and a Weber baby in 1900 are buried in the St. Fridolin Cemetery of New Schwanden, MN.

 

From "Our Independence 1854-1981" Submitted by Claudine Pearson ClaudeP@aol.com

WEIDENBACH, John - A German settlement began in Medina in 1855 and by 1856 it had spread into Independence in the area around Lake Sarah.  John Weidenbach came from German in 1856.  His father, Michael, and the rest of his family arrived two years later.  Members of the family were:  Adolph, who had just completed a term as a Hussar in the German army, Matthew, Michael, Lucy (Mrs. Mathias Jacobs), Bertrude (Mrs. Wagner), and Mary (Mrs. Jordon).  Adolph had his farm in Section 3.  He became a teacher and Justice of the Peace.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 654

WEINARD, Frederick was born October 19th, 1819, in Germany. He grew to manhood in his native country and learned the painter's trade. In 1848 he came to the United States, and first located in Delaware; removed to St. Anthony in 1854, and the next year took a claim of one hundred and sixty acres on Rush Creek, occupied until 1856, returned to St. Anthony, and after working in a sawmill several years, went back to his trade; he is one of the oldest painters in the city. In 1849 he married Katrina Boto. Their living children are: Justina, Mary, Fred and William.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 321

WEINAND, Peter a native of Germany, was born in 1838. He emigrated to America in 1852, and settled in Wisconsin; removed to Minnesota in 1856, and in 1858 bought the farm in Corcoran on which he has since lived. In 1877, he was elected representative from the twenty-seventh district, and has held every position of trust in his town. He married, in 1864, Mary Swagert, by whom he has six children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 655

WEINGERT, Peter was born November 1st, 1830, a native of Germany. He settled in St. Anthony in 1855, and worked at his trade, tailoring, one year; then kept a boarding house until 1861, next engaging in mercantile business. In 1871 he erected his store and continued in trade until his death, April 30th, 1872. Since that time Mrs. Weingert has conducted the business alone, dealing in dry goods and groceries. She has had nine children; the living are: Henry, Josephine, Peter and Girddie.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 268

WEIDENBACH, A. also a native of Prussia, was born in 1833, and emigrated to this country in 1858. He came at once to Hennepin county and has cleared a good farm on section three. He is a teacher, and justice of the peace. In 1865, he married Miss Cacilia Bukorwsky. Adolph, Cacilia, Harmon, John, Amelia, Mary, Lucy., and Edward, are their children. His post office address is Rockford, Wright county.

 

Minneapolis Morning Tribune, Monday Dec. 17, 1928

WEISMANN, A C. , A. C. WEISMANN Rites Will Be Held Today. Funeral services for A. (missing) mann of St. Louis Park, (missing) Friday in Eitel hospital, will (missing) Monday at 1:30 p.m. at (missing) funeral home, 1414 Laurel (missing) Burial will be in St. Mary (missing) tery.

Submitted by Jackie Ginn. (Jackie is not related to the above and does not have additional information)

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 297

WELLMAN, E. was born in Dayton, Hennepin county, Minnesota, in 1855. He learned the blacksmith trade with Eli Haviland at Osseo. On November 3d, 1878, he was married to Delora Haviland, who was born in Maple Grove, Minnesota. They have one child: Lorissa.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 656

WELLS, Charles L. M.G. was born October 13th, 1842, at Pompey, New York. Was educated at Hobart College, took the degree of A. B., and later that of A. M. Taught classics at Burlington College one year, and three years at the High school of Geneva. In 1869 he graduated at the Geneva Medical College and the five years following acted as first assistant physician at Willard's Asylum for the insane. Since September, 1875, has been in practice here. Dr. Wells married in 1870, Hattie Stilwell of New York. Henry and Mary are their children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 655

WELLS, G. G. a native of Cazenovia, New York, was born January 20th, 1852. Went to Albany in 1846 to learn the jeweler's trade, and remained there five years; then spent one year at Dubuque, Iowa, and three at Jackson, Michigan. In 1856 established himself in business in this city; four years later formed a partnership with W. H. Chamberlain, which continued nine years; since then Mr. Wells has given his entire attention to watch work and repairing; his place of business is the Nicollet House. In 1853, married Minnie Slead. They have had two children, James and Hattie. The latter died at the age of thirteen months.

 

From "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley, Voyguer Press. 1890


(Click for large image)

WELLES, Henry T. Henry T. Wells played a leading role in the upbuilding of the village to metropolitan porportions. He arrived on the scene of action in 1853. He had reached then the age of thirty-two. Though a member of a wealthy Connecticut family, he knew what hard work was. He had considerable means, and used it, not simply to his own advantage, but in the furthurance ooof the general interests of the community. He was largely influential in developing industrial enterprises, and did much to help the building of railroads into the city, the two principal factors in its growth. He is still (1890) an honored resident of the city, with large business interests. Mr. Welles, in the early days, held many important offices, including that of Mayor. (SEE ALSO BELOW)

From "History of the Minnesota Valley", published by the North Star Publishing Company, 1882.

Page 283

WELLES, Henry T., was born April 3, 1821, in Hartford county, Connecticut. Belonging to one of the best families of his native state, he was favored with rare advantages, and in 1843 graduated from Trinity College, Hartford. The first ten years after leaving college were mostly spent on the farm, divided with duties of a public character, and in 1850 he was honored with a seat in the legislature of his native state. Upon his arrival at St. Anthony in 1853 he became interested in the lumber business, and also purchased considerable real estate. In 1855 he was elected mayor of that city. He removed to Minneapolis in 1856, since which time he has been closely identified with the interests of the city. Mr. Welles has held various offices of trust, but since 1864 has had neither time or inclination to engage in political matters; he never hesitates, however, to give substantial aid in all matters that are of advantage to the city and state of his adoption. (SEE ALSO BELOW)

From the "History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis", 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 655

WELLES, Henry T. The great North-west owes much of its prosperity to the blood which has been transplanted from the shores of New England. Many of the early settlers and pioneers of Minnesota were natives of that rugged, stern, honest portion of the union. In their advent to the west they retained their habits of industry, economy and integrity which they had formed in early life. The effect of this transplanting, in numerous instances, was to enlarge the mind; from the fact of its having more room for expansion, in the many facilities for enterprises of nearly every variety. A great work was before them, a new empire was to be inaugurated. The vast, rich prairies were to be occupied; cities were to be built, church and school edifices to be erected; arts and sciences to be introduced and patronized; public highways and internal improvements were to be made, including costly bridges, factories, mills and workshops. Truly a great work lay before these people, and probably among the early immigrants to this portion of the valley of the great river, there was no one more capable or more willing to assist in the mammoth work than Henry T. Welles, who was born April 3d, 1821, in Hartford county, Connecticut. He made St. Anthony his home in 1853. Belonging to one of the best families of his native state, he was favored in boyhood with rare advantages, having graduated in 1843 from Trinity College, Hartford. In those days neither, wealth nor position exempted the young man of New England from habits of industry. During the college vacations he assisted in tilling the broad acres of the family homestead, and the first ten years after leaving college were mostly spent on the farm, though divided. with duties of a public character. In 1850 he was honored with a seat in the legislature of his native state. Upon his arrival in St. Anthony, became interested in the lumbering business to which were added other industries, and having ample means he purchased considerable real estate. In 1855 he was elected mayor of that city. He removed to Minneapolis in 1856, having previously made large purchases on this side of the river, has been closely identified the interests of this city, has done much to develop its industries, and in 1868, was president of the town council, and president of the board of education. In l863 he was unanimously nominated for governor of the state, by the democratic party; but he failed of an election in consequence of the overwhelming majority of the republicans. Since 1864 he has had neither time or inclination to engage in political matters, the management of his real estate occupying much of his attention, but he never hesitates to give substantial aid in all matters that are of material advantage to the city, and state of his adoption. The different railroads that center in Minneapolis had to be encouraged by the citizens in every possible way. Mr. Welles invested large sums of money, that the city might enjoy these railway facilities. Different objects of charity have frequently received his bounty, while the educational interests of the community have been aided by him in no trivial manner. In addition to other numerous duties, he is president of the North-western National Bank, one of the best monied institutions of the city. His financial abilities' are peculiarly fitted for this office. Previous to coming to Minnesota, Mr. Welles was happily married and has an interesting family. In closing this small tribute of respect to Mr. Welles, the writer would add that Minneapolis has been fortunate in the character of the men who have built up the industries of the place; they are the worthy cotemporaries of Mr. Welles. (SEE ALSO BELOW)

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

WELLES, Henry T. In the foremost rank of Minnesota's Pioneers, for no one has done more for the city and state of his adoption, stands Henry T. Welles.

Of old Puritan stock, his family was long prominent in affairs of church and state in both old and new England.

Born in Glastonbury, Connecticut, April 3, 1821, he was well educated, first in the town schools and later in Trinity College, from which he received his degree of A. B. in 1834. Studying law, he was admitted to the bar of Hartford County in 1845, and in 1850 was elected a member of the state legislature.

In 1853 he removed to St. Anthony and forming a partnership almost immediately with Mr. Franklin Steele, engaged in the lumber business, operating seven of the eight saws then at St. Anthony. In 1855 he was elected the first mayor of St. Anthony, and later was president of the first town council of Minneapolis. The first bridge across the Mississippi was built at Nicollet Island by Messrs. Welles and Steele, proprietors of the Minneapolis Bridge Company.

Probably the two most important services which Mr. Welles rendered his towns people during his long and useful life were his efforts towards the preservation of the falls and his conception of and co-operation in building the Minneapolis and Duluth and the Minneapolis and St. Louis railways.

Mr. Welles was prominent in financial institutions, assisted in organizing the Farmers' and Mechanics' and the Northwestern National banks, of which latter be was president for a number of years. Mr. Welles was a life-long consistent member of the Episcopal church, and gave most generously of his abundance to that as well as other denominations.

His death occurred in Minneapolis, March 4, 1898. Of winning manners and noble character of unfailing loyalty, to his adopted city, wise and generous in his philanthropy, Mr. Welles was beloved by his friends and honored and revered by his fellow-citizens. (SEE ALSO ABOVE & BELOW)

 

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

WELLES, Jerusha Lord, widow of Henry T. Welles, was born in Bolton, Connecticut, March 9, 1833. Her father, Joseph Lord, was a direct descendant in the sixth generation of John Haynes, first governor of Connecticut, and in the seventh generation of Thomas Lord, one of the original proprietors of Hartford, who emigrated to the colonies in 1653, while Daniel, her grandfather, served in the War of the Revolution.

While still a child Miss Lord removed with her family to Glastonbury, where she lived until her marriage to Mr. Welles, which occurred May 3, 1853. Starting westward, Mr. Welles reached St. Anthony June 13th, Mrs. Welles stopping to visit relatives in Illinois, not joining him until August 1, 1853.

While residing on the east side Mr. and Mrs. Welles were affiliated with Holy Trinity church, then on their removal to the west side with Gethsemane and finally with St. Mark's parishes. Like her husband a loyal and devoted member of the church, generous spirited and energetic by nature, Mrs. Welles has been zealous and untiring in all good works, and many have been the recipients of her wise charity. (SEE ALSO ABOVE)

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 656

WENSINGER, John born in Switzerland, May 22d, 1825. Came with his parents to America in 1833 and located at Richland county, Ohio. Removed to Huron in 1840, thence to Sandusky City, where he remained until 1843, learning the boot and shoe business; then engaged in trade at Newark; from there went to Cincinnati and remained until 1849, when he located in St. Anthony, and has since that time been closely identified with its history and growth. Mr. Wensinger engaged in the boot and shoe business here, renting for his shop the old Indian trading post; the year following built a store and took a partner, Col. Spooner in the harness trade. He purchased in Galena, a stock of groceries and established in connection with the first bakery in St. Anthony. He afterwards opened the first shoe shop on the west side of the river; he built the first wooden block in St. Anthony, and the first brick block on Central Avenue. Mr. Wensinger always assisted every enterprise calculated to benefit the town, and often sold lots far below their real value, in order to induce new comers to settle here. Has been tendered several offices, state, county and town, but would never accept, owing to his love for his own mercantile business, and his interest in building up St. Anthony. In 1858 joined a stock company and built the "Fall City," the first steamer built and owned by Minneapolitans; she was run between this place and Pittsburgh; but he lost $9,000 by this investment. Mr. Wensinger always took pride in assisting young men in business, and his generosity sometimes caused him severe losses. His wife by his first marriage was Clara Swan, they were united in 1852, and she bore him two children. Nellie and Nettie, (deceased.) Married the second time in 1869, to Hattie Hyde.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 656

WENTWORTH, Frank a native of Maine, was born June 1st, 1841, at Athens. In 1873, moved to Minneapolis, and after working about two months in the Empire mill, went to La Crosse, and was with E. V. White five years. Was afterward with Mr. Davis nearly a year in the Galesville mill, and in September, 1879, returned to this city. Since that time has been engaged at the Standard mill.

 

From the Minneapolis Morning Tribune, Dec 17, 1928

WENTWORTH, Minnie - wife of Roy E. Wentworth, 3259 41st av S, passed away Friday.  Funeral services Tuesday at 2 p.m. from the Earl Parlors.  Interment Crystal Lake.

Submitted by Jackie Ginn. (Jackie is not related to the above and does not have additional information.)

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 656

WERTHMANN, J. a native of Bavaria, was born in 1836. Came to America in 1862, and locating at Chicago, engaged in the furniture business; six years later, removed to Winona and pursued the same line of business there until 1871, when he came to this city. Was five years employed as foreman for Burr, Morris and Company, furniture manufacturers, and in 1878 went into trade with Mr. Sonnen; they are doing a lucrative business. Mr. Werthmann was married in 1870 to Catherine Plasy.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 657

WEST, E. B. was born at Pembrook, New Hampshire, in 1825. When nineteen years of age, entered mercantile business, which he continued until coming to St. Anthony in 1855; he then went into the cattle trade, and five years later started in the sash and door business; he was afterwards, milling and dealing in real estate until 1878, when he established his auction and commission business at 221 Washington Avenue South. In 1860 Mr. West had an experience which one would hardly believe possible for a man to survive. As he, in company with others, was about to bathe in the Mississippi above the falls on the east side, he lost his footing, and was carried over the rapids. At that time the volume of water was much greater than now; he was swept over the fall of thirty feet, but by su per-human efforts kept in the undertow, which threw him out beyond the reach of the return current on the surface; finally he was thrown on the rocks near the Chalybeate springs, some three hundred feet below the fall; his body was covered with bruises, but no bones broken. He returned and surprised his companions who thought him dead. Mr. West's wife, Mary Morrison, died in 1873, leaving three children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 656

WEST, John was born in England, May 27th, 1840. He moved to New York with his parents in 1852, locating near Lockport; he went to Illinois in 1855, and two years later, to Anoka, Minnesota. In 1861, enlisted and served until honorably discharged in 1864; was afterwards authorized to enlist recruits for Battery E, First Minnesota Heavy Artillery, and commissioned second lieutenant of the battery, and ordered to Tennessee; was promoted to first lieutenant, and mustered out in September, 1865. Bought a farm in Richfield and lived there until 1872, when he came to this city and the next year entered the police force as patrol and was promoted to his present position as sergeant. In 1865 he married Agnes Better, who has borne him five children; the four living are: Rose, Kate, Mary and Lilly.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 230

WEST, Wm. Jr. born in England, February 28, 1847. Came to America and settled in New York in 1852. Went to Will county, Illinois, in 1856. To Anoka county Minnesota in 1866, where his father preempted a farm which he still owns. Married in 1872 to Miss Mary Kell of this township. Moved to his present farm in 1868. They have three children, Leona, Fannie, G., Ewing W. Land valued at $2000.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 657

WESTLING, Andrew Gustavus lay preacher at Bethlehem Church, was born in Sweden June 16th, 1823. Coming to America in 1873, he settled at Lake City, Minnesota, where he remained until the fall of 1879. He then came to Minneapolis, and has since remained here. His eldest son, Peter G., is a minister at Duluth, Minnesota.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 657

WESTLING, L. J. a native of Sweden, was born July 4th, 1858. He accompanied his parents to America in 1873, and settled at Lake City; was employed a number of years there and at Red Wing as moulder. In 1879, came to Minneapolis, and is now engaged in moulding for the Union Iron Works.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 321

WESTPHAL, August was born in Prussia, in 1831, He was educated in his native land; graduated from the College of Bromberg, and followed school teaching for twelve years. Enlisted, in the German army in 1851, and served three years in Berlin. He emigrated to America in 1864, settled in Milwaukee and taught school. In 1866 he came to Minnesota, and finally settled in Corcoran. Married in 1866 to Emily Long, by whom he has had fourteen children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 656

WESTPHAL, H. A. was born July, 1850, in Germany. In 1868, came to Minneapolis, and the same year engaged to work in the ice business for H. Kreitz; three years later, Mr. Westphal went into the same business, starting with very limited means, but is now having an extensive trade. Is also engaged in the wood business, handling about three thousand loads annually. His marriage with Christiana Glitschka occurred in 1875. Their children are Ida and Carl.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 293

WETHERN, George, was born in Somerset county, Maine, in 1841, and lived there seventeen years; came to Minnesota in 1858, and enlisted August 14, 1862, in Company A, Ninth Minnesota Infantry; served until October, 1863, under General Sibley against the Indians, then went south; came back and was honorably discharged in St. Paul, July 1865. He went to Pierce county, Wisconsin, for one year, then returned to Hennepin county. In March, 1867, he married Amanda Wilson, and located in Pierce county, Wisconsin, in 1868; but returned to Minnesota in 1875 and settled in Brooklyn, where he has since resided. They have had six children, four are now living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 246

WHIPPLE, Knight H. born in Foster, Providence county, R. I., July 29, 1836. Went to Providence, worked at the mason's trade for several years. July 1855, came to Minneapolis, lived there three years, helped build the first brick house in the town, built the residence of Rev. Gideon Pond at Bloomington. In 1859 made a trip to Red River, 1864 bought the place on which he lives. During the Indian massacre, was Quartermaster under Col. Stevens, at Glencoe. October 1862, married Sarah Fuller. He is the father of one child.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 657

WHIPPLE, Milton born June 9th, 1858, in Center county, Pennsylvania. He spent a few months in Iowa, in 1875, buying grain; and afterward traveled between Omaha and North Platte, selling goods. Returned home to attend school, and in June, 1879, came to this city; the following September he went to work at the Northwestern mill.

 

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

WHITCOMB, George C. and wife. One of the most important events in the early settlement of Minnesota was the Indian massacre of 1862, and among settlers of that date perhaps none figured more prominently therewith than Captain George C. Whitcomb and wife. The story of their losses, their valor and their active devotion to duty would, if written in full, make an interesting and thrilling chapter in the history of the state. The following is from General C. A. Grant's biographical sketch:

George C. Whitcomb was born in Bolton, Vt., Dec. 28, 1821.

Anna D. Felch was born in Dedham, Mass., Jan. 17, 1819.

They were married in Cambridge, Vt., Nov. 4, 1847. Both descended from eminent and patriotic ancestors. Her father was a chaplain in the United States navy, and was with Capt. Bainbridge on board the Constitution when he fought and captured the British ship Java in the War of 1812.

They came to Minnesota in June, 1856, first locating at St. Anthony and settled later on a homestead in Meeker County. In 1862 they had a young family, an excellent farm, nearly all in cultivation, and all fenced in, and some of the best buildings in the county, a fine stock of cattle and other animals. Forest City county was the county seat and Mr. Whitcomb was the county treasurer.

He raised a company of 103 men intending to take them to Fort Snelling to join a regiment being raised there for service in the civil war. On the night of Aug. 16, 1862, there appeared on his premises seven Indians, all armed and with hostile intent. He gave them food, smoked the pipe of peace, and assured them that their supplies were on the way, and justice would be done them. The next day they left, taking the trail for the agency. He soon heard at Forest City that the Indians had murdered two families at Acton, seven miles from his home. He sent men to learn the facts and they returned about one o'clock that night and confirmed the reports. By that time the settlers fleeing from the Indians, were coming into Forest City in great numbers. They came with teams and on foot, men, women and children, driving their cattle before them, and bringing such property as they could. It was evident that the country south, west and north was being abandoned, and that Forest City was a center to which many were tending. Capt. Whitcomb immediately started for St. Paul to see the governor and obtain means to defense. He drove to Carver, arriving before sundown that day. He found no means of transportation from there, except a small steamer with an unwilling captain. He took forcible possession and compelled the men in charge to run to St. Paul with all possible speed. Arriving at St. Paul the governor commissioned him as captain, provided him with arms and ammunition, and directed him to return and use his company in checking the stampede and defending the settlers. His steamer and another, loaded with 100 muskets, 5,000 cartridges and other supplies, soon started up the river for Shakopee, where he impressed into the service horses and wagons, loaded them with the supplies and started for the frontier. At Hutchinson he left twenty-five muskets and 1,000 cartridges to be used in the defense against the Indians, and pressed on to Forest City, arriving there in the least time possible. Here he reorganized the company, issued his remaining arms and ammunition, and with a part of his company started out into what had then become the Indian country. He found death and destruction everywhere, but no Indians. He was gone three days and buried twenty-seven dead bodies of white settlers. Upon his return to Forest City be constructed a stockade and prepared for defense. Two days later he was attacked by the Indians, 200 strong. They were repulsed with loss. Our loss was eight men wounded. Mrs. Whitcomb remained at Forest City, caring for the sick and wounded, and when all the other women sought safety elsewhere.

Captain Whitcomb remained with his company in active service against the Indians until late in the fall, when the company was discharged. On returning to his farm he found the work of destruction had been complete. The buildings and fences had all been burned, and the cattle killed or driven off. The loss amounted to several thousands of dollars - a serious loss to an early settler - it being the accumulation of years of labor and economy.

The strange and pathetic part of it is: Capt. Whitcomb has never received pay for his losses. By his prompt and effective action he saved many valuable lives and several hundred thousands of dollars to the state. Others have received pay for losses, while he has not received a dollar. When the commission was in the state collecting evidence and adjusting losses he was in the service of the government watching and defending the frontier against raids and massacres. At the time of the outbreak there was no available force to resist the Indians, protect the settlers and check the stampede, except Capt. Whitcomb and his gallant company. Had the outbreak been delayed until he and his company had gone to the war, there would probably have not been left a living white settler in most of the country west of the Twin Cities. As it was the company would have been of but little avail had it not been for the prompt action in procuring arms and ammunition.

Early in 1863 Captain Whitcomb raised another company, which was mustered into the United States service and became Company B of Hatches' Battalion. He remained in the service with this company until 1866, when they were honorably discharged. During this service he guarded the frontier from Fort Abercrombie to Fort Pembina, wintering one winter at Pembina. He had charge of seven "cantonments," to-wit: Georgetown' Twin Lake Station, Old Crossing, Pomme de Terre, Chippewa, Alexandria and Sauk Center.

Capt. Whitcomb and his estimable wife received their friends at their golden wedding nearly five years ago. They now, April, 1901, live in Minneapolis, beloved by their neighbors and respected by all who know them.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WHITCOMB, S. O. a native of Canada, was born July 24th, 1856. Moved to Illinois and learned the drug business, went to Iowa in 1877, and was in trade there two years; May 1879, removed to Minneapolis and is doing a good business at 505 Washington Avenue south.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 657

WHITE, Edwin a native of Canada, was born June 16th, 1831. In 1846, moved with his parents to Iowa and remained until 1854, when he went to Indiana. He held the office of register of deeds of Decatur county, for four years, then received the appointment of chief clerk and deputy treasurer, for the same county; afterward was elected city clerk, at the same time serving as clerk in the provost marshal's office. In 1866, poor health made a change desirable, and he went to Ottumwa, Iowa; was cashier in a bank, and afterward opened a real estate and insurance office. Came here in 1870, and continued the same business. In 1851, married at Marion, Iowa, Emna Edkins. Their children, Horace, William, George, Charles and Marcus have all passed away.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 657

WHITE, William O. born at Worcester, Massachusetts, October 22d, 1835. In 1850, went to Chicago, and on arrival at that city his whole capital amounted to one dollar and twenty-five cents. He learned car building with the Illinois Central railroad company, and remained with then, four years; then removed to Hastings, Minnesota, where he was contracting and house building until 1861. Enlisted in December of that year; was promoted to commissary sergeant, and served on the frontier among the Indians. December, 1864, returned to Hastings, and worked nine years at the Vermillion mill. In 1873, came here, and after working for C. A. Pillsbury two and one-half years, removed to the Red River Valley and located 960 acres of land. Since July, 1877, has been at the Minneapolis mill. In 1856, married Mrs. Delia Kibbe, who has borne him one child - Clarence.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 262

WHITEHOUSE, William T. was born in Brooklyn, New York, January 12th, 1852. Married in 1872, to Miss Mary Major. He did a large business in boots and shoes at Troy, till 1876, then moved to St. Paul, and engaged in the same business. In 1877, he bought the place where he now lives. In 1878, moved his family to what is now called "Maple Shade." He organized the Minnetonka Navigation Company in 1880. He intends to have the largest fleet of steamers on Lake Minnetonka.

 

From "History of the Minnesota Valley", published by the North Star Publishing Company, 1882, and "The History of Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis", published 1881.

WHITNEY, J. C. was born in April, 1818, at Springfield, Vermont. In 1829, moved with his parents to Canada, and remained until twenty years of age. He attended college, at Oberlin, Ohio, and in 1849, graduated from Union Seminary, New York. The same year removed to Stillwater, Minnesota, where he was a pastor of the First Presbyterian church until 1853; at that time he came to Minneapolis, and held the position of pastor of the First Presbyterian church here for four years. In 1857 removed to Forest City, and returned here in 1860. In 1862, enlisted and served three years; was appointed quartermaster with the rank of captain. Returned in 1865 and engaged in real estate business. Mr. Whitney married in 1849, Eliza Bayard.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WHITNEY, Oliver B. was born at Stillwater, July 23d, 1853, and the following September, came with his parents to this city. He attended the public schools here, and when twenty years of age commenced lumbering. Worked for George A. Camp, L. Butler, Clough Brothers, and since April, 1878, has been with Cole and Hammond as book-keeper. In 1875, married Pauline Hyland; she has borne him two children: Gertrude and Henry.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WICKINGS, W. C. born August 3d, 1839, at Boston, Massachusetts. He studied dentistry four years at Philadelphia, then removed to New York city and practiced thirteen years. In 1873 he went to St. Louis, Missouri, and followed his profession there until June, 1880, when he came here and established what is known as the New York dental rooms. The apartments are furnished in an elegant manner, and supplied with all the appliances necessary for mechanical and operative dentistry. Dr. Wickings married in 1864, Frances Long.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WILCOX, J. F. a native of Ohio, was born January 4th, 1848, at Middlebury. Came to Minneapolis in September, 1867, was employed by Wheaton, Reynolds and Francis three years and then admitted as a member of the firm, Mr. Francis having retired. Mr. Wilcox's marriage with Emma Clement took place in June, 1871. Three children have been born to them: Harry, Archa and Myrtice.

 

File contributed for Minnesota Biographies Project by Wayne C. Blesi. waybliss@aol.com

WILD, Samuel came from Engi, Switzerland in 1868 with His wife Verena nee Scheisser and 2 Sisters, Anna born in 1847,and Agatha Wild born in 1856, who both married John Hefti Jr. of Champlin,  MN.. Samuel and Verena had 1 child, Michael Wild, and lived on the west side of Goose Lake in New Schwanden area. The Wild's were members of the St.Fridolin's Lutheran Church of New Schwanden. Michael Wild married Barbara Zimmermann, daughter of Frederick and Marbaret "Blesi" Zimmermann.  Michael's second wife was Ella H. nee Dressel. After Ella passed away Michael had no descendants to inherit his estate, of which the Swiss Government claimed part of and the rest of it was paid to the Dressel family for taking care of Michael for his last years of care prior to his demise in 1958.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 293

WILLIAMS, Dr. A. D was born in Bennington county, Vermont, in 1826. He moved with his mother to Eaton county, Michigan, and lived there twelve years. Received his collegiate and theological education at Rochester University, and Theological seminary at Rochester, New York, graduating from the University in 1855, and the Seminary in 1857. He then took charge of Smyrna, Michigan, Baptist church, and was next Pastor of Almont Baptist church for six years. In 1866 he came to Faribault, Minnesota, engaging in home missionary work with different churches until 1870; then came to Brooklyn and was pastor of the Baptist church here and in Maple Grove for two years. He studied medicine and began to practice Homeopathy at Almont, Michigan. He has practiced medicine at Brooklyn Centre for the past seven years. Dr. Williams was married in 1857, to Helen M. Gaskin, of New York. They have two children living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WILLIAMS, David was born September 24th, 1830, at Chester, England. His father being a miller, he learned the trade at home, and in 1865 emigrated to Lower Canada, where he remained five years. Then removed to Toronto remaining three years. In May, 1875, came to Minneapolis and was employed in the Washburn "A" mill for two and one-half years, then engaged with the North western mill, and for the last two years has held the position of head miller. Married Miss Elizabeth Lloyd in 1861. Their children are: Edward, Ever, Albert, Walter, Jessie and Maud.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WILLIAMS, George was born at Calais, Maine, March 9th, 1843, where he lived until twenty-five years of age. His life time pursuit has been in the mercantile business. Came to St. Anthony in 1878, and was in the employ of J. H. Chase a few months when he accepted his present position in the dry-goods store of O. T. Swett, on University Avenue. His marriage to Etta B. Mayo occurred at St. Anthony, in 1871. Their children are: John M., Mary A. and Gertle.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WILLIAMS, Henry was born in Chenango county, New York, May 28th, 1845. He went to Michigan with his parents in 1854. Attended school, also farmed, until 1863, when he removed to Chicago, and two years later located at Lake City, Minnesota. Came to Minneapolis the next year and joined the volunteer fire department in 1874. In 1877 he was appointed fire police and in 1879 was appointed foreman of Hose Company Number Two in the paid department, which position he now holds. Was married in this city in 1868 to Agnes O'Harra.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WILLIAMS, Jessie T. was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, March 20th, 1822. He moved to Wayne county, Indiana, when very young, and made it his home until 1867. Was elected sheriff of that county in 1856. Located at Minneapolis in 1870, and is now deputy sheriff. He was married in 1845 to Anna Greaves, of Indiana. Their children are: Ethal L.. Laura and Estella.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 293

WILLIAMS, John was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1851, and lived there until 1862. He came to Hennepin county in 1868, and settled in Brooklyn, where he has since resided. In 1875 he married Ida M. Thomas of this county; they have three children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 268

WILLIAMS, John a native of New York, was born in 1818. From that state he went to Indiana, where he remained until 1855, when he came to Independence, and preempted a claim of 160 acres. He was the second man who moved into this town, and has since resided here. In 1848, he enlisted, and served one year in the Mexican war. James, Allie, Harvey, Moses, George, and Imogene are children by his first marriage. His present wife was a Miss Wright, to whom he was married in 1873.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 658

WILLIAMS, Martin T. S. King's assistant on the Minneapolis department of the "Pioneer Press," came to the state in the spring of 1853, and for several years was employed on the early newspapers of St. Paul. Subsequently he published the St. Peter "Tribune," but disposed of it in 1869, and became connected with the city department of the St. Paul "Press." Since the absorption of the "Pioneer" and the Minneapolis "Mail" and "Tribune" by the original "Press Printing Company," he has been associated with Mr. King on the Minneapolis department of the "Pioneer Press." still retaining the position occupied for several years.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 659

WILLIAMS, S. M. was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, September 18th, 1845. He came to Minneapolis in 1857, and has since made this his place of residence. He established the book and stationery business at 224 Hennepin Avenue in 1863, and is still located there. He was married in 1879 to Sarah Williams of this city.

 

WILLIAMS, Storrs Cotton, Late in the year 2000, while searching Westminister's Archives, senior pastor Timothy Hart-Anderson found a dusty old scrapbook titled "Book of Remembrances, Class No. 1. Compiled by ten boys ages 10-12, and inspired by their teacher Andrew Benton, the book is filled with photos, information about the boys, inspiring quotes from notable regional and national figures, and messages to future students. Click on the link below to explore the Book of Remembrance and read the legacy left by ten boys, including Storrs CottenWiliams.
http://www.ewestminster.org/classof01/biographies

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 328

WILLIAMSON, J.M. a native of Washington, Ohio, was born February 24th, 1857. He came to Minnesota in 1865, and settled in Maple Grove, September 4th, 1880, he married Miss Sophia Zeorb. His father enlisted October 23d, 1861, in Company B, Seventy-fifth Ohio Infantry, but was discharged for physical disability, and was not able do a day's work after he came out of the army. Mr. Williamson, Sr., died in 1880.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 328

WILMOT, L. B. was born in LaPorte, Indiana, August 18th, 1839, and lived there fifteen years; then went to Minneapolis, and from there to the Black Hills, where he remained two years. Married Miss R. Foster, August 12th, 1875, and now lives in Maple Grove. They have one child, George.

 

From "Minneapolis, Portrait of the Past", collected and compiled by Edward A. Bromley. Voyaguer Press. 1890.


(Click for large image)

WILSON, Eugene M. For many years Eugene M. Wilson stood at the front in the ranks of his profession, and as a progressive and public-spirited citizen. He came to Minneapolis in 1857, when he was twenty-three years of age. He had been admitted to the bar two years previous, and made unusually repaid headway. He was United Statess District Attorney under President Buchanan's administration. In the Civil War he served as captain of Company A, First Minnesota Calvary. He was a member of the national House of Representatives in 1871, and State Senator in 1879. For four years --1872 to 1876-- he was Mayor of the city. He was the Democratic nominee for Governor in 1888. His death in 190 was a great shock and a great loss to the community. As an evidence of the esteem in which he was held may be mentioned the fact that a bust of Mr. Wilson is to be placed in Central Park.

As listed in the proceedings and report of the annual meetings of the Minnesota Territorial Pioneers, May 11, 1899 and 1900.

WILSON, Eugene M. was born in Morgantown, Va. Dec. 25, 1833. His father, Edgar C. Wilson, and his grandfather, Thomas Wilson, were members of congress from Virginia, and his ancestry on both maternal and paternal sides were patriots and soldiers of the Revolutionary War. Mr. Wilson graduated from Jefferson College at the age of eighteen, and was admitted to the bar when twenty-one years of age. In 1856 he came to Minnesota, first settling at Winona, where he formed a law partnership with William Mitchell, afterwards justice oi state supreme court. In 1857 he was appointed United States district attorney for Minnesota by President Buchanan, and moved to Minneapolis.

In 1861 he formed a law partnership with W. W. McNair, who afterwards became his brother-in-law. In 1862 he was commissioned captain of Company A, of the First Minnesota Cavalry, serving for one year on the northern frontier. While in this service he made the acquaintance of Elizabeth Kimball, only daughter of Col. William Kimball of St. Anthony, then quartermaster for northwestern military posts, to whom he was married Sept. 6, 1865.

In 1868 Captain Wilson, who was always a staunch Democrat, was elected to congress in a strong Republican district, owing to the split in the Republican party, and his own popularity, Ignatius Donnelly and C. C. Andrews being the two Republican candidates. At the end of his term in congress he returned to the law practice, and was for many years one of the foremost lawyers of the state. In 1872, when the cities of St. Anthony and Minneapolis were united, he was elected the first mayor of the new municipality, being re-elected in 1874 for another term of two years. In 1878 and again in 1880 he was elected state senator from Hennepin County. In 1888 he was the candidate of his party for governor, being defeated by W. R. Merriam. When the park system of Minneapolis was established he became a member of the park commission, a position he held until his death. For many years Captain Wilson was interested as a partner in the ownership of pine lands and in the lumber business in Northern Minnesota. In 1889, owing to failing health, accompanied by his wife and daughters, he started for Nassau, in the Bahamas, hoping the change of climate would restore him to health. It was at this place he died, on April 10, 1890, leaving a widow and three daughters. The family have since occupied the elegant home he built for them on Hawthorne avenue a few years before his death.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 659

WILSON, G. B. was born, March 20th, 1821, in Washington county, Maine. Came to St. Anthony in 1856, and engaged in lumbering. has driven an ox-team for twenty-two seasons in the pineries. While thus engaged he met with an experience from which he escaped with life almost by a miracle. While unloading logs from the sled, he was thrown forward about sixteen feet down a slope. Two enormous logs rolled after and over him; fortunately he landed in a crevice in the ground which gave space for the logs with their ponderous weight to pass over, leaving him unharmed. In 1878 he erected a building at 1205 Fifth street southeast which he occupies as a grocery. In the spring of 1880 he retired from the lumber business. His family consists of wife and three children: Clara L., Egbert S. and Sydney B.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 659

WILSON, John is a native of Scotland, born in 1838. He came to America in l850, locating near New York, on Long Island. In 1861, he enlisted at Rochester, New York in Company E, Thirteenth New York Regiment. He participated in many hard fought battles: first Bull Run, Siege at Yorktown, Hanover Court House and others. He was wounded in the seven days' fight before Richmond and left on the field, but was rescued and taken to Washington where he recovered and secured his discharge in 1863. He went to Logansport, Indiana, where he married Miss Lucinda Young, July 23d, 1864. They came to Minneapolis in 1866, and immediately engaged with the Minneapolis mill, remaining with the firm nearly twelve years.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 659

WILSON, Joseph P. is a native of New Jersey, born in 1822. He was in the law office of Silas M. Stilwell, at New York four years. In 1844, he removed to Illinois and was agent for a Chicago firm, to select and enter government lands for them in the northern part of the state. In 1847, went to the Mexican war and remained until its close. In April 1850, located at St. Anthony and engaged in mercantile business. Was one of the commissioners of Ramsey county, from 1851 till 1854; he was also in the legislature in 1856. He was a member of the constitutional convention to form a state constitution, and was a member of the senate in 1864-1865. He was one of the original proprietors of St. Cloud and Alexandria, Minnesota, and is now interested in New Mexico mines, in the vicinity of' Santa Fe.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 659

WILSON, M.D. was born at LaPorte, Indiana, May 28th, 1843. Went to Albert Lea, Minnesota, in 1867. He located in Minneapolis in 1877, and has since been buying and selling horses. He and his partner, A. R. Strickland, are now proprietors of a livery and sale stable, at 16 Washington Avenue north.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 659

WINCHELL, Newton, H. was born in Duchess county, New York, December 17th, 1839. In 1858 he entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and graduated in 1866. He was compelled to teach during his course in college, and thus spent eight years in getting his education. He was at different times superintendent of the public schools of Adrian, Port Huron and Kalamazoo. He was employed two years on the state geological survey of Michigan. Thence he went to Ohio, and in 1872, was summoned to Minnesota by the regents of the State University. Accepting the position of state geologist, he spent one- half of his time teaching, and the rest in directing the geological survey of the state. In 1878 he was relieved from teaching, and has since devoted himself wholly to the survey, and the preparation and acquisition of a museum. Professor Winchell was married in 1864, to Miss C. F. Innes, of Galesburg, Michigan, a graduate and afterwards teacher at Albion College, Michigan. They have five children: Horace V., I. C., Avis, Alexander and Louisa L.

Professor Winchell wrote some scientific articles for newspapers in his college course, and others since. The following are of a more permanent character and are found in the standard scientific periodicals of the day: 1. The Glacial Features of Green Bay, of Lake Michigan, with some observations on a probable former outlet of Lake Superior-American Journal of Science and Arts, July, 1871. 2. The Building Stones of Michigan-American Builder, May, June and July, 1871. 8. The Surface Geology of North-western Ohio-Proceedings of the American Association, 1872. 4. The Drift Deposits of the Northwest-Popular Science Monthly, June and July, 1873. 5. The Devonian Limestones in Ohio,-Proceedings of the American Association, 1873. 6. On the Hamilton in Ohio-American Journal of Science and Arts, April, 1874. 7. The Economical Geology of Cheboygan and Mackinac, state of Michigan-Michigan Board of Agriculture, Report for 1878. 8. Geological Notes from Early Explorers in Minnesota Valley- Vol. I-of the Bulletins of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences.' 9. Vegetable Remains in the Drift Deposits of the Northwest-Proceedings of the American Association, 1875. 10. On the Parallelism of Devonian Outcrops in Michigan and Ohio-Proceedings of the American Association, 1875. 11. The Cretaceous in Minnesota Vol. 1. of the Bulletins of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Sciences. 12. The Ancient Copper Mines of Isle Royale-Bulletins of the Minnesota Academy, Vol. 11. 13. Dall's Observations on Perennial Ice in Alaska-American Journal of Science and Arts, May, 1881. 14. The Capriteious Series in Minnesota-Proceedings of the American Association, 1880. 15. The Recession of the Falls of St. Anthony-Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London, Nov., 1878.. 16. The Mining Districts of Southwestern New Mexico--Raymond's; Mineral Resources West of the Rocky Mountains, 1874. 17. The report of his work in Ohio, where he surveyed and reported on twenty of the eighty counties of the state, are published in the First and Second Volumes of the Final Report of Newbury's Survey. 18. Since the Geological Survey of Minnesota was inaugurated bit; scientific papers have been published in the Annual Reports of Progress of the Survey, and pertain exclusively to the state. Of these reports nine have been published, to each of which he has been the principal contributor. They pertain to the geology and physical geography of all parts of the state, and treat of subjects of the most vital importance to the material development of Minnesota. Besides the series of Annual Reports, he has issued eleven miscellaneous publications and circulars relating to the survey. 19. In 1874 he accompanied Gen. G. A. Custer to the Black Hills, and his Geological Report and map of the Black Hills; published under the auspices of the War Department, comprised the first account of the interior of the Black Hills ever published. He discredited somewhat the wonderful reports of gold in the Black Hills, current at the time of Gen. Custer's return; and it must be admitted that no permanent gold mining has been established at any point visited by the Custer expedition. 20. The State and Higher Education; an address-Bulletins of the Minnesota Academy of Science, Vol. 11.

Prof. Winchell received the degrees of A. B. and A. M. of his alma mater, the University of Michigan. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a corresponding member of the New York and Buffalo Academies of Science, and president of the Minnesota Academy of Natural Science.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 660

WING, Kimball W. was born in 1837, at Belgrade, Missouri. At the age of nine he was converted, and at twenty united with the Methodist Episcopal Church at Gardner, Missouri. Reared on a farm; at the age of eighteen be embarked in the meat business, which he followed twelve years, when failing health compelled him to retire. At the age of twenty-eight he was married to Mary E. Kempster of West Gardner, Missouri. In 1867 he removed to Minneapolis in hope of recuperating his health. In 1872 he formed a partnership with M. D. Cone and embarked in the real estate and commission business, room No. 1, in Harrison's block on Washington Avenue, and has since been more or less actively engaged in that direction. Mr. Wing is an active member of the Franklin Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, is one of its trustees and assistant superintendent of the Sabbath school. He has four children: Weslie S., Willie E., Warren A., and Mabel G.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 660

WING, Thomas is a native of Canada, born July 5th, 1830. He went to Oswego, New York, in 1848, and learned the bakery business. In 1852, engaged in the business at Clayton, New York, thence to Chicago. After working in different places he located in Minneapolis in 1873. He was with Lillibridge's bakery three years. In 1876 established his business, and is at present at 20 First street south. He was united in marriage to Eliza A. Gibbons, in 1858. Their children are: Seymore T., Clarissa, Nellie, Laura, Donney M., Thomas and Mary.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 660

WINTER, Henry T. is a native of London, England, born 1846. He came to the United States in 1871, locating in Minneapolis. He was employed in the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railway machine shops until August, 1880. He then opened a saloon and billiard hall at 1413 Washington Avenue south. Married Francis Pilcher in 1866. They have three children.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 284

WITT, Charles a native of Germany, was born in 1827. He came to America in 1852, settled in Cleveland, Ohio, and engaged in the meat business. In 1854 he went to Superior City, and thence to Duluth ; which at that time had but two houses. In 1856 he went to Ontonagon, Michigan, then came to Minneapolis in 1867, and opened the "Lake Superior Market," and operated it until 1879, when he started his large stock yard and slaughter house, corner Second street and Twenty-Sixth Avenue north.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 661

WOLD, O. G. is a native of Norway, born October 20th, 1852. Came to the United States in 1860, and first located in Illinois. In 1868 removed to Grant county, Minnesota, where he lived on his father's farm two months. During that year he came to Minneapolis and engaged in his present line of business, that of dealing in and manufacturing pumps, etc. The firm of Reno and Wold is doing a rapidly growing trade. Located 103 First Avenue south.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 284

WOLF, Anton a native of Prussia, was born in 1830. He came to America in 1861, and in company with others went to Georgetown, on the Red River; remained there three months, then went to St. Cloud, Minnesota, thence to St. Paul, where he remained about three years, then went to Medina, where he married Mrs. Elizabeth Meurer Hilger. For a time he was at Minneapolis working in a lumber yard; he also kept the "Harmonia House" and the "Washington House." In 1875 he came to Crystal Lake and erected the hotel of which he is now proprietor. He has one child, Joseph.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 237

WOLF, Jacob was born in Prussia in 1828, and came to this country in 1847. After various business ventures in the East he visited the Northwest and in 1854 came to Minnesota and located on his present farm in 1855. Has been twice married, his union with his present wife occurring in 1875. Has three children by his present wife and three by his first. His residence is on section twenty-six.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 293

WOLTER, Christian a native of Germany, was born September 22, 1836. He came to America, in 1863, and enlisted the same year in company A, Hatches Independent Battalion Minnesota Volunteers, and served against the Indians nearly three years ; was honorably discharged at Fort Snelling. In 1866 he came to Osseo, where he now resides; has 200 acres of land. Married in 1867 to Francis Zimmerman; they have five children: Leopold, Rosa, Dora, William and Lillie.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 661

WOLVERTON, Jacob. A. was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, August 15th, 1832. He went to New York city in 1854, to take a situation in the wholesale dry goods house of Edward Lambert & Company. In November, 1858, he was married to Evelyn L. Olmstead. In the fall of the next year they came to Minnesota and have since been residents of Minneapolis. Mr. Wolverton was connected with the dry-goods house of Bell Brothers, eight years. Was also a member of the firms of Johnson & Wolverton, and Wolverton & Baker. In 1876, was appointed deputy clerk of district court; he was appointed clerk the spring following to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the clerk, Mr. Jerome. He was elected to that office the next term and held it four years.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 661

WOODS, Charles H. of the law firm of Woods & Babcock, is a native of New Hampshire, born October 8th, 1836. Received an academic education and a partial course at William's College. He was captain in a company in the sixteenth New Hampshire volunteer, and served one year after which he held a government, clerkship for three years. He removed to Minneapolis in 1866, and began the practice of law; he has been in continuous practice since, being associated with different lawyers. The firm of Woods & Babcock was formed in l878. He was elected justice of the peace at the first city election held in this city, after the, charter was granted. He married Miss Carrie C. Rice, of Vermont, in 1862. Residence 33 Tenth street south.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 661

WOODS, M. of the firm of Barber and Woods, is a native of Montreal, Canada, born September 13th, 1853, and lived there until twenty-four years of age, the last seven years being passed in the grocery business. He next engaged in the fur trade in Manitoba, in which he continued until Coming to Minneapolis in June, 1880. In July, he became a partner in the firm of Barber and Woods, and engaged in the meat business at 1224 Western Avenue.

 


(Click to enlarge)

WOODWARD, Abbie (Palmer) (Obituary) (Died June 30, 1898)
HER LONG SUFFERING ENDS
Mrs. Abbie Woodward called from earth.  
Mrs. Abbie Palmer Woodward, a 35 years' resident of this city, died this morning at 2509 Colfax avenue S, after a long illness.  The funeral will take place from the residence Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock.  The interment will be at Layman's cemetery. The deceased was 64 years old, and was the widow of the late Jasper M. Woodward, who died in 1895.  She leaves 3 sons, Fred W., Harry G., and F.R.E. Woodward.  She came of illustrious ancestors, tracing her descent to Walter Palmer, who came over on the Mayflower.  Her grandfather commanded the defenses in Norwich, Conn., during the American Revolution.  It was at this place where her branch of the Palmer family settled. Mrs. Woodward was a most loveable woman of kindly disposition toward all with whom she came in contact.  She was a thoroughly devoted mother, whose efforts in behalf of her three sons were constant, and the home life animated by her influence was most beautiful.  Her death will be deeply mourned by a host of friends and acquaintenances who came under the influence of her sunny disposition and helpful character.  She was a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  

A second obituary appeared in either the Mpls. Journal or Tribune.  

DEATH'S CALL COMES Mrs. Abbie Ann Palmer Woodward, Mother of Franc R. E. Woodward dies of Heart Failure.   Mrs. Abbie Ann Palmer Woodward, aged 64 years, mother of Franc R. E. Woodward, died this morning at the residence, 2509 Colfax avenue, of heart failure.  Deceased had been ailing for about a year.  The funeral will be held Saturday afternoon from the above address.  Interment will be at Lakewood. (this was an error). Mrs. Woodward had resided in Minneapolis 35 years and was the widow of the late J. M. Woodward.  She was a descendant of Walter Palmer, one of the Mayflower pilgrims, and the granddaughter of the war.  In addition to Franc R. E. Woodward, she leaves two sons, Frederick W. Woodward of Minneapolis, and Harry G. Woodward of Tuscalcose Ala.  

Submitted by Claudia Schuman

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 328

WOODWORTH, E.P. Woodworth born in Ashtabula county, Ohio, July 13th, 1844. Lived there seventeen years, and in Pennsylvania three years. He enlisted in the naval service, August 13th, 1864; served ten months, and was discharged. He was married July 24th, 1866, to Selina C. Clarke, of Pennsylvania, and came to Maple Grove where he has since lived. They have three children living.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 661

WOOLLEY, John G. was born February 15th, 1850, at Collinsville, Butler county, Ohio. He accompanied his parents to Paris, Edgar county, Illinois in 1860. In 1869, removed to California, remaining one year, and in 1872 went to Europe. He studied law with Honorable James A. Eads, of Paris, Illinois, and attended the law college of Michigan University. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1878 and formed a partnership and has practiced law since. He married in 1873 to Mary V. Gerhard, of Delaware, Ohio. Their children are: Paul G., Edwin C. and John Rea.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 277

WOOSTER, Dr. S.J. was born in Lenawee county, Michigan, in, 1850. He came with his, grandparents to Long Lake, Minnesota, and learned thoroughly the prescription part of the drug business, with George Savoy, of Minneapolis, and was associated with C. A. Bundy in the drug trade. He studied medicine with Dr. Karl Bendeke, of Minneapolis; graduated at Keokuk College of Physicians and Surgeons, receiving medical advice from some of the best physicians in America. He then located at Long Lake. In 1876 he married Margaret Jordan. One child has been born to them.

 

History of Hennepin County and The City of Minneapolis, 1881. North Star Publishing

Page 661

WORRALL, James C. was born at Covington, Kentucky, February 11th, 1855. He moved with his parents to Genesoo, Illinois, in 1857, where he attended high school, and graduated from Geneseo Seminary. He entered the Union law school of Chicago in 1875, and graduated after a two year' course, at which time he was admitted to practice. He then returned to Geneseo and formed a partnership with Senator E. C. Moderwell. They practiced as a law firm until 1880, when Mr. Worrall came to Minneapolis and opened an office at 27 Washington Avenue south. His marriage to Miss Emma K. Lawrence occurred at Geneseo, Illinois, October 3d, 1878.

 

WYMOND, Francis Clerihew, Late in the year 2000, while searching Westminister's Archives, senior pastor Timothy Hart-Anderson found a dusty old scrapbook titled "Book of Remembrances, Class No. 1. Compiled by ten boys ages 10-12, and inspired by their teacher Andrew Benton, the book is filled with photos, information about the boys, inspiring quotes from notable regional and national figures, and messages to future students. Click on the link below to explore the Book of Remembrance and read the legacy left by ten boys, including Francis Clerihew Wymond.
http://www.ewestminster.org/classof01/biographies